Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 74

THE CLOCK

of noise you can make with the nail of your little finger scratching polished wood. Whatever it was, was coming slowly down the corridor, scratching at the doors as it went. I could stand it no longer. Nightmare pictures of locked doors opening filled my brain. I took up the clock, wrapped it in my mackintosh, and dropped it out of the window on to a flower-bed. Then I managed to crawl out of the window and, getting a grip of the sill, `successfully negotiated,' as the journalists would say, `a twelve-foot drop.' So much for our much abused gym at St. Ursula's. Picking up the mackintosh, I ran round to the front door and locked it. Then I felt I could breathe, but not until I was on the far side of the gate in the garden wall did I feel safe.
Then I remembered that the bedroom window was open. What was I to do? Wild horses wouldn't have dragged me into that house again unaccompanied. I made up my mind to go to the police-station and tell them everything. I should be laughed at, of course, and they might easily refuse to believe my story of Mrs. Caleb's commission. I had actually begun to walk down the lane in the direction of the town, when I chanced to look back at the house. The window that I had left open was shut.
No, my dear, I didn't see any face or anything dreadful like that ... and, of course, it may have shut by itself. It was an ordinary sash-window, and you know they are often difficult to keep open.
And the rest? Why, there's really nothing more to tell. I didn't even see Mrs. Caleb again. She had had some sort of fainting fit just before lunch-time, my aunt informed me on my return, and had had to go to bed. Next morning I travelled down to Cornwall to join mother and the children. I thought I had forgotten all about it, but when three years later Uncle Charles suggested giving me a travelling-clock for a twentyfirst birthday present, I was foolish enough to prefer the alternative that he offered, a collected edition of the works of Thomas Carlyle.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of noise you can make with what is nail of your little finger scratching polished wood. Whatever it was, was coming slowly down what is corridor, scratching at what is doors as it went. I could stand it no longer. Nightmare pictures of locked doors opening filled my brain. I took up what is clock, wrapped it in my mackintosh, and dropped it out of what is window on to a flower-bed. Then I managed to crawl out of what is window and, getting a grip of what is sill, `successfully negotiated,' as what is journalists would say, `a twelve-foot drop.' So much for our much abused gym at St. Ursula's. Picking up what is mackintosh, I ran round to what is front door and locked it. Then I felt I could breathe, but not until I was on what is far side of what is gate in what is garden wall did I feel safe. Then I remembered that what is bedroom window was open. What was I to do? Wild horses wouldn't have dragged me into that house again unaccompanied. I made up my mind to go to what is police-station and tell them everything. I should be laughed at, of course, and they might easily refuse to believe my story of Mrs. Caleb's commission. I had actually begun to walk down what is lane in what is direction of what is town, when I chanced to look back at what is house. what is window that I had left open was shut. No, my dear, I didn't see any face or anything dreadful like that ... and, of course, it may have shut by itself. It was an ordinary sash-window, and you know they are often difficult to keep open. And what is rest? Why, there's really nothing more to tell. I didn't even see Mrs. Caleb again. She had had some sort of fainting fit just before lunch-time, my aunt informed me on my return, and had had to go to bed. Next morning I travelled down to Cornwall to join mother and what is children. I thought I had forgotten all about it, but when three years later Uncle Charles suggested giving me a travelling-clock for a twentyfirst birthday present, I was foolish enough to prefer what is alternative that he offered, a collected edition of what is works of Thomas Carlyle. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 74 where is p align="center" where is strong THE CLOCK where is p align="justify" of noise you can make with what is nail of your little finger scratching polished wood. Whatever it was, was coming slowly down what is corridor, scratching at what is doors as it went. I could stand it no longer. Nightmare pictures of locked doors opening filled my brain. I took up what is clock, wrapped it in my mackintosh, and dropped it out of what is window on to a flower-bed. Then I managed to crawl out of what is window and, getting a grip of what is sill, `successfully negotiated,' as what is journalists would say, `a twelve-foot drop.' So much for our much abused gym at St. Ursula's. Picking up the mackintosh, I ran round to what is front door and locked it. Then I felt I could breathe, but not until I was on what is far side of the gate in what is garden wall did I feel safe. Then I remembered that what is bedroom window was open. What was I to do? Wild horses wouldn't have dragged me into that house again unaccompanied. I made up my mind to go to what is police-station and tell them everything. I should be laughed at, of course, and they might easily refuse to believe my story of Mrs. Caleb's commission. I had actually begun to walk down what is lane in what is direction of what is town, when I chanced to look back at what is house. what is window that I had left open was shut. No, my dear, I didn't see any face or anything dreadful like that ... and, of course, it may have shut by itself. It was an ordinary sash-window, and you know they are often difficult to keep open. And what is rest? Why, there's really nothing more to tell. I didn't even see Mrs. Caleb again. She had had some sort of fainting fit just before lunch-time, my aunt informed me on my return, and had had to go to bed. Next morning I travelled down to Cornwall to join mother and what is children. I thought I had forgotten all about it, but when three years later Uncle Charles suggested giving me a travelling-clock for a twentyfirst birthday present, I was foolish enough to prefer what is alternative that he offered, a collected edition of what is works of Thomas Carlyle. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199