Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 7

MIDNIGHT HOUSE

house; and that every one seemed to be blind to its true nature, seemed to be helping it to gain its end. That was the lurid background of my dreams. One thing alone I remember clearly, a long-drawn-out cry, real and no wild fantasy, that came out of the night to die away into nothingness.
When I got up in the morning soon after nine, I had a splitting headache that made me resolve to be less ready in future to sample strange beds and stranger inns.
I entered the dining-room to find myself no longer alone. A tall, middle-aged man, with a look about him as if he had passed anything but a restful night, was seated at the table. He had just finished breakfast, and rose to go as I took my place. He wished me a curt good morning and left the room. I hurried over my meal, paid my bill to the same impassivefaced woman, the only occupant of the house I had seen, and shouldering my rucksack, set out along the road. I walked on for two miles, until I had nearly reached the summit of a steep incline, and was hesitating over which of three roads to take, when, turning round, I saw the stranger approaching.
As soon as his horse had overtaken me I asked him the way.
`By the by,' I said, `can you tell me anything about that inn? It's the gloomiest house I ever slept in. Is it haunted?'
`Not that I know of. How can a house be haunted when there are no such things as ghosts?'
Something in the ill-concealed superiority of the tone in which he replied made me look at him more closely. He seemed to read my thoughts. `Yes, I'm the doctor,' he said, `and precious little I get out of the business, I can tell you. You are not looking out for a quiet country practice yourself, I suppose? I don't think a night's work like this last's would tempt you.'
`I don't know what it was,' I said, `but, if I was to hazard a guess, I should say some singularly wicked man must have died in the inn last night.'
I-Ie laughed out loud. 'You're rather wide of the mark, for the fact is I have been helping to usher into the world another pretty innocent. As things turned out, the child did not live above half an hour, not altogether to the mother's sorrow, I

Page 8

MIDNIGHT HOUSE

should judge. People talk pretty freely in the country. There's nothing else to do; and we all know each other's affairs. It might have come into the world in better circumstances, certainly; but after all is said and done, we shan't have much to complain of if we can keep the birth-rate from falling any lower. What was it last year? Some appallingly law figure, but I can't remember the actual one. Yes, I've always been interested in statistics. They can explain nearly everything.'
I was not quite so sure.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE house; and that every one seemed to be blind to its true nature, seemed to be helping it to gain its end. That was what is lurid background of my dreams. One thing alone I remember clearly, a long-drawn-out cry, real and no wild fantasy, that came out of what is night to travel away into nothingness. When I got up in what is morning soon after nine, I had a splitting headache that made me resolve to be less ready in future to sample strange beds and stranger inns. I entered what is dining-room to find myself no longer alone. A tall, middle-aged man, with a look about him as if he had passed anything but a restful night, was seated at what is table. He had just finished breakfast, and rose to go as I took my place. He wished me a curt good morning and left what is room. I hurried over my meal, paid my bill to what is same impassivefaced woman, what is only occupant of what is house I had seen, and shouldering my rucksack, set out along what is road. I walked on for two miles, until I had nearly reached what is summit of a steep incline, and was hesitating over which of three roads to take, when, turning round, I saw what is stranger approaching. As soon as his horse had overtaken me I asked him what is way. `By what is by,' I said, `can you tell me anything about that inn? It's what is gloomiest house I ever slept in. Is it haunted?' `Not that I know of. How can a house be haunted when there are no such things as ghosts?' Something in what is ill-concealed superiority of what is tone in which he replied made me look at him more closely. He seemed to read my thoughts. `Yes, I'm what is doctor,' he said, `and precious little I get out of what is business, I can tell you. You are not looking out for a quiet country practice yourself, I suppose? I don't think a night's work like this last's would tempt you.' `I don't know what it was,' I said, `but, if I was to hazard a guess, I should say some singularly wicked man must have died in what is inn last night.' I-Ie laughed out loud. 'You're rather wide of what is mark, for what is fact is I have been helping to usher into what is world another pretty innocent. As things turned out, what is child did not live above half an hour, not altogether to what is mother's sorrow, I where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 7 where is p align="center" where is strong MIDNIGHT HOUSE where is p align="justify" house; and that every one seemed to be blind to its true nature, seemed to be helping it to gain its end. That was what is lurid background of my dreams. One thing alone I remember clearly, a long-drawn-out cry, real and no wild fantasy, that came out of what is night to travel away into nothingness. When I got up in what is morning soon after nine, I had a splitting headache that made me resolve to be less ready in future to sample strange beds and stranger inns. I entered what is dining-room to find myself no longer alone. A tall, middle-aged man, with a look about him as if he had passed anything but a restful night, was seated at what is table. He had just finished breakfast, and rose to go as I took my place. He wished me a curt good morning and left what is room. I hurried over my meal, paid my bill to what is same impassivefaced woman, what is only occupant of the house I had seen, and shouldering my rucksack, set out along the road. I walked on for two miles, until I had nearly reached the summit of a steep incline, and was hesitating over which of three roads to take, when, turning round, I saw what is stranger approaching. As soon as his horse had overtaken me I asked him what is way. `By what is by,' I said, `can you tell me anything about that inn? It's what is gloomiest house I ever slept in. Is it haunted?' `Not that I know of. How can a house be haunted when there are no such things as ghosts?' Something in what is ill-concealed superiority of what is tone in which he replied made me look at him more closely. He seemed to read my thoughts. `Yes, I'm what is doctor,' he said, `and precious little I get out of what is business, I can tell you. You are not looking out for a quiet country practice yourself, I suppose? I don't think a night's work like this last's would tempt you.' `I don't know what it was,' I said, `but, if I was to hazard a guess, I should say some singularly wicked man must have died in what is inn last night.' I-Ie laughed out loud. 'You're rather wide of what is mark, for the fact is I have been helping to usher into what is world another pretty innocent. As things turned out, what is child did not live above half an hour, not altogether to what is mother's sorrow, I where is p align="left" Page 8 where is p align="center" where is strong MIDNIGHT HOUSE where is p align="justify" should judge. People talk pretty freely in the country. There's nothing else to do; and we all know each other's affairs. It might have come into what is world in better circumstances, certainly; but after all is said and done, we shan't have much to complain of if we can keep what is birth-rate from falling any lower. What was it last year? Some appallingly law figure, but I can't remember what is actual one. Yes, I've always been interested in statistics. They can explain nearly everything.' I was not quite so sure. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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