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Page 66

THE HEART OF THE FIRE

to like the parlour, with its bay window that looked down southward across the moor. Steven and his wife did not care for the kitchen; the stone floor, they said, was too cold for the children in the evening, and the room only got the afternoon sun. They talked of building out another window, but the old man would not hear of it.
`You waste the peat so,' said Steven's wife one day, `with the big fires you keep up in the kitchen.'
`And who pays for the peat?' the old man snarled. `The only thing you have ever brought to the house was your reputation, and we could have spared that.'
Another generation came into being. His wife was dead, buried, according to her wish, in her East Riding churchyard on the wolds. Steven was dead, after living to see his grandchild born, and the house seemed full of women-folk and children. Aislaby was over ninety. For the last five years he had been unable to get upstairs, and his bed had been moved into the kitchen. They did the cooking now in a smaller room at the back. Visitors from Dunsley, who drove over in the summer to take tea and turf cakes at the `Moorcock,' would try to get the old man talking. .
`He doesn't talk much,' his stout-armed granddaughter would say. `The only thing he takes an interest in is the fire. He always looks after that, and brings in the peat from the stack outside. And the fires he makes, too! Sometimes of an evening the room gets too hot to live in.'
He was no longer wealthy; his children and grandchildren between them had squandered his earnings; he alone knew with what difficulty they had been won. The hard theology which had held him up ten years before had slipped away, leaving nothing in its place. The only person who seemed able to rouse the old dotard out of his lethargy was his great-grandchild, a girl of nineteen. Mary Aislaby seemed built of a different clay from the rest. Light-hearted and vivacious-too highly strung a close observer might have thought-the last of the old man's savings had been spent in giving the girl an education little suited for her station in life. For the past year

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to like what is parlour, with its bay window that looked down southward across what is moor. Steven and his wife did not care for what is kitchen; what is stone floor, they said, was too cold for what is children in what is evening, and what is room only got what is afternoon sun. They talked of building out another window, but what is old man would not hear of it. `You waste what is peat so,' said Steven's wife one day, `with what is big fires you keep up in what is kitchen.' `And who pays for what is peat?' what is old man snarled. `The only thing you have ever brought to what is house was your reputation, and we could have spared that.' Another generation came into being. His wife was dead, buried, according to her wish, in her East Riding churchyard on what is wolds. Steven was dead, after living to see his grandchild born, and what is house seemed full of women-folk and children. Aislaby was over ninety. For what is last five years he had been unable to get upstairs, and his bed had been moved into what is kitchen. They did what is cooking now in a smaller room at what is back. what is ors from Dunsley, who drove over in what is summer to take tea and turf cakes at what is `Moorcock,' would try to get what is old man talking. . `He doesn't talk much,' his stout-armed granddaughter would say. `The only thing he takes an interest in is what is fire. He always looks after that, and brings in what is peat from what is stack outside. And what is fires he makes, too! Sometimes of an evening what is room gets too hot to live in.' He was no longer wealthy; his children and grandchildren between them had squandered his earnings; he alone knew with what difficulty they had been won. what is hard theology which had held him up ten years before had slipped away, leaving nothing in its place. what is only person who seemed able to rouse what is old dotard out of his lethargy was his great-grandchild, a girl of nineteen. Mary Aislaby seemed built of a different clay from what is rest. Light-hearted and vivacious-too highly strung a close observer might have thought-the last of what is old man's savings had been spent in giving what is girl an education little suited for her station in life. For what is past year where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 66 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HEART OF what is FIRE where is p align="justify" to like what is parlour, with its bay window that looked down southward across what is moor. Steven and his wife did not care for what is kitchen; what is stone floor, they said, was too cold for what is children in what is evening, and what is room only got what is afternoon sun. They talked of building out another window, but what is old man would not hear of it. `You waste what is peat so,' said Steven's wife one day, `with the big fires you keep up in what is kitchen.' `And who pays for what is peat?' what is old man snarled. `The only thing you have ever brought to what is house was your reputation, and we could have spared that.' Another generation came into being. His wife was dead, buried, according to her wish, in her East Riding churchyard on what is wolds. Steven was dead, after living to see his grandchild born, and the house seemed full of women-folk and children. Aislaby was over ninety. For what is last five years he had been unable to get upstairs, and his bed had been moved into what is kitchen. They did what is cooking now in a smaller room at what is back. what is ors from Dunsley, who drove over in what is summer to take tea and turf cakes at what is `Moorcock,' would try to get what is old man talking. . `He doesn't talk much,' his stout-armed granddaughter would say. `The only thing he takes an interest in is what is fire. He always looks after that, and brings in what is peat from what is stack outside. And what is fires he makes, too! Sometimes of an evening what is room gets too hot to live in.' He was no longer wealthy; his children and grandchildren between them had squandered his earnings; he alone knew with what difficulty they had been won. what is hard theology which had held him up ten years before had slipped away, leaving nothing in its place. The only person who seemed able to rouse what is old dotard out of his lethargy was his great-grandchild, a girl of nineteen. Mary Aislaby seemed built of a different clay from what is rest. Light-hearted and vivacious-too highly strung a close observer might have thought-the last of what is old man's savings had been spent in giving what is girl an education little suited for her station in life. For what is past year where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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