Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 61

THE HEART OF THE FIRE

He had passed one or two doubtful-looking characters on the way; was there any chance of the doctor's company on the road? The doctor regretted that he was going in the opposite direction. He advised the traveller, if a stranger to the district, to stop the night at the `Moorcock.' `This fire alone,' he said, `would make it worth your while.'
But the man was gazing into the embers with an absent expression of face, as if what he saw there only confirmed his fears.
`No,' he said at last, `I must get on; I have no time to waste. You, sir, will perhaps join me with a bottle of wine. It is wonderful what heart it puts into a man on nights like these.'
Aislaby, coming in from giving the horse a feed of oats, fetched wine and glasses. (There was good wine in those days in the cellars of the `Moorcock.') `You had better stay here the night,' he said; `you can start at dawn. The road's lonely enough for a townsman, and your horse seems ridden hard.'
But he would have none of it. He drank the wine, gulping it down as if it had been water, his eyes fixed all the while on the fire. Then, with a hurried `Good night' to the doctor, he paid his reckoning and was gone.
`Thank the Lord,' said Aislaby, `they're not all as surly as him'; and he drank what remained in the bottle. `It's little company we see here, as it is; a curse on his coffin-face.'
`Will you join me with a second bottle, Aislaby?' the doctor asked. `This is rare wine of yours. Yes; these moors are no place for lily-livered citizens like our friend. Between you and me that valise of his looked uncommonly heavy. If he feared robbery he would have been wiser to have slept here and gone on with the coach to-morrow afternoon. Well, well, I envy you your fire, Aislaby. If I were you, I should never leave it; but old men will die, and babies must be born, and time and tide wait for no man, not even for us doctors. Good night, Aislaby; your wife's doing famously. In ten years' time you won't be sitting here alone by the hearth, 1 'll wager.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He had passed one or two doubtful-looking characters on what is way; was there any chance of what is doctor's company on what is road? what is doctor regretted that he was going in what is opposite direction. He advised what is traveller, if a stranger to what is district, to stop what is night at what is `Moorcock.' `This fire alone,' he said, `would make it worth your while.' But what is man was gazing into what is embers with an absent expression of face, as if what he saw there only confirmed his fears. `No,' he said at last, `I must get on; I have no time to waste. You, sir, will perhaps join me with a bottle of wine. It is wonderful what heart it puts into a man on nights like these.' Aislaby, coming in from giving what is horse a feed of oats, fetched wine and glasses. (There was good wine in those days in what is cellars of what is `Moorcock.') `You had better stay here what is night,' he said; `you can start at dawn. what is road's lonely enough for a townsman, and your horse seems ridden hard.' But he would have none of it. He drank what is wine, gulping it down as if it had been water, his eyes fixed all what is while on what is fire. Then, with a hurried `Good night' to what is doctor, he paid his reckoning and was gone. `Thank what is Lord,' said Aislaby, `they're not all as surly as him'; and he drank what remained in what is bottle. `It's little company we see here, as it is; a curse on his coffin-face.' `Will you join me with a second bottle, Aislaby?' what is doctor asked. `This is rare wine of yours. Yes; these moors are no place for lily-livered citizens like our friend. Between you and me that valise of his looked uncommonly heavy. If he feared robbery he would have been wiser to have slept here and gone on with what is coach to-morrow afternoon. Well, well, I envy you your fire, Aislaby. If I were you, I should never leave it; but old men will die, and babies must be born, and time and tide wait for no man, not even for us doctors. Good night, Aislaby; your wife's doing famously. In ten years' time you won't be sitting here alone by what is hearth, 1 'll wager.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 61 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HEART OF what is FIRE where is p align="justify" He had passed one or two doubtful-looking characters on what is way; was there any chance of what is doctor's company on the road? what is doctor regretted that he was going in what is opposite direction. He advised what is traveller, if a stranger to what is district, to stop what is night at what is `Moorcock.' `This fire alone,' he said, `would make it worth your while.' But what is man was gazing into what is embers with an absent expression of face, as if what he saw there only confirmed his fears. `No,' he said at last, `I must get on; I have no time to waste. You, sir, will perhaps join me with a bottle of wine. It is wonderful what heart it puts into a man on nights like these.' Aislaby, coming in from giving what is horse a feed of oats, fetched wine and glasses. (There was good wine in those days in what is cellars of what is `Moorcock.') `You had better stay here what is night,' he said; `you can start at dawn. what is road's lonely enough for a townsman, and your horse seems ridden hard.' But he would have none of it. He drank what is wine, gulping it down as if it had been water, his eyes fixed all what is while on what is fire. Then, with a hurried `Good night' to what is doctor, he paid his reckoning and was gone. `Thank what is Lord,' said Aislaby, `they're not all as surly as him'; and he drank what remained in what is bottle. `It's little company we see here, as it is; a curse on his coffin-face.' `Will you join me with a second bottle, Aislaby?' what is doctor asked. `This is rare wine of yours. Yes; these moors are no place for lily-livered citizens like our friend. Between you and me that valise of his looked uncommonly heavy. If he feared robbery he would have been wiser to have slept here and gone on with what is coach to-morrow afternoon. Well, well, I envy you your fire, Aislaby. If I were you, I should never leave it; but old men will die, and babies must be born, and time and tide wait for no man, not even for us doctors. Good night, Aislaby; your wife's doing famously. In ten years' time you won't be sitting here alone by what is hearth, 1 'll wager.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199