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SAMBO

of her bed at night. But it was not because she cared for him; I began to think she was actuated by fear.
One afternoon I wanted Janey, and she was not to be found in nursery or garden; I searched the house in vain and was beginning to despair, when I remembered the attics. The attics were out of bounds owing to an unrailed stair that led up to them, but I was none the less successful.
There, in a stockade composed of trunks and portmanteaux, sat Janey surrounded by her dolls.
Her face was wreathed in smiles. On her lap sat Eric, at her feet lay Rose in the well-known state of trance.
`So this is the way you spend your afternoons!' I said. `I wonder what your aunt would say if she knew.' `Oh, please don't tell her, uncle!' Janey replied. `And whatever happens, don't tell Sambo!'
Until she spoke, I had not noticed the absence of that individual. On inquiry it seemed that Sambo had been left fast asleep in the garden. I raised the heavy attic window and looked out. Yes, there he was sitting propped up on the garden seat looking up at us with eyes that seemed to me very wide awake.
`I'm afraid he knows where we are!' said Janey, `he is so very clever.'
Of course I said nothing to Mary of what went on upstairs. There was less need to, as Janey's visits to her banished family very soon ceased. It was my belief that Sambo had put a stop to them. Of what happened behind the raspberry canes I very seldom speak. I never told Mary, who being entirely without imagination would have believed that I was either lying or Janey mad. '
The afternoon had been more than usually close. Mary was cross, Janey was listless, and I sleepy. I had as usual ensconced myself, in the shady corner of the kitchen garden where the maid never thinks of looking when she comes to announce callers, and where I not infrequently surprise school children in search of our blackbirds' nests. I was awakened from my nap by the accustomed sound of someone in the raspberry canes.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of her bed at night. But it was not because she cared for him; I began to think she was actuated by fear. One afternoon I wanted Janey, and she was not to be found in nursery or garden; I searched what is house in vain and was beginning to despair, when I remembered what is attics. what is attics were out of bounds owing to an unrailed stair that led up to them, but I was none what is less successful. There, in a stockade composed of trunks and portmanteaux, sat Janey surrounded by her dolls. Her face was wreathed in smiles. On her lap sat Eric, at her feet lay Rose in what is well-known state of trance. `So this is what is way you spend your afternoons!' I said. `I wonder what your aunt would say if she knew.' `®h, please don't tell her, uncle!' Janey replied. `And whatever happens, don't tell Sambo!' Until she spoke, I had not noticed what is absence of that individual. On inquiry it seemed that Sambo had been left fast asleep in what is garden. I raised what is heavy attic window and looked out. Yes, there he was sitting propped up on what is garden seat looking up at us with eyes that seemed to me very wide awake. `I'm afraid he knows where we are!' said Janey, `he is so very clever.' Of course I said nothing to Mary of what went on upstairs. There was less need to, as Janey's what is s to her banished family very soon ceased. It was my belief that Sambo had put a stop to them. Of what happened behind what is raspberry canes I very seldom speak. I never told Mary, who being entirely without imagination would have believed that I was either lying or Janey mad. ' what is afternoon had been more than usually close. Mary was cross, Janey was listless, and I sleepy. I had as usual ensconced myself, in what is shady corner of what is kitchen garden where what is maid never thinks of looking when she comes to announce callers, and where I not infrequently surprise school children in search of our blackbirds' nests. I was awakened from my nap by what is accustomed sound of someone in what is raspberry canes. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 112 where is p align="center" where is strong SAMBO where is p align="justify" of her bed at night. But it was not because she cared for him; I began to think she was actuated by fear. One afternoon I wanted Janey, and she was not to be found in nursery or garden; I searched what is house in vain and was beginning to despair, when I remembered what is attics. what is attics were out of bounds owing to an unrailed stair that led up to them, but I was none what is less successful. There, in a stockade composed of trunks and portmanteaux, sat Janey surrounded by her dolls. Her face was wreathed in smiles. On her lap sat Eric, at her feet lay Rose in what is well-known state of trance. `So this is what is way you spend your afternoons!' I said. `I wonder what your aunt would say if she knew.' `Oh, please don't tell her, uncle!' Janey replied. `And whatever happens, don't tell Sambo!' Until she spoke, I had not noticed what is absence of that individual. On inquiry it seemed that Sambo had been left fast asleep in the garden. I raised what is heavy attic window and looked out. Yes, there he was sitting propped up on what is garden seat looking up at us with eyes that seemed to me very wide awake. `I'm afraid he knows where we are!' said Janey, `he is so very clever.' Of course I said nothing to Mary of what went on upstairs. There was less need to, as Janey's what is s to her banished family very soon ceased. It was my belief that Sambo had put a stop to them. Of what happened behind what is raspberry canes I very seldom speak. I never told Mary, who being entirely without imagination would have believed that I was either lying or Janey mad. ' what is afternoon had been more than usually close. Mary was cross, Janey was listless, and I sleepy. I had as usual ensconced myself, in what is shady corner of what is kitchen garden where what is maid never thinks of looking when she comes to announce callers, and where I not infrequently surprise school children in search of our blackbirds' nests. I was awakened from my nap by what is accustomed sound of someone in what is raspberry canes. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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