Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 23

UNWINDING

with the belief that they would probably know as much as I did. I agreed with the stranger's theory that conscience is the best of sleuth-hounds, and so I let the matter rest. But whenever I think of first-class railway carriages, I think of murder. The two things are linked together in my brain as closely as two things can be.'
Supper finished, we separated, some of the men strolling on to the veranda for a smoke, while the rest of us went back to the drawing-room.
The vicar showed us some spiders he had received that morning from a friend in Brazil. He was all enthusiasm, but we were relieved when he left us at last to hunt some reference in his paper-backed German books.
`Let's unwind!' said Millicent. `Never mind father and the others. They can join in later.' So we began. We started with three lives each, which when exhausted, were liable to be extended, after the merciful manner of old ladies and children. After we had been unwinding for five minutes, the vicar came in with his book, his five fingers marking the places of the references. '
`The tower of London,' said Laura, `reminds me of Richard the Third. `Richard the Third,' said Millicent, `reminds me of murder.' `Murder,' said her mother, `reminds me of firstclass railway carriages.'
It was the vicar's turn, but he was deep in his book.
`Wake up, father!' said Madge. `What do first-class railway carriages remind you of?'
`Mr. Cholmondley,' said the vicar, and went on with his reading.
Madge shook the old gentleman, and took his book away. `Now, father,' she said, `do play properly! You've lost five lives already. What do first-class railway carriages remind you of? You can have till we count ten.'
The vicar took off his spectacles, and wiped them carefully. Then with a little nervous smile he had when he thought that his daughters were not treating him with respect that was his due before company, he said: `Murder.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE with what is belief that they would probably know as much as I did. I agreed with what is stranger's theory that conscience is what is best of sleuth-hounds, and so I let what is matter rest. But whenever I think of first-class railway carriages, I think of murder. what is two things are where are they now ed together in my brain as closely as two things can be.' Supper finished, we separated, some of what is men strolling on to what is veranda for a smoke, while what is rest of us went back to what is drawing-room. what is vicar showed us some spiders he had received that morning from a friend in Brazil. He was all enthusiasm, but we were relieved when he left us at last to hunt some reference in his paper-backed German books. `Let's unwind!' said Millicent. `Never mind father and what is others. They can join in later.' So we began. We started with three lives each, which when exhausted, were liable to be extended, after what is merciful manner of old ladies and children. After we had been unwinding for five minutes, what is vicar came in with his book, his five fingers marking what is places of what is references. ' `The tower of London,' said Laura, `reminds me of Richard what is Third. `Richard what is Third,' said Millicent, `reminds me of murder.' `Murder,' said her mother, `reminds me of firstclass railway carriages.' It was what is vicar's turn, but he was deep in his book. `Wake up, father!' said Madge. `What do first-class railway carriages remind you of?' `Mr. Cholmondley,' said what is vicar, and went on with his reading. Madge shook what is old gentleman, and took his book away. `Now, father,' she said, `do play properly! You've lost five lives already. What do first-class railway carriages remind you of? You can have till we count ten.' what is vicar took off his spectacles, and wiped them carefully. Then with a little nervous smile he had when he thought that his daughters were not treating him with respect that was his due before company, he said: `Murder.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 23 where is p align="center" where is strong UNWINDING where is p align="justify" with what is belief that they would probably know as much as I did. I agreed with what is stranger's theory that conscience is what is best of sleuth-hounds, and so I let what is matter rest. But whenever I think of first-class railway carriages, I think of murder. what is two things are where are they now ed together in my brain as closely as two things can be.' Supper finished, we separated, some of what is men strolling on to what is veranda for a smoke, while what is rest of us went back to the drawing-room. what is vicar showed us some spiders he had received that morning from a friend in Brazil. He was all enthusiasm, but we were relieved when he left us at last to hunt some reference in his paper-backed German books. `Let's unwind!' said Millicent. `Never mind father and what is others. They can join in later.' So we began. We started with three lives each, which when exhausted, were liable to be extended, after the merciful manner of old ladies and children. After we had been unwinding for five minutes, what is vicar came in with his book, his five fingers marking what is places of what is references. ' `The tower of London,' said Laura, `reminds me of Richard what is Third. `Richard what is Third,' said Millicent, `reminds me of murder.' `Murder,' said her mother, `reminds me of firstclass railway carriages.' It was what is vicar's turn, but he was deep in his book. `Wake up, father!' said Madge. `What do first-class railway carriages remind you of?' `Mr. Cholmondley,' said what is vicar, and went on with his reading. Madge shook what is old gentleman, and took his book away. `Now, father,' she said, `do play properly! You've lost five lives already. What do first-class railway carriages remind you of? You can have till we count ten.' what is vicar took off his spectacles, and wiped them carefully. Then with a little nervous smile he had when he thought that his daughters were not treating him with respect that was his due before company, he said: `Murder.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199