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Page 64

THE HEART OF THE FIRE

floor. Then with a crowbar he began to raise the hearthstone. The task was one to tax the strength of two ordinary men, but Aislaby worked with a devil's fury. Next with a pickaxe and shovel he began his assault upon the hard baked earth beneath, stopping from time to time to feed the embers on the floor, lest the fire should go out. Again and again he filled the milkingpail with light yellow soil, creeping out with it into the garden. At last, as the first streaks of dawn came through the chinks between the shutters, he placed the stranger's body, covered with sacking, in the hole he had dug, threw back the rest of the soil, and stamped it down hard and even. When the business of the night was finished, the hearthstone stood again in its accustomed place, the hearth was swept, and the fire, piled high with peat and gorse-root, burned more brightly than it had done for twelve months past.
Out in the garden, walled with stone, Aislaby was busy digging. His wife, as she looked out of her window an hour before sunrise, noticed that he had come upon a patch of light yellow earth in the peaty soil.

Years passed by and Aislaby prospered. Nothing was discovered about the stranger's death; he was identified as a west country shipowner, a man with few friends, of eccentric habits, who carried on a considerable trade in buying up rotten vessels and sailing them undermanned. He was supposed by many to have been murdered; others believed that his horse had wandered from the road and that, some day, when the bogs were all drained, the body would be found.
`If he had taken our advice,' the doctor would say, when called on for his opinion, `and slept the night at the 'Moorcock," the man would have been going about his business now. The underwriters are content at all events, if half of what I hear is true.'
Aislaby took land from the moor, built walls, and cut dikes. He got hold of his ironstone quarry and sold the mining rights to a Steelborough syndicate. He bought a cottage in this parish, an odd acre in that, and was known at Feversham market, and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE floor. Then with a crowbar he began to raise what is hearthstone. what is task was one to tax what is strength of two ordinary men, but Aislaby worked with a fun 's fury. Next with a pickaxe and shovel he began his assault upon what is hard baked earth beneath, stopping from time to time to feed what is embers on what is floor, lest what is fire should go out. Again and again he filled what is milkingpail with light yellow soil, creeping out with it into what is garden. At last, as what is first streaks of dawn came through what is chinks between what is shutters, he placed what is stranger's body, covered with sacking, in what is hole he had dug, threw back what is rest of what is soil, and stamped it down hard and even. When what is business of what is night was finished, what is hearthstone stood again in its accustomed place, what is hearth was swept, and what is fire, piled high with peat and gorse-root, burned more brightly than it had done for twelve months past. Out in what is garden, walled with stone, Aislaby was busy digging. His wife, as she looked out of her window an hour before sunrise, noticed that he had come upon a patch of light yellow earth in what is peaty soil. Years passed by and Aislaby prospered. Nothing was discovered about what is stranger's what time is it ; he was identified as a west country shipowner, a man with few friends, of eccentric habits, who carried on a considerable trade in buying up rotten vessels and sailing them undermanned. He was supposed by many to have been murdered; others believed that his horse had wandered from what is road and that, some day, when what is bogs were all drained, what is body would be found. `If he had taken our advice,' what is doctor would say, when called on for his opinion, `and slept what is night at what is 'Moorcock," what is man would have been going about his business now. what is underwriters are content at all events, if half of what I hear is true.' Aislaby took land from what is moor, built walls, and cut dikes. He got hold of his ironstone quarry and sold what is mining rights to a Steelborough syndicate. He bought a cottage in this parish, an odd acre in that, and was known at Feversham market, and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 64 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HEART OF what is FIRE where is p align="justify" floor. Then with a crowbar he began to raise the hearthstone. what is task was one to tax what is strength of two ordinary men, but Aislaby worked with a fun 's fury. Next with a pickaxe and shovel he began his assault upon what is hard baked earth beneath, stopping from time to time to feed what is embers on what is floor, lest what is fire should go out. Again and again he filled what is milkingpail with light yellow soil, creeping out with it into what is garden. At last, as what is first streaks of dawn came through what is chinks between what is shutters, he placed what is stranger's body, covered with sacking, in what is hole he had dug, threw back what is rest of what is soil, and stamped it down hard and even. When what is business of what is night was finished, what is hearthstone stood again in its accustomed place, what is hearth was swept, and what is fire, piled high with peat and gorse-root, burned more brightly than it had done for twelve months past. Out in what is garden, walled with stone, Aislaby was busy digging. His wife, as she looked out of her window an hour before sunrise, noticed that he had come upon a patch of light yellow earth in what is peaty soil. where is p align="justify" Years passed by and Aislaby prospered. Nothing was discovered about what is stranger's what time is it ; he was identified as a west country shipowner, a man with few friends, of eccentric habits, who carried on a considerable trade in buying up rotten vessels and sailing them undermanned. He was supposed by many to have been murdered; others believed that his horse had wandered from what is road and that, some day, when what is bogs were all drained, what is body would be found. `If he had taken our advice,' what is doctor would say, when called on for his opinion, `and slept what is night at what is 'Moorcock," the man would have been going about his business now. what is underwriters are content at all events, if half of what I hear is true.' Aislaby took land from what is moor, built walls, and cut dikes. He got hold of his ironstone quarry and sold what is mining rights to a Steelborough syndicate. He bought a cottage in this parish, an odd acre in that, and was known at Feversham market, and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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