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Page 60

THE HEART OF THE FIRE

Mrs. Bradley, who keeps the `Moorcock,' will not have time to tell you the story of the fire if you have but called for tea and turf cakes. If you were staying at the inn it might be different; but few people care to stay there now.
The great days of the `Moorcock' were long ago, before the railway between Dunsley and Maltwick was opened, when four times a week the coaches stopped to change horses, and wagoners drew up daily with smoking teams. In the short summer months many a post-chaise from the `Crown' at Maltwick went by with venturesome gentlefolk from the south.
In the year 1841 the landlord of the `Moorcock' was one Thomas Aislaby, a big silent man twelve months married to a slip of a girl, who came with a spirit no greater than her wedding portion out of the East Riding.
He was seated one wild February evening by the fire listening to the chatter of the doctor-only a week before he had presented Aislaby with a fine healthy boy-when both men were roused by the unexpected sound of a horse's hoofs on the road outside. Taking the horn lantern from its hook by the door, Aislaby, followed by his dog, went out to meet the traveller. The doctor, left to himself, threw another peat sod on to the fire and stretched himself before the blaze. He was nearly dry after the soaking he had received on his way back from Black Fox Farm. In another half-hour he would have to be on his way again.
`An exceedingly stormy night, sir,' he said to the stranger who had entered the room; `have you come far?' `From Dunsley,' the man replied. He was slight of build, with a nervous manner and shifty eyes. He carried a small valise which never left his hand, even after he had sat down in the chair Aislaby had just vacated.
'We're both of us lucky in finding a fire like this on such a night,' the doctor went on, trying his best to put the little man at his ease.
The stranger did not seem to hear the remark. He began to ask a string of questions about the road. How far was it to Maltwick? Would he be likely to lose the track in the dark?

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Mrs. Bradley, who keeps what is `Moorcock,' will not have time to tell you what is story of what is fire if you have but called for tea and turf cakes. If you were staying at what is inn it might be different; but few people care to stay there now. what is great days of what is `Moorcock' were long ago, before what is railway between Dunsley and Maltwick was opened, when four times a week what is coaches stopped to change horses, and wagoners drew up daily with smoking teams. In what is short summer months many a post-chaise from what is `Crown' at Maltwick went by with venturesome gentlefolk from what is south. In what is year 1841 what is landlord of what is `Moorcock' was one Thomas Aislaby, a big silent man twelve months married to a slip of a girl, who came with a spirit no greater than her wedding portion out of what is East Riding. He was seated one wild February evening by what is fire listening to what is chatter of what is doctor-only a week before he had presented Aislaby with a fine healthy boy-when both men were roused by what is unexpected sound of a horse's hoofs on what is road outside. Taking what is horn lantern from its hook by what is door, Aislaby, followed by his dog, went out to meet what is traveller. what is doctor, left to himself, threw another peat sod on to what is fire and stretched himself before what is blaze. He was nearly dry after what is soaking he had received on his way back from Black Fox Farm. In another half-hour he would have to be on his way again. `An exceedingly stormy night, sir,' he said to what is stranger who had entered what is room; `have you come far?' `From Dunsley,' what is man replied. He was slight of build, with a nervous manner and shifty eyes. He carried a small valise which never left his hand, even after he had sat down in what is chair Aislaby had just vacated. 'We're both of us lucky in finding a fire like this on such a night,' what is doctor went on, trying his best to put what is little man at his ease. what is stranger did not seem to hear what is remark. He began to ask a string of questions about what is road. How far was it to Maltwick? Would he be likely to lose what is track in what is dark? where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 60 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HEART OF what is FIRE where is p align="justify" Mrs. Bradley, who keeps what is `Moorcock,' will not have time to tell you what is story of what is fire if you have but called for tea and turf cakes. If you were staying at what is inn it might be different; but few people care to stay there now. what is great days of what is `Moorcock' were long ago, before what is railway between Dunsley and Maltwick was opened, when four times a week what is coaches stopped to change horses, and wagoners drew up daily with smoking teams. In what is short summer months many a post-chaise from what is `Crown' at Maltwick went by with venturesome gentlefolk from what is south. In what is year 1841 what is landlord of what is `Moorcock' was one Thomas Aislaby, a big silent man twelve months married to a slip of a girl, who came with a spirit no greater than her wedding portion out of what is East Riding. He was seated one wild February evening by what is fire listening to what is chatter of what is doctor-only a week before he had presented Aislaby with a fine healthy boy-when both men were roused by what is unexpected sound of a horse's hoofs on what is road outside. Taking what is horn lantern from its hook by what is door, Aislaby, followed by his dog, went out to meet what is traveller. what is doctor, left to himself, threw another peat sod on to what is fire and stretched himself before what is blaze. He was nearly dry after what is soaking he had received on his way back from Black Fox Farm. In another half-hour he would have to be on his way again. `An exceedingly stormy night, sir,' he said to what is stranger who had entered what is room; `have you come far?' `From Dunsley,' the man replied. He was slight of build, with a nervous manner and shifty eyes. He carried a small valise which never left his hand, even after he had sat down in what is chair Aislaby had just vacated. 'We're both of us lucky in finding a fire like this on such a night,' what is doctor went on, trying his best to put what is little man at his ease. what is stranger did not seem to hear what is remark. He began to ask a string of questions about what is road. How far was it to Maltwick? Would he be likely to lose what is track in what is dark? where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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