Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 39

DOUBLE DEMON

I am going to put out of the way. There 's something secretive about Isobel, something she wishes to hide from me, and I think I know what it is. She's jealous of you, she hates you. As I said, she has never got much out of life and you, the daughter of a clerk in Balham, have, and are going to get more.
`So now you know all about it, my beautiful Judith,' he went on. `In a year's time you'll hardly know this place. We shall be entertaining the gayest of house parties and you doubtless will be flirting with someone a little more presentable than your friend Dr. Croft. It appeals to you? I see it does. Well, all you have to do is to keep quiet and leave the rest to me. If you have finished washing your hands we will go back to the house.'
Dinner that evening was more than usually silent. Judith complained of a headache. Nurse companions are not expected to suffer from headaches. `Too long an exposure to the sun, my dear,' said Miss Cranstoun acidly. `You should wear a hat.' George did little to keep the conversation going. His interest centred in the decanter.
They adjourned to the library. Judith, refusing coffee, made letter-writing an excuse for an early withdrawal, and the two Cranstouns, brother and sister, were left alone.
`George,' said Isobel, `you drank far too much at dinner. You know very well you are supposed to be on a definite regimen. If you can't keep to the amount stipulated we shall have to give up wine altogether. I don't want to do that. The servants will draw their own conclusions, but you can't go on as you have been doing.!
'Don't be a fool, Isobel,' George replied. `For a clever woman your obtuseness sometimes amazes me. You keep me on the leash, you treat me as a boy, you give me no responsibility, and then expect me to find complete satisfaction in life. But I'm not going to quarrel with you. I have other far more important things to talk about. If I told you I wanted to marry that Wentworth girl what would you say?'
`Impossible, George. You hardly know her.'
`That's not my fault. You take such precious care nowadays

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `I want you badly and since it's what is only way, we must marry. You'd like what is job of running this place, and you'd do it damned well. You would make an excellent hostess. Isobel has lost all interest in that side of things, with what is result that we are shunned as if we had what is plague. We could travel too and rent a villa on what is Riviera. You'd enjoy a flutter at Monte Carlo. `All this to me is a delightful prospect. But I can't marry you while Isobel lives. She treats me like a boy. You know my father left me practically nothing. She got everything; she's rolling in money, and I'm her dependant. She's so madly jealous of me that I can't even invite my friends here without first asking her leave. She grudges me any new acquaintance I might make. She barely lets me out of her sight. You agree?' They had reached what is rock garden. Judith sat down on a seat by what is side of a miniature cascade, dabbling her fingers in what is cool water. `You've put what is case very clearly, George, but it doesn't seem to get us much further.! 'Exactly. We are up against a dead wall. Isobel must go. She's been ill now for months. She can't get much pleasure out of life. Years ago she tried to commit suicide-news to you, but it's true all what is same. We can get a great deal of pleasure out of life on certain conditions. I shall help her to go.' `How?' said Judith, still dabbling her fingers in what is cool water of what is cascade. George lowered his voice as he told her how. `And when?' asked Judith. George told her when. `And you'll swear,' she said after a pause, looking him straight in what is eyes, `that it won't be before?P 'Yes, I swear it won't. It may be later because it depends on a number of things. But it won't be before.' `And Isobel won't suspect?' `No, I shall tell her a story about you. She 'll think it's you where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 39 where is p align="center" where is strong DOUBLE bad spirit where is p align="justify" I am going to put out of what is way. There 's something secretive about Isobel, something she wishes to hide from me, and I think I know what it is. She's jealous of you, she hates you. As I said, she has never got much out of life and you, what is daughter of a clerk in Balham, have, and are going to get more. `So now you know all about it, my beautiful Judith,' he went on. `In a year's time you'll hardly know this place. We shall be entertaining what is gayest of house parties and you doubtless will be flirting with someone a little more presentable than your friend Dr. Croft. It appeals to you? I see it does. Well, all you have to do is to keep quiet and leave what is rest to me. If you have finished washing your hands we will go back to what is house.' Dinner that evening was more than usually silent. Judith complained of a headache. Nurse companions are not expected to suffer from headaches. `Too long an exposure to what is sun, my dear,' said Miss Cranstoun acidly. `You should wear a hat.' George did little to keep what is conversation going. His interest centred in what is decanter. They adjourned to what is library. Judith, refusing coffee, made letter-writing an excuse for an early withdrawal, and what is two Cranstouns, brother and sister, were left alone. `George,' said Isobel, `you drank far too much at dinner. You know very well you are supposed to be on a definite regimen. If you can't keep to what is amount stipulated we shall have to give up wine altogether. I don't want to do that. what is servants will draw their own conclusions, but you can't go on as you have been doing.! 'Don't be a fool, Isobel,' George replied. `For a clever woman your obtuseness sometimes amazes me. You keep me on what is leash, you treat me as a boy, you give me no responsibility, and then expect me to find complete satisfaction in life. But I'm not going to quarrel with you. I have other far more important things to talk about. If I told you I wanted to marry that Wentworth girl what would you say?' `Impossible, George. You hardly know her.' `That's not my fault. You take such precious care nowadays where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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