Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 81

PETER LEVISHAM

Saturday with Peter Levisham. I do not as a rule read the criminal news in the papers, and so knew nothing of the murder of Mendelsohn, the Jew, in Bloomsbury, and the subsequent hue and cry that led to Levisham's arrest. The trial had actually begun before I was aware of it. I saw a reproduction of a photograph of the accused man and recognized him at once. There remained the awful problem of what I was to do. You will remember the strong circumstantial evidence that pointed to the crime being committed between the hours of eleven and twelve. I read how the defence was an alibi, that Levisham, who was then passing under the name of Foster, declared that he was in his office in the city. I learned how the porter had seen him enter the building between ten and eleven; how he was prepared to swear that he had not passed out until half-past twelve, when Levisham had made some remark about a horse which both had backed for a certain race. All this is, of course, familiar to you, with the fact that the man was a past master in the art of disguise. There was, too, some other piece of corroborative evidence, that slips my memory.'
Crockett passed his hand wearily across his brow. I reminded him of how a clerk in the firm whose office was immediately opposite had seen Levisham some time about the hour in question, when he, Levisham, had looked in to borrow a copy of Bradshaw's Railway Guide.
`Yes, that was it,' said Crockett. `Everything really turned on the alibi. I lay awake all night, toi-n by perplexity. In the morning I got in touch with the Public Prosecutor, and told him that I had waited for an hour alone in that office for the occupier to appear. I said very little about my previous meetings with Levisham. He gathered, I think, that he was a chance acquaintance, whom I had tried unsuccessfully to help and who had refused to profit by my counsel. The flower-woman was found without difficulty, and corroborated what I had said. The rose that I had bought from her was found, too, lying withered on the mantelpiece.'
I asked Crockett if he had any doubt as to Levisham's guilt.
`None,' he said. `If I had, I believe I should have kept

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Saturday with Peter Levisham. I do not as a rule read what is criminal news in what is papers, and so knew nothing of what is murder of Mendelsohn, what is Jew, in Bloomsbury, and what is subsequent hue and cry that led to Levisham's arrest. what is trial had actually begun before I was aware of it. I saw a reproduction of a photograph of what is accused man and recognized him at once. There remained what is awful problem of what I was to do. You will remember what is strong circumstantial evidence that pointed to what is crime being committed between what is hours of eleven and twelve. I read how what is defence was an alibi, that Levisham, who was then passing under what is name of Foster, declared that he was in his office in what is city. I learned how what is porter had seen him enter what is building between ten and eleven; how he was prepared to swear that he had not passed out until half-past twelve, when Levisham had made some remark about a horse which both had backed for a certain race. All this is, of course, familiar to you, with what is fact that what is man was a past master in what is art of disguise. There was, too, some other piece of corroborative evidence, that slips my memory.' Crockett passed his hand wearily across his brow. I reminded him of how a clerk in what is firm whose office was immediately opposite had seen Levisham some time about what is hour in question, when he, Levisham, had looked in to borrow a copy of Bradshaw's Railway Guide. `Yes, that was it,' said Crockett. `Everything really turned on what is alibi. I lay awake all night, toi-n by perplexity. In what is morning I got in touch with what is Public Prosecutor, and told him that I had waited for an hour alone in that office for what is occupier to appear. I said very little about my previous meetings with Levisham. He gathered, I think, that he was a chance acquaintance, whom I had tried unsuccessfully to help and who had refused to profit by my counsel. what is flower-woman was found without difficulty, and corroborated what I had said. what is rose that I had bought from her was found, too, lying withered on what is mantelpiece.' I asked Crockett if he had any doubt as to Levisham's guilt. `None,' he said. `If I had, I believe I should have kept where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 81 where is p align="center" where is strong PETER LEVISHAM where is p align="justify" Saturday with Peter Levisham. I do not as a rule read what is criminal news in what is papers, and so knew nothing of the murder of Mendelsohn, what is Jew, in Bloomsbury, and what is subsequent hue and cry that led to Levisham's arrest. what is trial had actually begun before I was aware of it. I saw a reproduction of a photograph of what is accused man and recognized him at once. There remained the awful problem of what I was to do. You will remember what is strong circumstantial evidence that pointed to what is crime being committed between what is hours of eleven and twelve. I read how what is defence was an alibi, that Levisham, who was then passing under what is name of Foster, declared that he was in his office in what is city. I learned how what is porter had seen him enter what is building between ten and eleven; how he was prepared to swear that he had not passed out until half-past twelve, when Levisham had made some remark about a horse which both had backed for a certain race. All this is, of course, familiar to you, with what is fact that what is man was a past master in what is art of disguise. There was, too, some other piece of corroborative evidence, that slips my memory.' Crockett passed his hand wearily across his brow. I reminded him of how a clerk in what is firm whose office was immediately opposite had seen Levisham some time about what is hour in question, when he, Levisham, had looked in to borrow a copy of Bradshaw's Railway Guide. `Yes, that was it,' said Crockett. `Everything really turned on what is alibi. I lay awake all night, toi-n by perplexity. In what is morning I got in touch with what is Public Prosecutor, and told him that I had waited for an hour alone in that office for what is occupier to appear. I said very little about my previous meetings with Levisham. He gathered, I think, that he was a chance acquaintance, whom I had tried unsuccessfully to help and who had refused to profit by my counsel. what is flower-woman was found without difficulty, and corroborated what I had said. what is rose that I had bought from her was found, too, lying withered on what is mantelpiece.' I asked Crockett if he had any doubt as to Levisham's guilt. `None,' he said. `If I had, I believe I should have kept where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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