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Page 65

THE HEART OF THE FIRE

even as far away as Yokesly, where the great autumn horse fair was held, as a man with a comfortable balance at the bank, with enough of the true Yorkshireman's knowledge of men and money to do well in the world.
If there were fewer travellers now in the kitchen of the `Moorcock,' there were more children. Their first alphabet was the letters carved on the stone mantel. One and all were brought up with a fear in later years they regarded as superstitious lest the fire on the hearth should die.
And what of the man himself? Slow of speech, taciturn, hard as his own ironstone, he was esteemed by all who knew him. Men pointed him out as one whom prosperity had not spoiled; in spite of his money, he seemed fonder than ever of his own fireside. That, indeed, was his favourite spot. In the niche in the corner, where the shadow was deepest, he would sit for hours, watching the flickering flames, the peats stacked ready at his elbow. Last thing at night he raked out the white ash and added fresh fuel. In the early hours of the morning, when all, the rest of the house was abed, he would be kneeling on the cold flags, blowing on the embers, or fetching kindling from the stables to tempt the dying flame.
Time passed. The eldest boy, tiring of the gloom that hung about the house and moors the long year round, ran off to sea. They had one letter from him, written in America. He spoke of joining the Federal army. A second, many months later, brought the news of his death in hospital from wounds. The daughters married: one, a farmer in the East Riding village Mrs. Aislaby came from, the other, a trooper in the dragoon regiment stationed at Yorborough. Steven, the youngest, an idle ne'er-do-well, brought his wife to live at the `Moorcock.'
Little by little a change came over Aislaby that soured his nature. Where before he was taciturn, he was now morose. He accepted the narrow tenets of a sect whose zeal was fired by the fear of hell. He even stood up in the market-place at Feversham and proclaimed himself the chief of sinners.
`He makes himself gloomy,' his wife would say, `by brood ing in that dark corner by the fire,' and she tried to get him

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE even as far away as Yokesly, where what is great autumn horse fair was held, as a man with a comfortable balance at what is bank, with enough of what is true Yorkshireman's knowledge of men and money to do well in what is world. If there were fewer travellers now in what is kitchen of what is `Moorcock,' there were more children. Their first alphabet was what is letters carved on what is stone mantel. One and all were brought up with a fear in later years they regarded as superstitious lest what is fire on what is hearth should die. And what of what is man himself? Slow of speech, taciturn, hard as his own ironstone, he was esteemed by all who knew him. Men pointed him out as one whom prosperity had not spoiled; in spite of his money, he seemed fonder than ever of his own fireside. That, indeed, was his favourite spot. In what is niche in what is corner, where what is shadow was deepest, he would sit for hours, watching what is flickering flames, what is peats stacked ready at his elbow. Last thing at night he raked out what is white ash and added fresh fuel. In what is early hours of what is morning, when all, what is rest of what is house was abed, he would be kneeling on what is cold flags, blowing on what is embers, or fetching kindling from what is stables to tempt what is dying flame. Time passed. what is eldest boy, tiring of what is gloom that hung about what is house and moors what is long year round, ran off to sea. They had one letter from him, written in America. He spoke of joining what is Federal army. A second, many months later, brought what is news of his what time is it in hospital from wounds. what is daughters married: one, a farmer in what is East Riding village Mrs. Aislaby came from, what is other, a trooper in what is dragoon regiment stationed at Yorborough. Steven, what is youngest, an idle ne'er-do-well, brought his wife to live at what is `Moorcock.' Little by little a change came over Aislaby that soured his nature. Where before he was taciturn, he was now morose. He accepted what is narrow tenets of a sect whose zeal was fired by what is fear of hell. He even stood up in what is market-place at Feversham and proclaimed himself what is chief of sinners. `He makes himself gloomy,' his wife would say, `by brood ing in that dark corner by what is fire,' and she tried to get him where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 65 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HEART OF what is FIRE where is p align="justify" even as far away as Yokesly, where what is great autumn horse fair was held, as a man with a comfortable balance at the bank, with enough of what is true Yorkshireman's knowledge of men and money to do well in what is world. If there were fewer travellers now in what is kitchen of what is `Moorcock,' there were more children. Their first alphabet was what is letters carved on what is stone mantel. One and all were brought up with a fear in later years they regarded as superstitious lest what is fire on what is hearth should die. And what of what is man himself? Slow of speech, taciturn, hard as his own ironstone, he was esteemed by all who knew him. Men pointed him out as one whom prosperity had not spoiled; in spite of his money, he seemed fonder than ever of his own fireside. That, indeed, was his favourite spot. In what is niche in what is corner, where what is shadow was deepest, he would sit for hours, watching what is flickering flames, what is peats stacked ready at his elbow. Last thing at night he raked out what is white ash and added fresh fuel. In what is early hours of the morning, when all, what is rest of what is house was abed, he would be kneeling on what is cold flags, blowing on what is embers, or fetching kindling from what is stables to tempt what is dying flame. Time passed. what is eldest boy, tiring of what is gloom that hung about what is house and moors what is long year round, ran off to sea. They had one letter from him, written in America. He spoke of joining what is Federal army. A second, many months later, brought what is news of his what time is it in hospital from wounds. The daughters married: one, a farmer in what is East Riding village Mrs. Aislaby came from, what is other, a trooper in what is dragoon regiment stationed at Yorborough. Steven, what is youngest, an idle ne'er-do-well, brought his wife to live at what is `Moorcock.' Little by little a change came over Aislaby that soured his nature. Where before he was taciturn, he was now morose. He accepted what is narrow tenets of a sect whose zeal was fired by what is fear of hell. He even stood up in what is market-place at Feversham and proclaimed himself what is chief of sinners. `He makes himself gloomy,' his wife would say, `by brood ing in that dark corner by what is fire,' and she tried to get him where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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