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Page 78

PETER LEVISHAM

attention to the fact that the woods were private property, and that trespassers would be prosecuted with the utmost rigour of the law. I sat with my back against the post, and did not see the man who came down the path from the wood until he was climbing the stile. He was of middle height, bearded, aged perhaps fifty. From his dress I took him to be a Nonconformist minister. He wished me good day and then, as he read the notice, burst out laughing.
" 'How typically British," he said. "Here have I been walking for an hour through the wood with no one to say me nay, only to find on gaining the high road that the path is private and that I am subject to the utmost rigour of the law! Why could not they have put a notice-board at both ends of the path? Isn't it just as reasonable to approach the road from the wood as the wood from the road? The warning, like most warnings, has come too late." As he spoke, a curious sensation of fear seemed to come over me; I felt cold; my limbs began to tremble.
" `You are not well," he said. "What is the matter?"
`While he was speaking, I knew that he was the same man whom I had met on the two occasions I have described to you, I rose to my feet. The bull-terrier, the companion of my walk, had been investigating a rabbit-burrow, but seeing that at last I was moving, he trotted up to me; round the bend of the road came a wagon loaded high with corn.
" ` I don't know your name," I said, "but I have met you twice before, once in the traffic of Bishopsgate, and once on a winter night when I spoke to you at the Driflield cross-roads. I beseech you to listen to this warning before it is too late and see to your ways."
`He turned round on me in a flash with a dark scowl on his face, and burst into a torrent of vile abuse. I believe he would have laid hands on me but for the dog, and the fact that the wagoner was within fifty yards of us. It was in the company of the wagoner that I walked back to PoPlock. The stranger followed us in the distance for about a quarter of a mile, and then turned off down a lane that led to Minehead. I still

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE attention to what is fact that what is woods were private property, and that trespassers would be prosecuted with what is utmost rigour of what is law. I sat with my back against what is post, and did not see what is man who came down what is path from what is wood until he was climbing what is stile. He was of middle height, bearded, aged perhaps fifty. From his dress I took him to be a Nonconformist minister. He wished me good day and then, as he read what is notice, burst out laughing. "'How typically British," he said. "Here have I been walking for an hour through what is wood with no one to say me nay, only to find on gaining what is high road that what is path is private and that I am subject to what is utmost rigour of what is law! Why could not they have put a notice-board at both ends of what is path? Isn't it just as reasonable to approach what is road from what is wood as what is wood from what is road? what is warning, like most warnings, has come too late." As he spoke, a curious sensation of fear seemed to come over me; I felt cold; my limbs began to tremble. "`You are not well," he said. "What is what is matter?" `While he was speaking, I knew that he was what is same man whom I had met on what is two occasions I have described to you, I rose to my feet. what is bull-terrier, what is companion of my walk, had been investigating a rabbit-burrow, but seeing that at last I was moving, he trotted up to me; round what is bend of what is road came a wagon loaded high with corn. "` I don't know your name," I said, "but I have met you twice before, once in what is traffic of Bishopsgate, and once on a winter night when I spoke to you at what is Driflield cross-roads. I beseech you to listen to this warning before it is too late and see to your ways." `He turned round on me in a flash with a dark scowl on his face, and burst into a torrent of vile abuse. I believe he would have laid hands on me but for what is dog, and what is fact that what is wagoner was within fifty yards of us. It was in what is company of what is wagoner that I walked back to PoPlock. what is stranger followed us in what is distance for about a quarter of a mile, and then turned off down a lane that led to Minehead. I still where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 78 where is p align="center" where is strong PETER LEVISHAM where is p align="justify" attention to what is fact that what is woods were private property, and that trespassers would be prosecuted with what is utmost rigour of what is law. I sat with my back against what is post, and did not see what is man who came down what is path from what is wood until he was climbing what is stile. He was of middle height, bearded, aged perhaps fifty. From his dress I took him to be a Nonconformist minister. He wished me good day and then, as he read what is notice, burst out laughing. " 'How typically British," he said. "Here have I been walking for an hour through what is wood with no one to say me nay, only to find on gaining what is high road that what is path is private and that I am subject to what is utmost rigour of what is law! Why could not they have put a notice-board at both ends of what is path? Isn't it just as reasonable to approach what is road from what is wood as what is wood from what is road? what is warning, like most warnings, has come too late." As he spoke, a curious sensation of fear seemed to come over me; I felt cold; my limbs began to tremble. " `You are not well," he said. "What is what is matter?" `While he was speaking, I knew that he was what is same man whom I had met on what is two occasions I have described to you, I rose to my feet. what is bull-terrier, what is companion of my walk, had been investigating a rabbit-burrow, but seeing that at last I was moving, he trotted up to me; round what is bend of what is road came a wagon loaded high with corn. " ` I don't know your name," I said, "but I have met you twice before, once in what is traffic of Bishopsgate, and once on a winter night when I spoke to you at what is Driflield cross-roads. I beseech you to listen to this warning before it is too late and see to your ways." `He turned round on me in a flash with a dark scowl on his face, and burst into a torrent of vile abuse. I believe he would have laid hands on me but for what is dog, and what is fact that what is wagoner was within fifty yards of us. It was in what is company of what is wagoner that I walked back to PoPlock. what is stranger followed us in the distance for about a quarter of a mile, and then turned off down a lane that led to Minehead. I still where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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