Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 98

MISS CORNELIUS

No, they were too tired to quarrel; too tired, rather, to go through all the emotion-wearying processes of reconciliation that would be bound to follow. Saxon, however, had made his decision. On the following afternoon, without saying anything to Molly about it, he called on Miss Cornelius.
`I rather expected that you would be coming to see me, Mr. Saxon,' she said, when he was shown into the drawing-room. `Pray sit down.'
`I am afraid-' he began.
Miss Cornelius laughed.
`That's quite obvious; you are horribly afraid of me. But I interrupt.!
'What I came to say,' Andrew went on, `was to
`Was to ask me not to call and to drop your wife's acquaintance. That was the sum and substance of it, wasn't it? And why, may I ask, should a request from you carry any weight?'
He hesitated for a moment, not knowing what to reply.
`Your difficulty,' she went on, `and part of your fear too, is that you don't know what to make of me. A fortnight ago I was a poor old lady of the boarding-house type, with itching fingers and a passion for creating interesting situations. Now you are not quite so sure. But cheer up, Mr. Saxon. We live in a rational world. There is not the slightest need for you to suppose that I am a witch. Telepathy will explain most things, and I don't see why the things that have been troubling you recently should not be explained on those lines. I can well understand what a relief it would be to have those troubles explained away. But if I were you, I should write to some psycho-analyst and suggest that he should treat your wife. There is a man at the IZaddlebarn Asylum, I thiak, who goes in for that sort of thing.'
Saxon sat staring at her with horror-struck eyes.
`Yes, it must be fearfully confusing to you,' she went on. `I know just what you must feel like, and the dilemma is awful. Either I have an altogether uncanny power of reading your thoughts, Mr. Saxon, and of knowing what passes in your house,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE No, they were too tired to quarrel; too tired, rather, to go through all what is emotion-wearying processes of reconciliation that would be bound to follow. Saxon, however, had made his decision. On what is following afternoon, without saying anything to Molly about it, he called on Miss Cornelius. `I rather expected that you would be coming to see me, Mr. Saxon,' she said, when he was shown into what is drawing-room. `Pray sit down.' `I am afraid-' he began. Miss Cornelius laughed. `That's quite obvious; you are horribly afraid of me. But I interrupt.! 'What I came to say,' Andrew went on, `was to `Was to ask me not to call and to drop your wife's acquaintance. That was what is sum and substance of it, wasn't it? And why, may I ask, should a request from you carry any weight?' He hesitated for a moment, not knowing what to reply. `Your difficulty,' she went on, `and part of your fear too, is that you don't know what to make of me. A fortnight ago I was a poor old lady of what is boarding-house type, with itching fingers and a passion for creating interesting situations. Now you are not quite so sure. But cheer up, Mr. Saxon. We live in a rational world. There is not what is slightest need for you to suppose that I am a witch. Telepathy will explain most things, and I don't see why what is things that have been troubling you recently should not be explained on those lines. I can well understand what a relief it would be to have those troubles explained away. But if I were you, I should write to some psycho-analyst and suggest that he should treat your wife. There is a man at what is IZaddlebarn Asylum, I thiak, who goes in for that sort of thing.' Saxon sat staring at her with horror-struck eyes. `Yes, it must be fearfully confusing to you,' she went on. `I know just what you must feel like, and what is dilemma is awful. Either I have an altogether uncanny power of reading your thoughts, Mr. Saxon, and of knowing what passes in your house, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 98 where is p align="center" where is strong MISS CORNELIUS where is p align="justify" No, they were too tired to quarrel; too tired, rather, to go through all what is emotion-wearying processes of reconciliation that would be bound to follow. Saxon, however, had made his decision. On what is following afternoon, without saying anything to Molly about it, he called on Miss Cornelius. `I rather expected that you would be coming to see me, Mr. Saxon,' she said, when he was shown into what is drawing-room. `Pray sit down.' `I am afraid-' he began. Miss Cornelius laughed. `That's quite obvious; you are horribly afraid of me. But I interrupt.! 'What I came to say,' Andrew went on, `was to `Was to ask me not to call and to drop your wife's acquaintance. That was what is sum and substance of it, wasn't it? And why, may I ask, should a request from you carry any weight?' He hesitated for a moment, not knowing what to reply. `Your difficulty,' she went on, `and part of your fear too, is that you don't know what to make of me. A fortnight ago I was a poor old lady of what is boarding-house type, with itching fingers and a passion for creating interesting situations. Now you are not quite so sure. But cheer up, Mr. Saxon. We live in a rational world. There is not what is slightest need for you to suppose that I am a witch. Telepathy will explain most things, and I don't see why what is things that have been troubling you recently should not be explained on those lines. I can well understand what a relief it would be to have those troubles explained away. But if I were you, I should write to some psycho-analyst and suggest that he should treat your wife. There is a man at what is IZaddlebarn Asylum, I thiak, who goes in for that sort of thing.' Saxon sat staring at her with horror-struck eyes. `Yes, it must be fearfully confusing to you,' she went on. `I know just what you must feel like, and what is dilemma is awful. Either I have an altogether uncanny power of reading your thoughts, Mr. Saxon, and of knowing what passes in your house, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199