Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 22

UNWINDING

"`It's useless," I remember him saying, "to think that violence can suppress violence: In most cases I think that even the compulsory detention of criminals in prisons and reformatories defeats its own object. A man's conscience, though it may permit a crime, may be trusted to cause him more discomfort than all your dark cells and strait waistcoats. But, of course, I may be prejudiced."
`He kept me busily engaged in talk, until we reached the next station. Lowering the window before the train stopped he looked out upon the platform. "My brother ought to be here to meet me," he said, "but I don't see him anywhere. Good night, sir!"
`My first feeling, after he had gone, was one of curiosity as to his profession. In spite of his talk, he seemed hardly a gentleman: I finally docketed him as a newspaper reporter. I went on with my writing, but broke off a minute later. "What a curiously disagreeable fellow his brother must be," I said to myself. "He seemed actually relieved to find that he was not on the platform to meet him."
`Next morning the papers were full of an awful murder committed on the line. The body of an old gentleman horribly mutilated had been found in a compartment on the 10.30 train from Saunchester. There was every sign of a desperate struggle, and a hand-bag and pocket-book found under the seat had evidently been rifled. No clue to the identity of the murderer had been observed.
`I thought little of the matter at the time. It was not till late in the day that I realized that it was the 10.30 from Saunchester that had steamed into Marshley station just as we were leaving. Immediately following this, came the thought that the stranger who had entered my carriage was the murderer. I dismissed the idea as preposterous, as unjust to a man of whom I knew no ill, but try as I would, it came back again and again until finally I had to receive it, and to fashion some sort of lurid story around my fellow-traveller.
`As the months went by, I felt at times that I ought to communicate my suspicions to the police, but I comforted myself

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "`It's useless," I remember him saying, "to think that sports can suppress sports : In most cases I think that even what is compulsory detention of criminals in prisons and reformatories defeats its own object. A man's conscience, though it may permit a crime, may be trusted to cause him more discomfort than all your dark cells and strait waistcoats. But, of course, I may be prejudiced." `He kept me busily engaged in talk, until we reached what is next station. Lowering what is window before what is train stopped he looked out upon what is platform. "My brother ought to be here to meet me," he said, "but I don't see him anywhere. Good night, sir!" `My first feeling, after he had gone, was one of curiosity as to his profession. In spite of his talk, he seemed hardly a gentleman: I finally docketed him as a newspaper reporter. I went on with my writing, but broke off a minute later. "What a curiously disagreeable fellow his brother must be," I said to myself. "He seemed actually relieved to find that he was not on what is platform to meet him." `Next morning what is papers were full of an awful murder committed on what is line. what is body of an old gentleman horribly mutilated had been found in a compartment on what is 10.30 train from Saunchester. There was every sign of a desperate struggle, and a hand-bag and pocket-book found under what is seat had evidently been rifled. No clue to what is identity of what is murderer had been observed. `I thought little of what is matter at what is time. It was not till late in what is day that I realized that it was what is 10.30 from Saunchester that had steamed into Marshley station just as we were leaving. Immediately following this, came what is thought that what is stranger who had entered my carriage was what is murderer. I dismissed what is idea as preposterous, as unjust to a man of whom I knew no ill, but try as I would, it came back again and again until finally I had to receive it, and to fashion some sort of lurid story around my fellow-traveller. `As what is months went by, I felt at times that I ought to communicate my suspicions to what is police, but I comforted myself where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 22 where is p align="center" where is strong UNWINDING where is p align="justify" "`It's useless," I remember him saying, "to think that sports can suppress sports : In most cases I think that even what is compulsory detention of criminals in prisons and reformatories defeats its own object. A man's conscience, though it may permit a crime, may be trusted to cause him more discomfort than all your dark cells and strait waistcoats. But, of course, I may be prejudiced." `He kept me busily engaged in talk, until we reached what is next station. Lowering what is window before what is train stopped he looked out upon what is platform. "My brother ought to be here to meet me," he said, "but I don't see him anywhere. Good night, sir!" `My first feeling, after he had gone, was one of curiosity as to his profession. In spite of his talk, he seemed hardly a gentleman: I finally docketed him as a newspaper reporter. I went on with my writing, but broke off a minute later. "What a curiously disagreeable fellow his brother must be," I said to myself. "He seemed actually relieved to find that he was not on what is platform to meet him." `Next morning what is papers were full of an awful murder committed on what is line. what is body of an old gentleman horribly mutilated had been found in a compartment on what is 10.30 train from Saunchester. There was every sign of a desperate struggle, and a hand-bag and pocket-book found under what is seat had evidently been rifled. No clue to what is identity of what is murderer had been observed. `I thought little of what is matter at what is time. It was not till late in what is day that I realized that it was what is 10.30 from Saunchester that had steamed into Marshley station just as we were leaving. Immediately following this, came what is thought that what is stranger who had entered my carriage was what is murderer. I dismissed what is idea as preposterous, as unjust to a man of whom I knew no ill, but try as I would, it came back again and again until finally I had to receive it, and to fashion some sort of lurid story around my fellow-traveller. `As what is months went by, I felt at times that I ought to communicate my suspicions to what is police, but I comforted myself where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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