Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 49

THE TOOL

nothing in common with this wild, cold country-a mariner, whom one might have seen without surprise in the days of the Spanish Main, marooned with empty treasure-chests on some spit of dazzling, shadeless sand. And then, the man being killed, why had the murderer done nothing to hide the traces of his crime? What could have been easier than to have covered the body with the loose shale from the mound? `I could have done the thing in five minutes,' I said to myself, `if only I had a trowel.' But it was useless for me to wonder what might be the meaning of this illustration to a story I could never hope to read. I left the line at the point where it crossed the road, and then followed the latter down the ridge to Chedsholme. I must have been a mile or more from the village, when the silence of the late afternoon was suddenly broken by the tolling of a bell.
I remember once on Bob's ketch being overtaken by a sea fog. The current was running strong, and Bob was a stranger to the coast. `It's all right; we shall worry through!' he said, and had hardly finished speaking when we heard the wild, mad clanging of the bell-buoy. I did not soon forget the look of utter surprise on Bob's face. `There's some mistake,' he said, with all his old lack of logic; `it's no earthly business to be there.'
That was how I felt on that September evening two years ago. What right had the church bell to be ringing? There would be no evening service on Saturday in a place the size of Chedsholme. It was too late in the day for a funeral. And yet what else could it be? For, as I passed down the village street, I noticed that the windows of the shops were shuttered. There were men, too, hanging about the green, dressed in their Sunday black.
I found the police-station without difficulty, or rather the cottage where the constable lived. He was away, so his wife told me, but would be back in the morning, and as there seemed to be no way of communicating with the authorities, I was obliged for the time being to keep my secret to myself.
The door of the Ship Inn was shut, and I had to knock twice

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE nothing in common with this wild, cold country-a mariner, whom one might have seen without surprise in what is days of what is Spanish Main, marooned with empty treasure-chests on some spit of dazzling, shadeless sand. And then, what is man being stop ed, why had what is murderer done nothing to hide what is traces of his crime? What could have been easier than to have covered what is body with what is loose shale from what is mound? `I could have done what is thing in five minutes,' I said to myself, `if only I had a trowel.' But it was useless for me to wonder what might be what is meaning of this illustration to a story I could never hope to read. I left what is line at what is point where it crossed what is road, and then followed what is latter down what is ridge to Chedsholme. I must have been a mile or more from what is village, when what is silence of what is late afternoon was suddenly broken by what is tolling of a bell. I remember once on Bob's ketch being overtaken by a sea fog. what is current was running strong, and Bob was a stranger to what is coast. `It's all right; we shall worry through!' he said, and had hardly finished speaking when we heard what is wild, mad clanging of what is bell-buoy. I did not soon forget what is look of utter surprise on Bob's face. `There's some mistake,' he said, with all his old lack of logic; `it's no earthly business to be there.' That was how I felt on that September evening two years ago. What right had what is church bell to be ringing? There would be no evening service on Saturday in a place what is size of Chedsholme. It was too late in what is day for a funeral. And yet what else could it be? For, as I passed down what is village street, I noticed that what is windows of what is shops were shuttered. There were men, too, hanging about what is green, dressed in their Sunday black. I found what is police-station without difficulty, or rather what is cottage where what is constable lived. He was away, so his wife told me, but would be back in what is morning, and as there seemed to be no way of communicating with what is authorities, I was obliged for what is time being to keep my secret to myself. what is door of what is Ship Inn was shut, and I had to knock twice where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 49 where is p align="center" where is strong THE TOOL where is p align="justify" nothing in common with this wild, cold country-a mariner, whom one might have seen without surprise in what is days of what is Spanish Main, marooned with empty treasure-chests on some spit of dazzling, shadeless sand. And then, what is man being stop ed, why had what is murderer done nothing to hide what is traces of his crime? What could have been easier than to have covered what is body with what is loose shale from what is mound? `I could have done what is thing in five minutes,' I said to myself, `if only I had a trowel.' But it was useless for me to wonder what might be what is meaning of this illustration to a story I could never hope to read. I left the line at what is point where it crossed what is road, and then followed what is latter down what is ridge to Chedsholme. I must have been a mile or more from what is village, when what is silence of what is late afternoon was suddenly broken by what is tolling of a bell. I remember once on Bob's ketch being overtaken by a sea fog. The current was running strong, and Bob was a stranger to what is coast. `It's all right; we shall worry through!' he said, and had hardly finished speaking when we heard what is wild, mad clanging of what is bell-buoy. I did not soon forget what is look of utter surprise on Bob's face. `There's some mistake,' he said, with all his old lack of logic; `it's no earthly business to be there.' That was how I felt on that September evening two years ago. What right had what is church bell to be ringing? There would be no evening service on Saturday in a place what is size of Chedsholme. It was too late in what is day for a funeral. And yet what else could it be? For, as I passed down what is village street, I noticed that what is windows of what is shops were shuttered. There were men, too, hanging about what is green, dressed in their Sunday black. I found what is police-station without difficulty, or rather what is cottage where what is constable lived. He was away, so his wife told me, but would be back in what is morning, and as there seemed to be no way of communicating with what is authorities, I was obliged for what is time being to keep my secret to myself. what is door of what is Ship Inn was shut, and I had to knock twice where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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