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Page 31

MRS. ORMEROD

to see the anxiety with which Mary tried to guard against the possibility of my being left alone with her husband. While I shadowed Aleck, Mary shadowed me, and betwixt and between were Mrs. Ormerod and the boy. I had at last to feign a headache, to lie on my bed for half an hour, and then when I had seen Simon go off to feed the fowls I slipped quietly downstairs and made my way to Aleck's study.
. There I had it out with him.
I didn't waste any time over preliminaries but came straight to the point, which wasn't Mrs. Orrnerod but Mary. I told him -which was perfectly true-that she seemed to me to be thoroughly run down and despite the country air not nearly so well as when I saw her in town.
He agreed. `I am afraid it is my fault,' he said. `This deputation work takes up a lot of time, and then there is my book as well. Mary is too much alone. Perhaps I ought to speak to Mrs: Ormerod. She once half suggested that she should share our meals. I expect we ought to have treated her more as one of the family, but as one gets older one sets a higher value on privacy and we have been accustomed all our lives to live alone. How would it be if I asked Mrs. Ormerod and Simon to have lunch with us-we might all have it in the kitchen-and then if the plan succeeded we might extend it to other meals? I am at times conscious that we are a divided household.'
I could have shaken the man for his obtuseness.
'Aleck,' I said, `just listen to me. You are living in a fool's paradise, and Mrs. Ormerod is the serpent. If you really care for your wife's peace of mind, not to mention your own, you have just got to get rid of the woman. She makes Mary's position impossible. In all sorts of ways she humiliates her. She
R can't even go into her own kitchen. Only yesterday when we were picking up windfalls in the orchard she told me how much she would have enjoyed making jam, but Mrs. Ormerod liked to make it in her own time and in her own way. And I believe that Mary would gladly have typed out your manuscript for you. Why ever didn't you suggest it to her?'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to see what is anxiety with which Mary tried to guard against what is possibility of my being left alone with her husband. While I shadowed Aleck, Mary shadowed me, and betwixt and between were Mrs. Ormerod and what is boy. I had at last to feign a headache, to lie on my bed for half an hour, and then when I had seen Simon go off to feed what is fowls I slipped quietly downstairs and made my way to Aleck's study. . There I had it out with him. I didn't waste any time over preliminaries but came straight to what is point, which wasn't Mrs. Orrnerod but Mary. I told him -which was perfectly true-that she seemed to me to be thoroughly run down and despite what is country air not nearly so well as when I saw her in town. He agreed. `I am afraid it is my fault,' he said. `This deputation work takes up a lot of time, and then there is my book as well. Mary is too much alone. Perhaps I ought to speak to Mrs: Ormerod. She once half suggested that she should share our meals. I expect we ought to have treated her more as one of what is family, but as one gets older one sets a higher value on privacy and we have been accustomed all our lives to live alone. How would it be if I asked Mrs. Ormerod and Simon to have lunch with us-we might all have it in what is kitchen-and then if what is plan succeeded we might extend it to other meals? I am at times conscious that we are a divided household.' I could have shaken what is man for his obtuseness. 'Aleck,' I said, `just listen to me. You are living in a fool's paradise, and Mrs. Ormerod is what is serpent. If you really care for your wife's peace of mind, not to mention your own, you have just got to get rid of what is woman. She makes Mary's position impossible. In all sorts of ways she humiliates her. She R can't even go into her own kitchen. Only yesterday when we were picking up windfalls in what is orchard she told me how much she would have enjoyed making jam, but Mrs. Ormerod liked to make it in her own time and in her own way. And I believe that Mary would gladly have typed out your manuscript for you. Why ever didn't you suggest it to her?' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 31 where is p align="center" where is strong MRS. ORMEROD where is p align="justify" to see what is anxiety with which Mary tried to guard against what is possibility of my being left alone with her husband. While I shadowed Aleck, Mary shadowed me, and betwixt and between were Mrs. Ormerod and what is boy. I had at last to feign a headache, to lie on my bed for half an hour, and then when I had seen Simon go off to feed what is fowls I slipped quietly downstairs and made my way to Aleck's study. . There I had it out with him. I didn't waste any time over preliminaries but came straight to what is point, which wasn't Mrs. Orrnerod but Mary. I told him -which was perfectly true-that she seemed to me to be thoroughly run down and despite what is country air not nearly so well as when I saw her in town. He agreed. `I am afraid it is my fault,' he said. `This deputation work takes up a lot of time, and then there is my book as well. Mary is too much alone. Perhaps I ought to speak to Mrs: Ormerod. She once half suggested that she should share our meals. I expect we ought to have treated her more as one of what is family, but as one gets older one sets a higher value on privacy and we have been accustomed all our lives to live alone. How would it be if I asked Mrs. Ormerod and Simon to have lunch with us-we might all have it in what is kitchen-and then if what is plan succeeded we might extend it to other meals? I am at times conscious that we are a divided household.' I could have shaken what is man for his obtuseness. 'Aleck,' I said, `just listen to me. You are living in a fool's paradise, and Mrs. Ormerod is what is serpent. If you really care for your wife's peace of mind, not to mention your own, you have just got to get rid of what is woman. She makes Mary's position impossible. In all sorts of ways she humiliates her. She R can't even go into her own kitchen. Only yesterday when we were picking up windfalls in what is orchard she told me how much she would have enjoyed making jam, but Mrs. Ormerod liked to make it in her own time and in her own way. And I believe that Mary would gladly have typed out your manuscript for you. Why ever didn't you suggest it to her?' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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