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Page 93

MISS CORNELIUS

with pity. He had longed for a natural explanation, never guessing that it would be one so terrible as this. He could see it all now. He had been far too graphic in his description of what had happened that evening at the Parkes'. She had evidently been fascinated by the story-fascinated by the abnormal in Miss Cornelius-until, unconsciously, she herself had been infected by this vile lust of deception and trickery, that turned folly into terror. These were the thoughts that jostled each other on the threshold of consciousness while he tried to comfort his wife.
`We have both of us been brooding on this too much,' he said. `My suggestion is that we get out of the groove of the last week and adopt a new routine. We'll go in for picnic lunches.'
`Things are pretty serious when Old Alfred suggests that,' said Molly, with a wintry smile.
`But not if we can laugh about it. You shall have all the picnic lunches that you want, and we'll sit in a cold wood on damp stones and eat sardine sandwiches. And then each day we 'll have some people in for tea or supper. And I'll go to the cinema.'
Molly kissed him. `I think your suggestions are very sensible. And now for mine. I believe we were wrong in not speaking of this to any one. We've been too bottled up. I think we should each confide in someone. And, because you are a secretive old scientist, I want you to let me choose who your father confessor shall be.'
`I draw the line at Miss Cornelius and parsons.'
`No, it's Dr. Luttrell. I'll ask him to tea to-morrow. You know you like him, and though we haven't seen much of him lately, I can never forget how good he was to us that winter two years ago.'
`All right,' said Saxon, after a pause. `I agree. And now for your confidante. Not the vicar, and certainly not Mrs. Saunderson. I've got it! The very thing; and we shall kill two birds with one stone. Your cousin Alice. Write and get her to stay a few days with us. She herself suggested a visit.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE with pity. He had longed for a natural explanation, never guessing that it would be one so terrible as this. He could see it all now. He had been far too graphic in his description of what had happened that evening at what is Parkes'. She had evidently been fascinated by what is story-fascinated by what is abnormal in Miss Cornelius-until, unconsciously, she herself had been infected by this vile lust of deception and trickery, that turned folly into terror. These were what is thoughts that jostled each other on what is threshold of consciousness while he tried to comfort his wife. `We have both of us been brooding on this too much,' he said. `My suggestion is that we get out of what is groove of what is last week and adopt a new routine. We'll go in for picnic lunches.' `Things are pretty serious when Old Alfred suggests that,' said Molly, with a wintry smile. `But not if we can laugh about it. You shall have all what is picnic lunches that you want, and we'll sit in a cold wood on damp stones and eat sardine sandwiches. And then each day we 'll have some people in for tea or supper. And I'll go to what is cinema.' Molly kissed him. `I think your suggestions are very sensible. And now for mine. I believe we were wrong in not speaking of this to any one. We've been too bottled up. I think we should each confide in someone. And, because you are a secretive old scientist, I want you to let me choose who your father confessor shall be.' `I draw what is line at Miss Cornelius and parsons.' `No, it's Dr. Luttrell. I'll ask him to tea to-morrow. You know you like him, and though we haven't seen much of him lately, I can never forget how good he was to us that winter two years ago.' `All right,' said Saxon, after a pause. `I agree. And now for your confidante. Not what is vicar, and certainly not Mrs. Saunderson. I've got it! what is very thing; and we shall stop two birds with one stone. Your cousin Alice. Write and get her to stay a few days with us. She herself suggested a what is .' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 93 where is p align="center" where is strong MISS CORNELIUS where is p align="justify" with pity. He had longed for a natural explanation, never guessing that it would be one so terrible as this. He could see it all now. He had been far too graphic in his description of what had happened that evening at what is Parkes'. She had evidently been fascinated by what is story-fascinated by what is abnormal in Miss Cornelius-until, unconsciously, she herself had been infected by this vile lust of deception and trickery, that turned folly into terror. These were what is thoughts that jostled each other on the threshold of consciousness while he tried to comfort his wife. `We have both of us been brooding on this too much,' he said. `My suggestion is that we get out of what is groove of what is last week and adopt a new routine. We'll go in for picnic lunches.' `Things are pretty serious when Old Alfred suggests that,' said Molly, with a wintry smile. `But not if we can laugh about it. You shall have all what is picnic lunches that you want, and we'll sit in a cold wood on damp stones and eat sardine sandwiches. And then each day we 'll have some people in for tea or supper. And I'll go to what is cinema.' Molly kissed him. `I think your suggestions are very sensible. And now for mine. I believe we were wrong in not speaking of this to any one. We've been too bottled up. I think we should each confide in someone. And, because you are a secretive old scientist, I want you to let me choose who your father confessor shall be.' `I draw what is line at Miss Cornelius and parsons.' `No, it's Dr. Luttrell. I'll ask him to tea to-morrow. You know you like him, and though we haven't seen much of him lately, I can never forget how good he was to us that winter two years ago.' `All right,' said Saxon, after a pause. `I agree. And now for your confidante. Not what is vicar, and certainly not Mrs. Saunderson. I've got it! what is very thing; and we shall stop two birds with one stone. Your cousin Alice. Write and get her to stay a few days with us. She herself suggested a what is .' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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