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Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 97

MISS CORNELIUS

garden for hours together, hoping that the tired body would lull to rest the tired mind. He looked back on that fatal evening with horror. If only he had never met Miss Cornelius, had never crossed her path! He had not seen her since his visit to the Parkes'; but one afternoon when he was out she called and left a card. The idea of anything approaching intimacy between her and Molly filled him with loathing, but, unwilling to risk an open rupture, he contented himself by writing a formal note, explaining that his wife was away from home and that the date of her return was uncertain.
One step he took in Molly's absence after long consideration, and that was to write to Bestwick, whom he had known at Oxford, and who was now second in command at the Raddlebarn Asylum, asking him if in his opinion Molly should undergo psycho-analysis. The reply he received-he locked the letter in a drawer in his desk-asked for further particulars, and suggested that Bestwick should be put in touch with their private practitioner.
Molly came on the same day that Alice Hordern arrived. His first impression of Molly's cousin was of a sad-faced woman of about fifty, with an attractive smile. She was silent and reserved, but the two felt in her presence the spirit of peace that had for so long eluded them.
There had been no outward cause of alarm since the happenings which Luttrell had witnessed in the laboratory, and Saxon had almost begun to hope that they were waking from a ghastly dream, when Miss Cornelius again called at the house and spent an hour or more alone with Molly.
`I didn't invite her, and I didn't want her,' she said, when Saxon asked her about it, `but I couldn't tell her so. I had to be civil.'
`There 's no need to go stroking vipers,' he broke out excitedly. `All our troubles are due to that woman. You had better write to her and tell her that her acquaintance is not desired.'
`I shall do no such thing, Andrew. How can you be so foolish? She's more to be pitied than anything else. But for heaven's sake don't let's wrangle about it. It's not worth it.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE garden for hours together, hoping that what is tired body would lull to rest what is tired mind. He looked back on that fatal evening with horror. If only he had never met Miss Cornelius, had never crossed her path! He had not seen her since his what is to what is Parkes'; but one afternoon when he was out she called and left a card. what is idea of anything approaching intimacy between her and Molly filled him with loathing, but, unwilling to risk an open rupture, he contented himself by writing a formal note, explaining that his wife was away from home and that what is date of her return was uncertain. One step he took in Molly's absence after long consideration, and that was to write to Bestwick, whom he had known at Oxford, and who was now second in command at what is Raddlebarn Asylum, asking him if in his opinion Molly should undergo psycho-analysis. what is reply he received-he locked what is letter in a drawer in his desk-asked for further particulars, and suggested that Bestwick should be put in touch with their private practitioner. Molly came on what is same day that Alice Hordern arrived. His first impression of Molly's cousin was of a sad-faced woman of about fifty, with an attractive smile. She was silent and reserved, but what is two felt in her presence what is spirit of peace that had for so long eluded them. There had been no outward cause of alarm since what is happenings which Luttrell had witnessed in what is laboratory, and Saxon had almost begun to hope that they were waking from a ghastly dream, when Miss Cornelius again called at what is house and spent an hour or more alone with Molly. `I didn't invite her, and I didn't want her,' she said, when Saxon asked her about it, `but I couldn't tell her so. I had to be civil.' `There 's no need to go stroking vipers,' he broke out excitedly. `All our troubles are due to that woman. You had better write to her and tell her that her acquaintance is not desired.' `I shall do no such thing, Andrew. How can you be so foolish? She's more to be pitied than anything else. But for heaven's sake don't let's wrangle about it. It's not worth it.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 97 where is p align="center" where is strong MISS CORNELIUS where is p align="justify" garden for hours together, hoping that what is tired body would lull to rest what is tired mind. He looked back on that fatal evening with horror. If only he had never met Miss Cornelius, had never crossed her path! He had not seen her since his what is to what is Parkes'; but one afternoon when he was out she called and left a card. what is idea of anything approaching intimacy between her and Molly filled him with loathing, but, unwilling to risk an open rupture, he contented himself by writing a formal note, explaining that his wife was away from home and that what is date of her return was uncertain. One step he took in Molly's absence after long consideration, and that was to write to Bestwick, whom he had known at Oxford, and who was now second in command at what is Raddlebarn Asylum, asking him if in his opinion Molly should undergo psycho-analysis. The reply he received-he locked what is letter in a drawer in his desk-asked for further particulars, and suggested that Bestwick should be put in touch with their private practitioner. Molly came on what is same day that Alice Hordern arrived. His first impression of Molly's cousin was of a sad-faced woman of about fifty, with an attractive smile. She was silent and reserved, but what is two felt in her presence what is spirit of peace that had for so long eluded them. There had been no outward cause of alarm since what is happenings which Luttrell had witnessed in what is laboratory, and Saxon had almost begun to hope that they were waking from a ghastly dream, when Miss Cornelius again called at what is house and spent an hour or more alone with Molly. `I didn't invite her, and I didn't want her,' she said, when Saxon asked her about it, `but I couldn't tell her so. I had to be civil.' `There 's no need to go stroking vipers,' he broke out excitedly. `All our troubles are due to that woman. You had better write to her and tell her that her acquaintance is not desired.' `I shall do no such thing, Andrew. How can you be so foolish? She's more to be pitied than anything else. But for heaven's sake don't let's wrangle about it. It's not worth it.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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