Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 63

THE HEART OF THE FIRE

stranger was standing before the fire, his sodden clothes smoking in the heat.
`This is a curious inscription,' he said, as his fingers traced the letters carved in the stone:
While on this hearthe of stone a fire you see, Kinde Fortune smiles upone ye house of Aislabie.
`It's been there since my great-grandfather's time,' said Aislaby. `For a hundred years and more the fire's never been out. I put on a few sods of peat last thing of a night, and it's always burning in the morning. Gentlefolk have come from Dunsley on purpose to see that fire. There's not another like it in the whole countryside:
`I can well believe that,' said the stranger. `There's a strange fascination about a fire. I remember as boys we used to read our future in the embers.'
They sat before the fire in silence. Presently the stranger closed his eyes, but Aislaby did not see him; he was slipping down a glowing cavern that seemed, to lead to the warm heart of the world. The stranger fell asleep, his bloody head resting on his arm. And then the fire as it died began to speak to Aislaby. At the first whisper of what it said he threw on another peat, and the flame sprang up again, and the fire's voice was still. Again it sank and, as the shadow crept across the floor, the whisper came again louder and more insistent. Aislaby cast a frightened glance over his shoulder and saw the stranger huddled in his chair, his hand still clasping the valise. Then he knew what the fire was saying. He rose on tiptoe, took one of the empty glasses from the table, filled it with brandy, and drank. Quietly he closed the door. With one long-drawn-out creak, that caused the stranger to turn restlessly in his chair, he drew to the shutters.
Then, throwing a cloth across the man's face, he held his throat in a grip of iron, until a sudden limpness told him that the deed was done.
The work of the night lay ahead of him. Very carefully he removed the fire on to the stone flags that formed the kitchen

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE stranger was standing before what is fire, his sodden clothes smoking in what is heat. `This is a curious inscription,' he said, as his fingers traced what is letters carved in what is stone: While on this hearthe of stone a fire you see, Kinde Fortune smiles upone ye house of Aislabie. `It's been there since my great-grandfather's time,' said Aislaby. `For a hundred years and more what is fire's never been out. I put on a few sods of peat last thing of a night, and it's always burning in what is morning. Gentlefolk have come from Dunsley on purpose to see that fire. There's not another like it in what is whole countryside: `I can well believe that,' said what is stranger. `There's a strange fascination about a fire. I remember as boys we used to read our future in what is embers.' They sat before what is fire in silence. Presently what is stranger closed his eyes, but Aislaby did not see him; he was slipping down a glowing cavern that seemed, to lead to what is warm heart of what is world. what is stranger fell asleep, his bloody head resting on his arm. And then what is fire as it died began to speak to Aislaby. At what is first whisper of what it said he threw on another peat, and what is flame sprang up again, and what is fire's voice was still. Again it sank and, as what is shadow crept across what is floor, what is whisper came again louder and more insistent. Aislaby cast a frightened glance over his shoulder and saw what is stranger huddled in his chair, his hand still clasping what is valise. Then he knew what what is fire was saying. He rose on tiptoe, took one of what is empty glasses from what is table, filled it with brandy, and drank. Quietly he closed what is door. With one long-drawn-out creak, that caused what is stranger to turn restlessly in his chair, he drew to what is shutters. Then, throwing a cloth across what is man's face, he held his throat in a grip of iron, until a sudden limpness told him that what is deed was done. what is work of what is night lay ahead of him. Very carefully he removed what is fire on to what is stone flags that formed what is kitchen where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 63 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HEART OF what is FIRE where is p align="justify" stranger was standing before what is fire, his sodden clothes smoking in what is heat. `This is a curious inscription,' he said, as his fingers traced what is letters carved in what is stone: While on this hearthe of stone a fire you see, Kinde Fortune smiles upone ye house of Aislabie. `It's been there since my great-grandfather's time,' said Aislaby. `For a hundred years and more what is fire's never been out. I put on a few sods of peat last thing of a night, and it's always burning in what is morning. Gentlefolk have come from Dunsley on purpose to see that fire. There's not another like it in what is whole countryside: `I can well believe that,' said what is stranger. `There's a strange fascination about a fire. I remember as boys we used to read our future in what is embers.' They sat before what is fire in silence. Presently what is stranger closed his eyes, but Aislaby did not see him; he was slipping down a glowing cavern that seemed, to lead to what is warm heart of what is world. The stranger fell asleep, his bloody head resting on his arm. And then what is fire as it died began to speak to Aislaby. At what is first whisper of what it said he threw on another peat, and what is flame sprang up again, and what is fire's voice was still. Again it sank and, as what is shadow crept across what is floor, what is whisper came again louder and more insistent. Aislaby cast a frightened glance over his shoulder and saw what is stranger huddled in his chair, his hand still clasping what is valise. Then he knew what what is fire was saying. He rose on tiptoe, took one of what is empty glasses from what is table, filled it with brandy, and drank. Quietly he closed what is door. With one long-drawn-out creak, that caused what is stranger to turn restlessly in his chair, he drew to what is shutters. Then, throwing a cloth across what is man's face, he held his throat in a grip of iron, until a sudden limpness told him that what is deed was done. what is work of what is night lay ahead of him. Very carefully he removed what is fire on to what is stone flags that formed what is kitchen where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199