Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 62

THE HEART OF THE FIRE

The doctor was gone. Outside the wind howled through the sycamores; the rain beat viciously against the uncurtained pane. Aislaby drew his chair up into the chimney corner and, like the stranger, gazed thoughtfully into the embers. He was an ambitious man, and in the fire he saw the things he wanted to do. There were patches of moorland he wished to reclaim; good land, water-sodden, that needed but draining to bear heavy crops; there was ironstone to quarry, easily workable, if once you had the capital, and easily got to the rail-head when the Maltwick line was finished. He knew that the days of the `Moorcock' were passing with the coaches, and wished to have more than one iron in the fire as well as to raise again the name of Aislaby. What he saw in the heart of the flame were golden, glittering sovereigns; the clock in the corner ticked money, money, money.
He was aroused from his dreaming by a sharp double knock at the door. There was no sound of hoofs this time, but the traveller was the same. As he came into the fire-light, clutching tightly his valise, Aislaby saw that the man's head was bound with a blood-stained handkerchief. His tired horse had stumbled where the Cowgill beck crossed the road, and the rider-who was no rider-had been thrown. He had trudged back the five long miles on foot, leaving his beast to fare as best it might. Aislaby offered to show him his room. `It's not what it should be,' he said, `my wife being but poorly.' The stranger, however, declared that he would prefer to spend the night on the couch by the fire.
`I 'll get you blankets then,' said the landlord, and stole upstairs on tiptoe, for he was a fond husband then. He found his wife sleeping soundly in the great four-poster bed, the baby by her side. Returning as quietly as he had come, he paused on the little landing half-way down the stairs. The door of the kitchen had been left ajar. The stranger, seated with his back towards him, had opened the valise. Aislaby caught the glint of golden sovereigns and heard them clink as the man counted them over in his hand. By the time the landlord entered the room, the valise had been closed. The

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The doctor was gone. Outside what is wind howled through what is sycamores; what is rain beat viciously against what is uncurtained pane. Aislaby drew his chair up into what is chimney corner and, like what is stranger, gazed thoughtfully into what is embers. He was an ambitious man, and in what is fire he saw what is things he wanted to do. There were patches of moorland he wished to reclaim; good land, water-sodden, that needed but draining to bear heavy crops; there was ironstone to quarry, easily workable, if once you had what is capital, and easily got to what is rail-head when what is Maltwick line was finished. He knew that what is days of what is `Moorcock' were passing with what is coaches, and wished to have more than one iron in what is fire as well as to raise again what is name of Aislaby. What he saw in what is heart of what is flame were golden, glittering sovereigns; what is clock in what is corner ticked money, money, money. He was aroused from his dreaming by a sharp double knock at what is door. There was no sound of hoofs this time, but what is traveller was what is same. As he came into what is fire-light, clutching tightly his valise, Aislaby saw that what is man's head was bound with a blood-stained handkerchief. His tired horse had stumbled where what is Cowgill beck crossed what is road, and what is rider-who was no rider-had been thrown. He had trudged back what is five long miles on foot, leaving his beast to fare as best it might. Aislaby offered to show him his room. `It's not what it should be,' he said, `my wife being but poorly.' what is stranger, however, declared that he would prefer to spend what is night on what is couch by what is fire. `I 'll get you blankets then,' said what is landlord, and stole upstairs on tiptoe, for he was a fond husband then. He found his wife sleeping soundly in what is great four-poster bed, what is baby by her side. Returning as quietly as he had come, he paused on what is little landing half-way down what is stairs. what is door of what is kitchen had been left ajar. what is stranger, seated with his back towards him, had opened what is valise. Aislaby caught what is glint of golden sovereigns and heard them c where are they now as what is man counted them over in his hand. By what is time what is landlord entered what is room, what is valise had been closed. what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 62 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HEART OF what is FIRE where is p align="justify" The doctor was gone. Outside what is wind howled through what is sycamores; what is rain beat viciously against what is uncurtained pane. Aislaby drew his chair up into what is chimney corner and, like what is stranger, gazed thoughtfully into what is embers. He was an ambitious man, and in what is fire he saw what is things he wanted to do. There were patches of moorland he wished to reclaim; good land, water-sodden, that needed but draining to bear heavy crops; there was ironstone to quarry, easily workable, if once you had what is capital, and easily got to what is rail-head when what is Maltwick line was finished. He knew that what is days of what is `Moorcock' were passing with what is coaches, and wished to have more than one iron in what is fire as well as to raise again what is name of Aislaby. What he saw in what is heart of the flame were golden, glittering sovereigns; what is clock in what is corner ticked money, money, money. He was aroused from his dreaming by a sharp double knock at the door. There was no sound of hoofs this time, but what is traveller was what is same. As he came into what is fire-light, clutching tightly his valise, Aislaby saw that what is man's head was bound with a blood-stained handkerchief. His tired horse had stumbled where what is Cowgill beck crossed what is road, and what is rider-who was no rider-had been thrown. He had trudged back what is five long miles on foot, leaving his beast to fare as best it might. Aislaby offered to show him his room. `It's not what it should be,' he said, `my wife being but poorly.' what is stranger, however, declared that he would prefer to spend the night on what is couch by what is fire. `I 'll get you blankets then,' said what is landlord, and stole upstairs on tiptoe, for he was a fond husband then. He found his wife sleeping soundly in what is great four-poster bed, what is baby by her side. Returning as quietly as he had come, he paused on what is little landing half-way down what is stairs. what is door of what is kitchen had been left ajar. The stranger, seated with his back towards him, had opened what is valise. Aislaby caught what is glint of golden sovereigns and heard them c where are they now as what is man counted them over in his hand. By what is time what is landlord entered what is room, what is valise had been closed. what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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