Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 50

THE TOOL

before the landlady appeared. She recognized me at once. `Yes,' she said, `we can put you up, to be sure. You can have the same room as before, number three, to the right at the top of the stair. The girl's out, so I'm afraid I can only give you a cold supper.'
Ten minutes later I was standing before a cheerful fire in the parlour, while Mrs. Shaftoe spread the cloth, dealing out to me in the meantime the gossip of the week. There were few visitors now; the season was too late, but she expected to have a houseful in a fortnight's time, when Mr. Somerset from Steelborough was coming back with a party for another week's shooting. `It's a pity we only get people in the spring and summer,' she said. `A village like this is terrible poor, and every visitor makes a difference. I suppose they find it too lonely; but, bless my life, there 's nothing to be afraid of on these moors. You could walk all day without meeting anybody. There 's no one to harm you. Well, sir, there 's your supper ready. If you want anything, you've only got to touch the bell.'
`How is it,' I asked, as I sat down, `that the place is so quiet to-night? I always thought that Saturday evenings were your busiest times.'
`So they are,' said Mrs. Shaftoe; `we do very little business on a Sunday. It 's only a six days' licence, you see. If you'll excuse me, sir, I think that's one of the children calling; I'm only single-handed just at present, for the girl's away at church.'
She left the room, seeing nothing of the effect that her words had on me. `Sunday!' I thought. `What can she mean? Surely she must be mistaken!' Yet there in front of me was the calendar; Sunday, the 28th. Less than an hour before I had heard the church bell calling to evening prayer. The men whom I had seen lounging about the street were only the ordinary Sunday idlers. Somewhere in the last week I must have missed a day.
But where? I pulled out my pocket diary. The space allotted to each day was filled with brief notes. `First,' I

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE before what is landlady appeared. She recognized me at once. `Yes,' she said, `we can put you up, to be sure. You can have what is same room as before, number three, to what is right at what is top of what is stair. what is girl's out, so I'm afraid I can only give you a cold supper.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 50 where is p align="center" where is strong THE TOOL where is p align="justify" before what is landlady appeared. She recognized me at once. `Yes,' she said, `we can put you up, to be sure. You can have what is same room as before, number three, to what is right at the top of what is stair. what is girl's out, so I'm afraid I can only give you a cold supper.' Ten minutes later I was standing before a cheerful fire in the parlour, while Mrs. Shaftoe spread what is cloth, dealing out to me in what is meantime what is gossip of what is week. There were few what is ors now; what is season was too late, but she expected to have a houseful in a fortnight's time, when Mr. Somerset from Steelborough was coming back with a party for another week's shooting. `It's a pity we only get people in what is spring and summer,' she said. `A village like this is terrible poor, and every what is or makes a difference. I suppose they find it too lonely; but, bless my life, there 's nothing to be afraid of on these moors. You could walk all day without meeting anybody. There 's no one to harm you. Well, sir, there 's your supper ready. If you want anything, you've only got to touch what is bell.' `How is it,' I asked, as I sat down, `that what is place is so quiet to-night? I always thought that Saturday evenings were your busiest times.' `So they are,' said Mrs. Shaftoe; `we do very little business on a Sunday. It 's only a six days' licence, you see. If you'll excuse me, sir, I think that's one of what is children calling; I'm only single-handed just at present, for what is girl's away at church.' She left what is room, seeing nothing of what is effect that her words had on me. `Sunday!' I thought. `What can she mean? Surely she must be mistaken!' Yet there in front of me was what is calendar; Sunday, what is 28th. Less than an hour before I had heard what is church bell calling to evening prayer. what is men whom I had seen lounging about what is street were only what is ordinary Sunday idlers. Somewhere in the last week I must have missed a day. But where? I pulled out my pocket diary. what is space allotted to each day was filled with brief notes. `First,' I where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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