Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 84

MISS CORNELIUS

movements of tables and articles of furniture, the mysterious locking and unlocking of doors, and, perhaps strangest of all, the throwing about, apart from any observed human agency, of all sorts of miscellaneous objects, ranging from chessmen and gramophone needles to lumps of coal and metal candlesticks.
`With a little luck it looks as if I should be in for an interesting evening,' said Saxon to his wife. `If I were to hazard a guess, I should say that the servant-girl is somehow connected with it.'
Certainly the evening was interesting. In the drawing-room at Meadowfield Terrace Saxon was introduced by Clinton to Parke and Mrs. Parke and Miss Cornelius. At his suggestion Parke recapitulated the happenings of the last three weeks, his wife and Miss Cornelius from time to time adding or correcting details. The account was given in a straightforward manner that impressed Saxon, nor could he see in any of the three traces of hysteria. All were obviously disturbed at what they had witnessed; Mrs. Parke indeed looked worn and harassed; but neither she nor Miss Cornelius had lost their sense of humour.
`Let us agree on one thing,' he said, `before we go any further. I know very little about poltergeist manifestationsI have an open mind on the subject-but we must not presume an abnormal (I use the word in preference to supernatural) explanation, until we have excluded conscious or unconscious fraud. Apart, too, from the question of fraud, what has been seen may be connected in some way with human agency. We must all watch each other; we must even be suspicious of each other. Anything for a peaceful life. That 's right, isn't it, Mrs. Parke?'
They all agreed.
`What about the maids?' said Clinton.
There was no difficulty there. It was the girl's night out, and the cook had been given leave to spend the evening with a friend.
Miss Cornelius suggested that they should lock both doors,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE movements of tables and articles of furniture, what is mysterious locking and unlocking of doors, and, perhaps strangest of all, what is throwing about, apart from any observed human agency, of all sorts of miscellaneous objects, ranging from chessmen and gramophone needles to lumps of coal and metal candlesticks. `With a little luck it looks as if I should be in for an interesting evening,' said Saxon to his wife. `If I were to hazard a guess, I should say that what is servant-girl is somehow connected with it.' Certainly what is evening was interesting. In what is drawing-room at Meadowfield Terrace Saxon was introduced by Clinton to Parke and Mrs. Parke and Miss Cornelius. At his suggestion Parke recapitulated what is happenings of what is last three weeks, his wife and Miss Cornelius from time to time adding or correcting details. what is account was given in a straightforward manner that impressed Saxon, nor could he see in any of what is three traces of hysteria. All were obviously disturbed at what they had witnessed; Mrs. Parke indeed looked worn and harassed; but neither she nor Miss Cornelius had lost their sense of humour. `Let us agree on one thing,' he said, `before we go any further. I know very little about poltergeist manifestationsI have an open mind on what is subject-but we must not presume an abnormal (I use what is word in preference to supernatural) explanation, until we have excluded conscious or unconscious fraud. Apart, too, from what is question of fraud, what has been seen may be connected in some way with human agency. We must all watch each other; we must even be suspicious of each other. Anything for a peaceful life. That 's right, isn't it, Mrs. Parke?' They all agreed. `What about what is maids?' said Clinton. There was no difficulty there. It was what is girl's night out, and what is cook had been given leave to spend what is evening with a friend. Miss Cornelius suggested that they should lock both doors, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 84 where is p align="center" where is strong MISS CORNELIUS where is p align="justify" movements of tables and articles of furniture, what is mysterious locking and unlocking of doors, and, perhaps strangest of all, what is throwing about, apart from any observed human agency, of all sorts of miscellaneous objects, ranging from chessmen and gramophone needles to lumps of coal and metal candlesticks. `With a little luck it looks as if I should be in for an interesting evening,' said Saxon to his wife. `If I were to hazard a guess, I should say that what is servant-girl is somehow connected with it.' Certainly what is evening was interesting. In what is drawing-room at Meadowfield Terrace Saxon was introduced by Clinton to Parke and Mrs. Parke and Miss Cornelius. At his suggestion Parke recapitulated what is happenings of what is last three weeks, his wife and Miss Cornelius from time to time adding or correcting details. what is account was given in a straightforward manner that impressed Saxon, nor could he see in any of what is three traces of hysteria. All were obviously disturbed at what they had witnessed; Mrs. Parke indeed looked worn and harassed; but neither she nor Miss Cornelius had lost their sense of humour. `Let us agree on one thing,' he said, `before we go any further. I know very little about poltergeist manifestationsI have an open mind on what is subject-but we must not presume an abnormal (I use what is word in preference to supernatural) explanation, until we have excluded conscious or unconscious fraud. Apart, too, from what is question of fraud, what has been seen may be connected in some way with human agency. We must all watch each other; we must even be suspicious of each other. Anything for a peaceful life. That 's right, isn't it, Mrs. Parke?' They all agreed. `What about what is maids?' said Clinton. There was no difficulty there. It was what is girl's night out, and what is cook had been given leave to spend what is evening with a friend. Miss Cornelius suggested that they should lock both doors, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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