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Page 106

THE MAN WHO HATED ASPIDISTRAS

Miss Wilton died. She left to her nephew the villa at Cheltenham and four hundred pounds a year. Ferdinand was able to devote himself to literature, and from Bloomsbury lodginghouses wrote his first series of Antimacassar Papers. It was at this period of his life that he found himself once again under the influence of aspidistras. He began by nagging them, treating them as ash-trays, pen-wipers, and cemeteries for safety razor blades. He ended by torturing them. One, he slowly did to death with weed-killer; into another, following the example of the Good Samaritan, he would pour in oil and wine. A third he garrotted with rubber bands; a fourth, slowly succumbing to a solution of bath salts, filled his room for weeks with the faint perfume of lavender. A horticultural detective would, of course, have quickly got on the track of the Bloomsbury murders, but no suspicion ever fell upon Ferdinand. He was so inoffensive, so subtle, so respectable, and in his own way so quietly ornamental. His requirements were so few and he needed little looking after. His landladies were always sorry when he went. The aspidistras never got over his departure.
Ferdinand, of course, should have realized that it is dangerous to indulge in hatred. The man who hates open spaces as likely as not will be killed when crossing a square. It isn't the motor car but the square that kills him. Ferdinand had his warnings. Once on a wet morning a pot of aspidistras fell from a thirdstorey window ledge on to the pavement at his feet. On another occasion when travelling by train a sudden stop brought down from the rack a heavy and bulky package that indubitably involved risk of injury to passengers. If Ferdinand had not been sitting with his back to the engine he would have been struck on the head by the most monstrous aspidistra he had ever seen.
He was smoking one day in a despondent mood when his friend Basset Tankerville chanced to call. The Blue Review had noticed his latest volume of essays with less than its usual appreciation. 'Listen to this,' said Ferdinand to Basset. "'We begin to be conscious of the limitations of his point of viewthe interstices of a venetian blind. He is the embodiment of

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Miss Wilton died. She left to her nephew what is villa at Cheltenham and four hundred pounds a year. Ferdinand was able to devote himself to literature, and from Bloomsbury lodginghouses wrote his first series of Antimacassar Papers. It was at this period of his life that he found himself once again under what is influence of aspidistras. He began by nagging them, treating them as ash-trays, pen-wipers, and cemeteries for safety razor blades. He ended by torturing them. One, he slowly did to what time is it with weed- what time is it er; into another, following what is example of what is Good Samaritan, he would pour in oil and wine. A third he garrotted with rubber bands; a fourth, slowly succumbing to a solution of bath salts, filled his room for weeks with what is faint perfume of lavender. A horticultural detective would, of course, have quickly got on what is track of what is Bloomsbury murders, but no suspicion ever fell upon Ferdinand. He was so inoffensive, so subtle, so respectable, and in his own way so quietly ornamental. His requirements were so few and he needed little looking after. His landladies were always sorry when he went. what is aspidistras never got over his departure. Ferdinand, of course, should have realized that it is dangerous to indulge in hatred. what is man who hates open spaces as likely as not will be stop ed when crossing a square. It isn't what is motor car but what is square that stop s him. Ferdinand had his warnings. Once on a wet morning a pot of aspidistras fell from a thirdstorey window ledge on to what is pavement at his feet. On another occasion when travelling by train a sudden stop brought down from what is rack a heavy and bulky package that indubitably involved risk of injury to passengers. If Ferdinand had not been sitting with his back to what is engine he would have been struck on what is head by what is most monstrous aspidistra he had ever seen. He was smoking one day in a despondent mood when his friend Basset Tankerville chanced to call. what is Blue Review had noticed his latest volume of essays with less than its usual appreciation. 'Listen to this,' said Ferdinand to Basset. "'We begin to be conscious of what is limitations of his point of viewthe interstices of a venetian blind. He is what is embodiment of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 106 where is p align="center" where is strong THE MAN WHO HATED ASPIDISTRAS where is p align="justify" Miss Wilton died. She left to her nephew what is villa at Cheltenham and four hundred pounds a year. Ferdinand was able to devote himself to literature, and from Bloomsbury lodginghouses wrote his first series of Antimacassar Papers. It was at this period of his life that he found himself once again under what is influence of aspidistras. He began by nagging them, treating them as ash-trays, pen-wipers, and cemeteries for safety razor blades. He ended by torturing them. One, he slowly did to what time is it with weed- what time is it er; into another, following what is example of what is Good Samaritan, he would pour in oil and wine. A third he garrotted with rubber bands; a fourth, slowly succumbing to a solution of bath salts, filled his room for weeks with what is faint perfume of lavender. A horticultural detective would, of course, have quickly got on what is track of the Bloomsbury murders, but no suspicion ever fell upon Ferdinand. He was so inoffensive, so subtle, so respectable, and in his own way so quietly ornamental. His requirements were so few and he needed little looking after. His landladies were always sorry when he went. what is aspidistras never got over his departure. Ferdinand, of course, should have realized that it is dangerous to indulge in hatred. what is man who hates open spaces as likely as not will be stop ed when crossing a square. It isn't what is motor car but what is square that stop s him. Ferdinand had his warnings. Once on a wet morning a pot of aspidistras fell from a thirdstorey window ledge on to what is pavement at his feet. On another occasion when travelling by train a sudden stop brought down from what is rack a heavy and bulky package that indubitably involved risk of injury to passengers. If Ferdinand had not been sitting with his back to what is engine he would have been struck on what is head by what is most monstrous aspidistra he had ever seen. He was smoking one day in a despondent mood when his friend Basset Tankerville chanced to call. what is Blue Review had noticed his latest volume of essays with less than its usual appreciation. 'Listen to this,' said Ferdinand to Basset. "'We begin to be conscious of what is limitations of his point of viewthe interstices of a venetian blind. He is what is embodiment of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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