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Page 88

MISS CORNELIUS

fringe, the wrinkles, and the eyes, dark and challenging, in which cruelty lurked.
`Mrs. Parke,' he began, `I am more sorry than I can say, and I hate what I am going to say, but I believe that Miss Cornelius is closely concerned with what we have witnessed to-night. Miss Cornelius, won't you be frank with us? What is said now need go no farther than this room.'
They were all looking at her. Her face was the colour of old ivory.
`Maisie,' she said, `this is an outrage! What right has this man, who has been talking to me this evening as if he were my friend, to turn suddenly round and try to blacken my character in the presence of people whom I have known intimately for years? I know nothing of what he has been saying. I am as guiltless of fraud or trickery as those two little children asleep upstairs.'
`Excuse me,' Saxon interrupted, `it is only fair to remind you all that we did agree to see this matter through and to disregard the personal factor. I said I was going to be suspicious of every one, and I have been.'
`That's right,' said Parke reluctantly. `But what is it you accuse Miss Cornelius of?'
`I don't accuse her of anything. But I do say that I saw her throw a pen; on several occasions I almost saw objects leaving her hand; and that the phenomena we have witnessed this evening-I should be the first to admit that I cannot at present explain them all-have always occurred in her presence. One word more and I have done. I want to be charitable in what I say and think. I do not say that Miss Cornelius has consciously deceived us. I think that probably unknown to herself she has developed unusual powers of legerdemain, and that she has used it to foster that extraordinary, exhilarating feeling of excitement and suspense which we have been conscious of this evening. And now I think I will go.'
`He thinks he will go!' said Miss Cornelius, speaking with pent-up fury. `He sprinkles me with pitch and then he thinks he can clear off. But let me tell you, Mr. Saxon, an old woman

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE fringe, what is wrinkles, and what is eyes, dark and challenging, in which cruelty lurked. `Mrs. Parke,' he began, `I am more sorry than I can say, and I hate what I am going to say, but I believe that Miss Cornelius is closely concerned with what we have witnessed to-night. Miss Cornelius, won't you be frank with us? What is said now need go no farther than this room.' They were all looking at her. Her face was what is colour of old ivory. `Maisie,' she said, `this is an outrage! What right has this man, who has been talking to me this evening as if he were my friend, to turn suddenly round and try to blacken my character in what is presence of people whom I have known intimately for years? I know nothing of what he has been saying. I am as guiltless of fraud or trickery as those two little children asleep upstairs.' `Excuse me,' Saxon interrupted, `it is only fair to remind you all that we did agree to see this matter through and to disregard what is personal factor. I said I was going to be suspicious of every one, and I have been.' `That's right,' said Parke reluctantly. `But what is it you accuse Miss Cornelius of?' `I don't accuse her of anything. But I do say that I saw her throw a pen; on several occasions I almost saw objects leaving her hand; and that what is phenomena we have witnessed this evening-I should be what is first to admit that I cannot at present explain them all-have always occurred in her presence. One word more and I have done. I want to be charitable in what I say and think. I do not say that Miss Cornelius has consciously deceived us. I think that probably unknown to herself she has developed unusual powers of legerdemain, and that she has used it to foster that extraordinary, exhilarating feeling of excitement and suspense which we have been conscious of this evening. And now I think I will go.' `He thinks he will go!' said Miss Cornelius, speaking with pent-up fury. `He sprinkles me with pitch and then he thinks he can clear off. But let me tell you, Mr. Saxon, an old woman where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 88 where is p align="center" where is strong MISS CORNELIUS where is p align="justify" fringe, what is wrinkles, and what is eyes, dark and challenging, in which cruelty lurked. `Mrs. Parke,' he began, `I am more sorry than I can say, and I hate what I am going to say, but I believe that Miss Cornelius is closely concerned with what we have witnessed to-night. Miss Cornelius, won't you be frank with us? What is said now need go no farther than this room.' They were all looking at her. Her face was what is colour of old ivory. `Maisie,' she said, `this is an outrage! What right has this man, who has been talking to me this evening as if he were my friend, to turn suddenly round and try to blacken my character in what is presence of people whom I have known intimately for years? I know nothing of what he has been saying. I am as guiltless of fraud or trickery as those two little children asleep upstairs.' `Excuse me,' Saxon interrupted, `it is only fair to remind you all that we did agree to see this matter through and to disregard what is personal factor. I said I was going to be suspicious of every one, and I have been.' `That's right,' said Parke reluctantly. `But what is it you accuse Miss Cornelius of?' `I don't accuse her of anything. But I do say that I saw her throw a pen; on several occasions I almost saw objects leaving her hand; and that what is phenomena we have witnessed this evening-I should be what is first to admit that I cannot at present explain them all-have always occurred in her presence. One word more and I have done. I want to be charitable in what I say and think. I do not say that Miss Cornelius has consciously deceived us. I think that probably unknown to herself she has developed unusual powers of legerdemain, and that she has used it to foster that extraordinary, exhilarating feeling of excitement and suspense which we have been conscious of this evening. And now I think I will go.' `He thinks he will go!' said Miss Cornelius, speaking with pent-up fury. `He sprinkles me with pitch and then he thinks he can clear off. But let me tell you, Mr. Saxon, an old woman where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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