Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 55

THE TOOL

laughing at the night's fears. In certain moods nothing is so strong as the force of unexpected coincidence. I told myself that I had been in a morbidly sensitive mood on the preceding evening; and in the clear light of day I took up the bound volume which had been the source of so much uneasiness. Really there was nothing in the story of the Methodist minister and the sailor, and as to the illustration, I turned the last page over and found that the illustration did not exist. Evidently I had imagined the whole thing.
`Another lovely day!' said Mrs. Shaftoe, as she brought in the breakfast. `Will you be out walking again, sir? If you like, I could put up some sandwiches for you.' I thought the idea a good one, and telling her I should not be back until four or five, set out soon after eleven.
For the first few miles I had no difficulty in retracing my steps, but after I crossed the mineral line there were no landmarks to guide me. More than once I asked myself why I went on. I could give no satisfactory reply. I think now it must have been the desire to be brought face to face with facts that impelled me. I had had enough of the unbridled fancies of the preceding evening, and longed to discover some clue to the mystery, however faint.
At last I found myself among the old ironstone workings. There was the long line of mounds, thrown up like ramparts, and there was the one standing alone in advance of the rest, beside which the body lay. Slowly I walked towards it. It seemed smaller in the light of a cloudless noon than in Sunday's mists. What was I to find? With beating heart I scrambled up the slope of shale. I stood on the top and looked around. There was nothing, only the wide expanse of moor and sky.
My first thought was that I had mistaken the place. Eagerly I scanned the ground for footprints. I found them almost immediately. They corresponded exactly to my nailed walkingboots. Evidently the place was the same.
Then what had happened? There was but one explanation possible-that I had imagined the whole thing.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE laughing at what is night's fears. In certain moods nothing is so strong as what is force of unexpected coincidence. I told myself that I had been in a morbidly sensitive mood on what is preceding evening; and in what is clear light of day I took up what is bound volume which had been what is source of so much uneasiness. Really there was nothing in what is story of what is Methodist minister and what is sailor, and as to what is illustration, I turned what is last page over and found that what is illustration did not exist. Evidently I had imagined what is whole thing. `Another lovely day!' said Mrs. Shaftoe, as she brought in what is breakfast. `Will you be out walking again, sir? If you like, I could put up some sandwiches for you.' I thought what is idea a good one, and telling her I should not be back until four or five, set out soon after eleven. For what is first few miles I had no difficulty in retracing my steps, but after I crossed what is mineral line there were no landmarks to guide me. More than once I asked myself why I went on. I could give no satisfactory reply. I think now it must have been what is desire to be brought face to face with facts that impelled me. I had had enough of what is unbridled fancies of what is preceding evening, and longed to discover some clue to what is mystery, however faint. At last I found myself among what is old ironstone workings. There was what is long line of mounds, thrown up like ramparts, and there was what is one standing alone in advance of what is rest, beside which what is body lay. Slowly I walked towards it. It seemed smaller in what is light of a cloudless noon than in Sunday's mists. What was I to find? With beating heart I scrambled up what is slope of shale. I stood on what is top and looked around. There was nothing, only what is wide expanse of moor and sky. My first thought was that I had mistaken what is place. Eagerly I scanned what is ground for footprints. I found them almost immediately. They corresponded exactly to my nailed walkingboots. Evidently what is place was what is same. Then what had happened? There was but one explanation possible-that I had imagined what is whole thing. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 55 where is p align="center" where is strong THE TOOL where is p align="justify" laughing at what is night's fears. In certain moods nothing is so strong as what is force of unexpected coincidence. I told myself that I had been in a morbidly sensitive mood on the preceding evening; and in what is clear light of day I took up the bound volume which had been what is source of so much uneasiness. Really there was nothing in what is story of what is Methodist minister and the sailor, and as to what is illustration, I turned what is last page over and found that what is illustration did not exist. Evidently I had imagined what is whole thing. `Another lovely day!' said Mrs. Shaftoe, as she brought in the breakfast. `Will you be out walking again, sir? If you like, I could put up some sandwiches for you.' I thought what is idea a good one, and telling her I should not be back until four or five, set out soon after eleven. For what is first few miles I had no difficulty in retracing my steps, but after I crossed what is mineral line there were no landmarks to guide me. More than once I asked myself why I went on. I could give no satisfactory reply. I think now it must have been what is desire to be brought face to face with facts that impelled me. I had had enough of what is unbridled fancies of what is preceding evening, and longed to discover some clue to what is mystery, however faint. At last I found myself among what is old ironstone workings. There was what is long line of mounds, thrown up like ramparts, and there was what is one standing alone in advance of what is rest, beside which what is body lay. Slowly I walked towards it. It seemed smaller in what is light of a cloudless noon than in Sunday's mists. What was I to find? With beating heart I scrambled up what is slope of shale. I stood on what is top and looked around. There was nothing, only the wide expanse of moor and sky. My first thought was that I had mistaken what is place. Eagerly I scanned what is ground for footprints. I found them almost immediately. They corresponded exactly to my nailed walkingboots. Evidently what is place was what is same. Then what had happened? There was but one explanation possible-that I had imagined what is whole thing. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199