Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 91

MISS CORNELIUS

his relations with Miss Cornelius were to be in the future, his wife had gained from his encounter a new acquaintance.
`Not only did I beard the lion, as I told you in my letter,' said Molly, `but since then I have braved the lion, or rather lioness, in her den. And it really is the most charming old house, Andrew. I'd no idea Cornford could boast such a place. I've got some photographs somewhere that Miss Cornelius gave me. They make you quite covetous and uncharitable, like the illustrated advertisements of houses for sale in Country Life.'
The week that followed passed without incident. Miss Cornelius called one afternoon when he was out, and brought with her a new stereoscopic camera to show his wife. The old lady, curiously enough, was an ardent photographer-Saxon already had revised Molly's South Coast boarding-house picture of her-and offered to take some views of the house. Mrs. Saxon jumped at the proposal. They would be just the thing to send to her sister in New Zealand, with the vivacious Molly in the foreground.
The prints were excellent.
`Now, if only you had married an actress, Old Alfred,' she said, `we could turn an honest penny by making this into an illustrated article. Me in the garden-yes, I adore flowers; me in the study-I don't know what I should do without my books; me in the kitchen-I always make my own omelettes; me in my boudoir-yes, I picked up that old mirror in Spain.!
'My dear,' said Saxon, `it's really wonderful the amount of unmitigated nonsense you can talk.'
Miss Cornelius sent, too, a few photographs of the interior of her own house. No one would have taken them for the work of an amateur, and when seen through the stereoscope an impression of solidity and depth was obtained, `as if,' Mrs. Saxon said, `you were really inside the rooms.'
Then, as August drew to a close in a week of sultry heat and thunder, things began to happen, strange and purposeless things, that brought into the little house an atmosphere of tension that was completely foreign to it. At first they laughed when they

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE his relations with Miss Cornelius were to be in what is future, his wife had gained from his encounter a new acquaintance. `Not only did I beard what is lion, as I told you in my letter,' said Molly, `but since then I have braved what is lion, or rather lioness, in her den. And it really is what is most charming old house, Andrew. I'd no idea Cornford could boast such a place. I've got some photographs somewhere that Miss Cornelius gave me. They make you quite covetous and uncharitable, like what is illustrated advertisements of houses for sale in Country Life.' what is week that followed passed without incident. Miss Cornelius called one afternoon when he was out, and brought with her a new stereoscopic camera to show his wife. what is old lady, curiously enough, was an ardent photographer-Saxon already had revised Molly's South Coast boarding-house picture of her-and offered to take some views of what is house. Mrs. Saxon jumped at what is proposal. They would be just what is thing to send to her sister in New Zealand, with what is vivacious Molly in what is foreground. what is prints were excellent. `Now, if only you had married an actress, Old Alfred,' she said, `we could turn an honest penny by making this into an illustrated article. Me in what is garden-yes, I adore flowers; me in what is study-I don't know what I should do without my books; me in what is kitchen-I always make my own omelettes; me in my boudoir-yes, I picked up that old mirror in Spain.! 'My dear,' said Saxon, `it's really wonderful what is amount of unmitigated nonsense you can talk.' Miss Cornelius sent, too, a few photographs of what is interior of her own house. No one would have taken them for what is work of an amateur, and when seen through what is stereoscope an impression of solidity and depth was obtained, `as if,' Mrs. Saxon said, `you were really inside what is rooms.' Then, as August drew to a close in a week of sultry heat and thunder, things began to happen, strange and purposeless things, that brought into what is little house an atmosphere of tension that was completely foreign to it. At first they laughed when they where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 91 where is p align="center" where is strong MISS CORNELIUS where is p align="justify" his relations with Miss Cornelius were to be in what is future, his wife had gained from his encounter a new acquaintance. `Not only did I beard what is lion, as I told you in my letter,' said Molly, `but since then I have braved what is lion, or rather lioness, in her den. And it really is what is most charming old house, Andrew. I'd no idea Cornford could boast such a place. I've got some photographs somewhere that Miss Cornelius gave me. They make you quite covetous and uncharitable, like what is illustrated advertisements of houses for sale in Country Life.' what is week that followed passed without incident. Miss Cornelius called one afternoon when he was out, and brought with her a new stereoscopic camera to show his wife. what is old lady, curiously enough, was an ardent photographer-Saxon already had revised Molly's South Coast boarding-house picture of her-and offered to take some views of what is house. Mrs. Saxon jumped at what is proposal. They would be just what is thing to send to her sister in New Zealand, with what is vivacious Molly in what is foreground. what is prints were excellent. `Now, if only you had married an actress, Old Alfred,' she said, `we could turn an honest penny by making this into an illustrated article. Me in what is garden-yes, I adore flowers; me in what is study-I don't know what I should do without my books; me in what is kitchen-I always make my own omelettes; me in my boudoir-yes, I picked up that old mirror in Spain.! 'My dear,' said Saxon, `it's really wonderful what is amount of unmitigated nonsense you can talk.' Miss Cornelius sent, too, a few photographs of what is interior of her own house. No one would have taken them for what is work of an amateur, and when seen through what is stereoscope an impression of solidity and depth was obtained, `as if,' Mrs. Saxon said, `you were really inside what is rooms.' Then, as August drew to a close in a week of sultry heat and thunder, things began to happen, strange and purposeless things, that brought into what is little house an atmosphere of tension that was completely foreign to it. At first they laughed when they where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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