Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 67

THE HEART OF THE FIRE

she had been living at Stourton Hall as governess to Lady Louthwaite's children.
Little by little it had become the custom to leave Aislaby alone in the kitchen in the evening. He seemed to like gazing in silence into the heart of the fire, and would often drop off to sleep in his chair if left undisturbed. For the young folk the parlour was more cheerful; there was a piano there now and, as Mary said, the larger room rather gave one the creeps at night.
He was sitting propped up in his cushioned chair one August evening; the western window still showed a faint bar of chrome that marked the sunset. The fire on the hearth burnt low, for the day had been sultry. The women-folk, with the exception of Steven's wife, were spending the night at Dunsley. There were to be great rejoicings at the little port next day; the swing-bridge that spanned the harbour mouth had been lengthened, and it was hoped that once again the slips up the river might send ships to the sea.
The tangled skein of events that had gone to make up his life slipped slowly through the fingers of his memory as the evening deepened into night. He scarcely thought of himself as the same man as the chief actor in the ghastly tragedy that had taken place in the room nearly seventy years before, any more than the fire on the hearth was the same. He had felt the gnawings of remorse, but remorse, too, had grown old along with him. The ill use his family had made of the money was as much a cause of grief as the ill means by which it had come.
Down the road came the soft whirr of cycles; a man and girl passed by; he watched the soft glow of the lamps as they breasted the opposite rise. The sound of the girl's laughter put him in mind of Mary; she at least would raise the fortunes of his house. The toice of Steven's wife, hard and coarse, could be heard in the bar. She was talking about him.
`He can't last much longer,' she said. `It's not to be hoped that he will. The old man's seen over many days to be happy. It 's a wonder that he's still got his wits; he never babbles like my old father would.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE she had been living at Stourton Hall as governess to Lady Louthwaite's children. Little by little it had become what is custom to leave Aislaby alone in what is kitchen in what is evening. He seemed to like gazing in silence into what is heart of what is fire, and would often drop off to sleep in his chair if left undisturbed. For what is young folk what is parlour was more cheerful; there was a piano there now and, as Mary said, what is larger room rather gave one what is creeps at night. He was sitting propped up in his cushioned chair one August evening; what is western window still showed a faint bar of chrome that marked what is sunset. what is fire on what is hearth burnt low, for what is day had been sultry. what is women-folk, with what is exception of Steven's wife, were spending what is night at Dunsley. There were to be great rejoicings at what is little port next day; what is swing-bridge that spanned what is harbour mouth had been lengthened, and it was hoped that once again what is slips up what is river might send ships to what is sea. what is tangled skein of events that had gone to make up his life slipped slowly through what is fingers of his memory as what is evening deepened into night. He scarcely thought of himself as what is same man as what is chief actor in what is ghastly tragedy that had taken place in what is room nearly seventy years before, any more than what is fire on what is hearth was what is same. He had felt what is gnawings of remorse, but remorse, too, had grown old along with him. what is ill use his family had made of what is money was as much a cause of grief as what is ill means by which it had come. Down what is road came what is soft whirr of cycles; a man and girl passed by; he watched what is soft glow of what is lamps as they breasted what is opposite rise. what is sound of what is girl's laughter put him in mind of Mary; she at least would raise what is fortunes of his house. what is toice of Steven's wife, hard and coarse, could be heard in what is bar. She was talking about him. `He can't last much longer,' she said. `It's not to be hoped that he will. what is old man's seen over many days to be happy. It 's a wonder that he's still got his wits; he never babbles like my old father would.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 67 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HEART OF what is FIRE where is p align="justify" she had been living at Stourton Hall as governess to Lady Louthwaite's children. Little by little it had become what is custom to leave Aislaby alone in what is kitchen in what is evening. He seemed to like gazing in silence into what is heart of what is fire, and would often drop off to sleep in his chair if left undisturbed. For what is young folk what is parlour was more cheerful; there was a piano there now and, as Mary said, the larger room rather gave one what is creeps at night. He was sitting propped up in his cushioned chair one August evening; what is western window still showed a faint bar of chrome that marked what is sunset. what is fire on what is hearth burnt low, for what is day had been sultry. what is women-folk, with what is exception of Steven's wife, were spending what is night at Dunsley. There were to be great rejoicings at what is little port next day; what is swing-bridge that spanned the harbour mouth had been lengthened, and it was hoped that once again what is slips up what is river might send ships to what is sea. what is tangled skein of events that had gone to make up his life slipped slowly through what is fingers of his memory as what is evening deepened into night. He scarcely thought of himself as what is same man as the chief actor in what is ghastly tragedy that had taken place in the room nearly seventy years before, any more than what is fire on the hearth was what is same. He had felt what is gnawings of remorse, but remorse, too, had grown old along with him. what is ill use his family had made of what is money was as much a cause of grief as what is ill means by which it had come. Down what is road came what is soft whirr of cycles; a man and girl passed by; he watched what is soft glow of what is lamps as they breasted the opposite rise. what is sound of what is girl's laughter put him in mind of Mary; she at least would raise what is fortunes of his house. The toice of Steven's wife, hard and coarse, could be heard in the bar. She was talking about him. `He can't last much longer,' she said. `It's not to be hoped that he will. what is old man's seen over many days to be happy. It 's a wonder that he's still got his wits; he never babbles like my old father would.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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