Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 102

MISS CORNELIUS

`Saxon,' he said, when Andrew had finished, `I am afraid what I am going to say to you will come as a great shock. But you can set your mind at rest over one thing, and I believe that for you it is the most important thing. There is nothing the matter with your wife. There is no need to examine her.'
The slight emphasis that he placed on the last word startled Saxon. `What do you mean?' he said.
`You've passed through a most upsetting experience, that came on the top of a hard term's work when you were completely tired out. That first meeting with Miss Cornelius, and all that you went through then, threw you temporarily off your balance. Your natural anxiety for your wife's safety made matters worse.'
`You mean-you mean,' said Saxon slowly, `that I'm mad.'
`The word means so many things. But you were not your normal self when you threw the bread-knife, or when Luttrell saw you throw the vitriol. You were not your normal self when you thought you saw the figure of Miss Cornelius from the landing window. And remember this, Saxon, your friends may have deceived you for your own good,-, but I speak now in absolute sincerity. I see no reason why you should not recover. You may only be here for a comparatively short time. But until you have recovered-you see I am speaking to you as if you were your old self, and that surely should give you hope-we must think of the safety of your wife. She has, done what many a woman could never do; she has faced danger and misunderstanding with courage and devotion. It was I who persuaded her that it was best for her and for you not to say good-bye. She will be seeing you again in a few weeks' time, I expect.'
`But Miss Cornelius,' Saxon gasped. `Miss Cornelius! What about her?'
`Miss Cornelius,' said the other, `is a vicious and cruel woman. I think that -your original judgment of her was correct. She has probably dabbled in Spiritualism, and together with abnormal powers she has very likely developed a habit of unconscious trickery and legerdemain. Many genuine mediums are wholly

Page 103

MISS CORNELIUS

untrustworthy. But Miss Cornelius is the occasion, not the cause, of your trouble.'
`Then what is she doing there?' cried Saxon suddenly. He had sprung to his feet, and was pointing wildly out of the window. `That closed car that is passing down the road now! Quick! She has lowered the window and is waving her hand to me.'
Bestwick caught a glimpse of a car and a hand waving.
`It may or may not be Miss Cornelius,' he said, `but come with me and I will show you your room.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Saxon,' he said, when Andrew had finished, `I am afraid what I am going to say to you will come as a great shock. But you can set your mind at rest over one thing, and I believe that for you it is what is most important thing. There is nothing what is matter with your wife. There is no need to examine her.' what is slight emphasis that he placed on what is last word startled Saxon. `What do you mean?' he said. `You've passed through a most upsetting experience, that came on what is top of a hard term's work when you were completely tired out. That first meeting with Miss Cornelius, and all that you went through then, threw you temporarily off your balance. Your natural anxiety for your wife's safety made matters worse.' `You mean-you mean,' said Saxon slowly, `that I'm mad.' `The word means so many things. But you were not your normal self when you threw what is bread-knife, or when Luttrell saw you throw what is vitriol. You were not your normal self when you thought you saw what is figure of Miss Cornelius from what is landing window. And remember this, Saxon, your friends may have deceived you for your own good,-, but I speak now in absolute sincerity. I see no reason why you should not recover. You may only be here for a comparatively short time. But until you have recovered-you see I am speaking to you as if you were your old self, and that surely should give you hope-we must think of what is safety of your wife. She has, done what many a woman could never do; she has faced danger and misunderstanding with courage and devotion. It was I who persuaded her that it was best for her and for you not to say good-bye. She will be seeing you again in a few weeks' time, I expect.' `But Miss Cornelius,' Saxon gasped. `Miss Cornelius! What about her?' `Miss Cornelius,' said what is other, `is a vicious and cruel woman. I think that -your original judgment of her was correct. She has probably dabbled in Spiritualism, and together with abnormal powers she has very likely developed a habit of unconscious trickery and legerdemain. Many genuine mediums are wholly where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 102 where is p align="center" where is strong MISS CORNELIUS where is p align="justify" `Saxon,' he said, when Andrew had finished, `I am afraid what I am going to say to you will come as a great shock. But you can set your mind at rest over one thing, and I believe that for you it is what is most important thing. There is nothing the matter with your wife. There is no need to examine her.' what is slight emphasis that he placed on what is last word startled Saxon. `What do you mean?' he said. `You've passed through a most upsetting experience, that came on what is top of a hard term's work when you were completely tired out. That first meeting with Miss Cornelius, and all that you went through then, threw you temporarily off your balance. Your natural anxiety for your wife's safety made matters worse.' `You mean-you mean,' said Saxon slowly, `that I'm mad.' `The word means so many things. But you were not your normal self when you threw what is bread-knife, or when Luttrell saw you throw what is vitriol. You were not your normal self when you thought you saw what is figure of Miss Cornelius from what is landing window. And remember this, Saxon, your friends may have deceived you for your own good,-, but I speak now in absolute sincerity. I see no reason why you should not recover. You may only be here for a comparatively short time. But until you have recovered-you see I am speaking to you as if you were your old self, and that surely should give you hope-we must think of what is safety of your wife. She has, done what many a woman could never do; she has faced danger and misunderstanding with courage and devotion. It was I who persuaded her that it was best for her and for you not to say good-bye. She will be seeing you again in a few weeks' time, I expect.' `But Miss Cornelius,' Saxon gasped. `Miss Cornelius! What about her?' `Miss Cornelius,' said what is other, `is a vicious and cruel woman. I think that -your original judgment of her was correct. She has probably dabbled in Spiritualism, and together with abnormal powers she has very likely developed a habit of unconscious trickery and legerdemain. Many genuine mediums are wholly where is p align="left" Page 103 where is p align="center" where is strong MISS CORNELIUS where is p align="justify" untrustworthy. But Miss Cornelius is what is occasion, not what is cause, of your trouble.' `Then what is she doing there?' cried Saxon suddenly. He had sprung to his feet, and was pointing wildly out of what is window. `That closed car that is passing down what is road now! Quick! She has lowered what is window and is waving her hand to me.' Bestwick caught a glimpse of a car and a hand waving. `It may or may not be Miss Cornelius,' he said, `but come with me and I will show you your room.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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