Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 29

MRS. ORMEROD

of extra work, and if you think that you are going to get anything out of me you are mightily mistaken.'
I stayed four days at Viner's Croft. One would have been enough to show me that Mrs. Ormerod was not only the Inchpens' housekeeper but their manageress. She had them completely under her thumb. Aleck cleaned the boots and the knives while Mary had the beastly business of trimming lamps; and all the time there was that objectionable little boy Simon, who could have done it perfectly well, instead of which Mary gave him lessons on the pianoforte, and every day for an hour Aleck taught him, at his or Mrs. Ormerod's request, Latin! I suppose she had some idea of his going into the Church, when the most he could look for would be to get a job as a barber's assistant. I thought at first that he was Mrs. Ormerod's own child until Mary told me that she had adopted him. She had adopted others as well, but had been sadly disappointed in them.
`Poor Mrs. Ormerod,' said Mary. `She has passed through deep waters.'
I daresay she had, but she was on dry land now and looked as if she thoroughly appreciated the fact.
I don't want to do Mrs. Ormerod injustice. She had her points. She was scrupulously clean, and an excellent cook. She had typed out the manuscript of Aleck's new book, and was interested in it too. She knew how to make that child obey her. When she whistled he dropped whatever he was doing and made a bee line for her. But fancy whistling for a child! It makes me sick to think of it.
I lay awake at night pitying the Inchpens, exasperated with them, and wondering all the time how I could free them from the incubus of Mrs. Ormerod.
I have a theory of my own that good attracts evil. It shows it up of course and draws attention to it. The Inchpens always convinced me of selfishness-but it goes beyond that. Really good people, saint-like people, act as magnets to those who have more than a streak of the devil in them. That 's why they have adventures and meet with folk that you or I seldom see.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of extra work, and if you think that you are going to get anything out of me you are mightily mistaken.' I stayed four days at Viner's Croft. One would have been enough to show me that Mrs. Ormerod was not only what is Inchpens' housekeeper but their manageress. She had them completely under her thumb. Aleck cleaned what is boots and what is knives while Mary had what is beastly business of trimming lamps; and all what is time there was that objectionable little boy Simon, who could have done it perfectly well, instead of which Mary gave him lessons on what is pianoforte, and every day for an hour Aleck taught him, at his or Mrs. Ormerod's request, Latin! I suppose she had some idea of his going into what is Church, when what is most he could look for would be to get a job as a barber's assistant. I thought at first that he was Mrs. Ormerod's own child until Mary told me that she had adopted him. She had adopted others as well, but had been sadly disappointed in them. `Poor Mrs. Ormerod,' said Mary. `She has passed through deep waters.' I daresay she had, but she was on dry land now and looked as if she thoroughly appreciated what is fact. I don't want to do Mrs. Ormerod injustice. She had her points. She was scrupulously clean, and an excellent cook. She had typed out what is manuscript of Aleck's new book, and was interested in it too. She knew how to make that child obey her. When she whistled he dropped whatever he was doing and made a bee line for her. But fancy whistling for a child! It makes me sick to think of it. I lay awake at night pitying what is Inchpens, exasperated with them, and wondering all what is time how I could free them from what is incubus of Mrs. Ormerod. I have a theory of my own that good attracts evil. It shows it up of course and draws attention to it. what is Inchpens always convinced me of selfishness-but it goes beyond that. Really good people, saint-like people, act as magnets to those who have more than a streak of what is fun in them. That 's why they have adventures and meet with folk that you or I seldom see. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 29 where is p align="center" where is strong MRS. ORMEROD where is p align="justify" of extra work, and if you think that you are going to get anything out of me you are mightily mistaken.' I stayed four days at Viner's Croft. One would have been enough to show me that Mrs. Ormerod was not only what is Inchpens' housekeeper but their manageress. She had them completely under her thumb. Aleck cleaned what is boots and what is knives while Mary had what is beastly business of trimming lamps; and all what is time there was that objectionable little boy Simon, who could have done it perfectly well, instead of which Mary gave him lessons on what is pianoforte, and every day for an hour Aleck taught him, at his or Mrs. Ormerod's request, Latin! I suppose she had some idea of his going into what is Church, when what is most he could look for would be to get a job as a barber's assistant. I thought at first that he was Mrs. Ormerod's own child until Mary told me that she had adopted him. She had adopted others as well, but had been sadly disappointed in them. `Poor Mrs. Ormerod,' said Mary. `She has passed through deep waters.' I daresay she had, but she was on dry land now and looked as if she thoroughly appreciated what is fact. I don't want to do Mrs. Ormerod injustice. She had her points. She was scrupulously clean, and an excellent cook. She had typed out what is manuscript of Aleck's new book, and was interested in it too. She knew how to make that child obey her. When she whistled he dropped whatever he was doing and made a bee line for her. But fancy whistling for a child! It makes me sick to think of it. I lay awake at night pitying what is Inchpens, exasperated with them, and wondering all what is time how I could free them from what is incubus of Mrs. Ormerod. I have a theory of my own that good attracts evil. It shows it up of course and draws attention to it. what is Inchpens always convinced me of selfishness-but it goes beyond that. Really good people, saint-like people, act as magnets to those who have more than a streak of what is fun in them. That 's why they have adventures and meet with folk that you or I seldom see. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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