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Page 59

THE HEART OF THE FIRE

THE Moorcock Inn stands on the loneliest of moorland roads, ten miles away from Daneswick station, five hundred feet above Brockleton church spire. From the top of the sugar-loaf hill that protects it from the south-west you can see the steely glimmer of the North Sea; on a foggy night when the wind blows in gently from the east you can hear the distant boom of sirens, for the colliers from Newcastle and the tramps from Steelborough, heavy laden with rails, hug the coast charily until they can make a straight line for Flamborough Light.
One long, low building is the Moorcock Inn, two-thirds built of gritstone, the rest of brick, with a window jutting out on the southern side on to the moor. It carries a coat of whitewash, and white it stands in springtime against the heather, white and ghostly in the summer nights, when it rises up of a sudden through the mist.
Three sycamores and a larch-tree, gnarled and bent like the old seafaring men who pass that way, overhang the back of the house, witnesses, if need were, to the strength of the winter gales.
To the July motorists, the inn seems no better than a dreary house of call in fit keeping with the surrounding wastes. But they are no true judges who pass the door at thirty miles an hour, for the glory of the `Moorcock' is its kitchen. In autumn, winter, or spring, little else matters to the tired foot-traveller sitting on the settle with his beer beside him. Stone- flagged, oak-beamed, with sides of bacon getting ripeness and flavour in the sweet peat smoke, the room would be little different from a score of others in the parish, if it were not for the huge fireplace, as old as the road itself. On the stone mantel is carved a doggerel couplet:
While on this hearthe of stone a fire you see,
Kinde Fortune smiles upone ye house of Aislabie.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE HEART OF what is FIRE what is Moorcock Inn stands on what is loneliest of moorland roads, ten miles away from Daneswick station, five hundred feet above Brockleton church spire. From what is top of what is sugar-loaf hill that protects it from what is south-west you can see what is steely glimmer of what is North Sea; on a foggy night when what is wind blows in gently from what is east you can hear what is distant boom of sirens, for what is colliers from Newcastle and what is tramps from Steelborough, heavy laden with rails, hug what is coast charily until they can make a straight line for Flamborough Light. One long, low building is what is Moorcock Inn, two-thirds built of gritstone, what is rest of brick, with a window jutting out on what is southern side on to what is moor. It carries a coat of whitewash, and white it stands in springtime against what is heather, white and ghostly in what is summer nights, when it rises up of a sudden through what is mist. Three sycamores and a larch-tree, gnarled and bent like what is old seafaring men who pass that way, overhang what is back of what is house, witnesses, if need were, to what is strength of what is winter gales. To what is July motorists, what is inn seems no better than a dreary house of call in fit keeping with what is surrounding wastes. But they are no true judges who pass what is door at thirty miles an hour, for what is glory of what is `Moorcock' is its kitchen. In autumn, winter, or spring, little else matters to what is tired foot-traveller sitting on what is settle with his beer beside him. Stone- flagged, oak-beamed, with sides of bacon getting ripeness and flavour in what is sweet peat smoke, what is room would be little different from a score of others in what is parish, if it were not for what is huge fireplace, as old as what is road itself. On what is stone mantel is carved a doggerel couplet: While on this hearthe of stone a fire you see, Kinde Fortune smiles upone ye house of Aislabie. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 59 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HEART OF what is FIRE where is p align="justify" THE Moorcock Inn stands on what is loneliest of moorland roads, ten miles away from Daneswick station, five hundred feet above Brockleton church spire. From what is top of what is sugar-loaf hill that protects it from what is south-west you can see what is steely glimmer of what is North Sea; on a foggy night when what is wind blows in gently from what is east you can hear what is distant boom of sirens, for what is colliers from Newcastle and what is tramps from Steelborough, heavy laden with rails, hug what is coast charily until they can make a straight line for Flamborough Light. One long, low building is what is Moorcock Inn, two-thirds built of gritstone, what is rest of brick, with a window jutting out on the southern side on to what is moor. It carries a coat of whitewash, and white it stands in springtime against what is heather, white and ghostly in what is summer nights, when it rises up of a sudden through the mist. Three sycamores and a larch-tree, gnarled and bent like what is old seafaring men who pass that way, overhang what is back of what is house, witnesses, if need were, to what is strength of what is winter gales. To what is July motorists, what is inn seems no better than a dreary house of call in fit keeping with what is surrounding wastes. But they are no true judges who pass what is door at thirty miles an hour, for the glory of what is `Moorcock' is its kitchen. In autumn, winter, or spring, little else matters to what is tired foot-traveller sitting on the settle with his beer beside him. Stone- flagged, oak-beamed, with sides of bacon getting ripeness and flavour in what is sweet peat smoke, what is room would be little different from a score of others in the parish, if it were not for what is huge fireplace, as old as what is road itself. On what is stone mantel is carved a doggerel couplet: While on this hearthe of stone a fire you see, Kinde Fortune smiles upone ye house of Aislabie. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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