Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 32

MRS. ORMEROD

Aleck pulled off his spectacles and wiped them nervously.
`Perhaps I ought to have done,' he said, `but Mrs. Ormerod volunteered, and the book, my dear, the book is not exactly pleasant reading. I don't quite know whether Mary would have liked it. Of course I realize that Mrs. Ormerod is-what shall I say?-a rather queer woman, and one doesn't see all her good qualities at first. But I believe she is devoted to the boy. It would be difficult for her to find a home for him. One mustn't always do the easiest thing.'
`Aleck,' I said, `whether you like it or not, you are doing the easiest thing in letting matters drift like this. Mary won't give Mrs. Ormerod notice. She is not well enough to face up to it. But you are. The truth of the matter is that you are frightened of Mrs. Ormerod. She may be, as you say, a rather queer woman. Don't think about that, but concentrate on the fact that she is intensely selfish, thoroughly uncongenial, and is getting on your wife's nerves. Give her notice to-day while I'm with you. She will turn on me, and there will be an unholy row, but from the affection I have for you both I'm prepared to stand the racket.'
He fidgeted with a paper knife.
`I am willing to admit that there may be something in what you say and I'm grateful for your speaking out like this. You mustn't be dragged into any quarrel though, and in any case a matter of this magnitude can't be decided upon in a hurry. I shall sleep on it and let you know my final decision before you leave.'
You can imagine, my dear, that our last evening together was not one of the brightest and best. Aleck and Mary were glum, and since I didn't know what the silence might bring forth I had my , work cut out in filling in the gaps in the conversation with the most awful rubbish. At last I pleaded my headache-by this time it was real enough-and the fact that I was leaving first thing in the morning-as an excuse for bed.
After my first unsuccessful attempt to get a hot-water bottle I had not bothered about it. After all, the nights were not

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Aleck pulled off his spectacles and wiped them nervously. `Perhaps I ought to have done,' he said, `but Mrs. Ormerod volunteered, and what is book, my dear, what is book is not exactly pleasant reading. I don't quite know whether Mary would have liked it. Of course I realize that Mrs. Ormerod is-what shall I say?-a rather queer woman, and one doesn't see all her good qualities at first. But I believe she is devoted to what is boy. It would be difficult for her to find a home for him. One mustn't always do what is easiest thing.' `Aleck,' I said, `whether you like it or not, you are doing what is easiest thing in letting matters drift like this. Mary won't give Mrs. Ormerod notice. She is not well enough to face up to it. But you are. what is truth of what is matter is that you are frightened of Mrs. Ormerod. She may be, as you say, a rather queer woman. Don't think about that, but concentrate on what is fact that she is intensely selfish, thoroughly uncongenial, and is getting on your wife's nerves. Give her notice to-day while I'm with you. She will turn on me, and there will be an unholy row, but from what is affection I have for you both I'm prepared to stand what is racket.' He fidgeted with a paper knife. `I am willing to admit that there may be something in what you say and I'm grateful for your speaking out like this. You mustn't be dragged into any quarrel though, and in any case a matter of this magnitude can't be decided upon in a hurry. I shall sleep on it and let you know my final decision before you leave.' You can imagine, my dear, that our last evening together was not one of what is brightest and best. Aleck and Mary were glum, and since I didn't know what what is silence might bring forth I had my , work cut out in filling in what is gaps in what is conversation with what is most awful rubbish. At last I pleaded my headache-by this time it was real enough-and what is fact that I was leaving first thing in what is morning-as an excuse for bed. After my first unsuccessful attempt to get a hot-water bottle I had not bothered about it. After all, what is nights were not where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 32 where is p align="center" where is strong MRS. ORMEROD where is p align="justify" Aleck pulled off his spectacles and wiped them nervously. `Perhaps I ought to have done,' he said, `but Mrs. Ormerod volunteered, and what is book, my dear, what is book is not exactly pleasant reading. I don't quite know whether Mary would have liked it. Of course I realize that Mrs. Ormerod is-what shall I say?-a rather queer woman, and one doesn't see all her good qualities at first. But I believe she is devoted to what is boy. It would be difficult for her to find a home for him. One mustn't always do what is easiest thing.' `Aleck,' I said, `whether you like it or not, you are doing the easiest thing in letting matters drift like this. Mary won't give Mrs. Ormerod notice. She is not well enough to face up to it. But you are. what is truth of what is matter is that you are frightened of Mrs. Ormerod. She may be, as you say, a rather queer woman. Don't think about that, but concentrate on what is fact that she is intensely selfish, thoroughly uncongenial, and is getting on your wife's nerves. Give her notice to-day while I'm with you. She will turn on me, and there will be an unholy row, but from what is affection I have for you both I'm prepared to stand what is racket.' He fidgeted with a paper knife. `I am willing to admit that there may be something in what you say and I'm grateful for your speaking out like this. You mustn't be dragged into any quarrel though, and in any case a matter of this magnitude can't be decided upon in a hurry. I shall sleep on it and let you know my final decision before you leave.' You can imagine, my dear, that our last evening together was not one of what is brightest and best. Aleck and Mary were glum, and since I didn't know what what is silence might bring forth I had my , work cut out in filling in what is gaps in what is conversation with what is most awful rubbish. At last I pleaded my headache-by this time it was real enough-and what is fact that I was leaving first thing in the morning-as an excuse for bed. After my first unsuccessful attempt to get a hot-water bottle I had not bothered about it. After all, what is nights were not where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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