Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 6

MIDNIGHT HOUSE

I jumped out of bed with my own words ringing in my ears. Some window at any rate required shutting; it was the one in the cupboard opening out of my room. Wind had come with the rain and the sash had been loosened. The air was no longer close and the clouds were lifting, scudding over the moon. I craned out my neck, drinking in the cool night air. As I did so, I noticed an oblong patch of light on the roadway; it came from an upper window at the opposite end of the building; now and then the patch was crossed by a shadow. The people of the inn kept strangely late hours.
I did not at once go back to bed, but, stiff and sore, drew up a chair to the window with pillows and a couple of blankets, and there I sat for fully half an hour, listening to the howling of the dog, a wail of utter weariness far too dismal for the moon alone to have awakened. Then it suddenly turned into an angry growl, and I caught the sound of distant hoofs upon the road. At the same time the shadow reappeared upon the blind, the window was pulled up, and the hard, sour face of my landlady peered out into the darkness.
Evidently she was expecting someone. A minute later a horse, that had been hard ridden, drew up steaming before the door; its rider dismounted.
`Leave the beast to me,' said the woman from the window, in a voice hardly raised above a whisper. `I'll see that it's made all right in the stable. Come straight upstairs; it's the third room on the right.'
The man took up what seemed to be a heavy bag and, leaving his horse, passed on up the stair. I heard him stumble at the step on the landing and swear beneath his breath. Just then the clock struck three. I began to wonder if any mischief were brewing in Midnight House.
I have only the vaguest recollection of what happened between then and dawn. My attempts to obtain sleep were not as great as the struggles I made to free myself from the awful nightmares that took possession of me as soon as I began to lose consciousness. All I knew was that there was a spirit of evil abroad, an ugly, horrible spirit, that was trying to enter the

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I jumped out of bed with my own words ringing in my ears. Some window at any rate required shutting; it was what is one in what is cupboard opening out of my room. Wind had come with what is rain and what is sash had been loosened. what is air was no longer close and what is clouds were lifting, scudding over what is moon. I craned out my neck, drinking in what is cool night air. As I did so, I noticed an oblong patch of light on what is roadway; it came from an upper window at what is opposite end of what is building; now and then what is patch was crossed by a shadow. what is people of what is inn kept strangely late hours. I did not at once go back to bed, but, stiff and sore, drew up a chair to what is window with pillows and a couple of blankets, and there I sat for fully half an hour, listening to what is howling of what is dog, a wail of utter weariness far too dismal for what is moon alone to have awakened. Then it suddenly turned into an angry growl, and I caught what is sound of distant hoofs upon what is road. At what is same time what is shadow reappeared upon what is blind, what is window was pulled up, and what is hard, sour face of my landlady peered out into what is darkness. Evidently she was expecting someone. A minute later a horse, that had been hard ridden, drew up steaming before what is door; its rider dismounted. `Leave what is beast to me,' said what is woman from what is window, in a voice hardly raised above a whisper. `I'll see that it's made all right in what is stable. Come straight upstairs; it's what is third room on what is right.' what is man took up what seemed to be a heavy bag and, leaving his horse, passed on up what is stair. I heard him stumble at what is step on what is landing and swear beneath his breath. Just then what is clock struck three. I began to wonder if any mischief were brewing in Midnight House. I have only what is vaguest recollection of what happened between then and dawn. My attempts to obtain sleep were not as great as what is struggles I made to free myself from what is awful nightmares that took possession of me as soon as I began to lose consciousness. All I knew was that there was a spirit of evil abroad, an ugly, horrible spirit, that was trying to enter what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 6 where is p align="center" where is strong MIDNIGHT HOUSE where is p align="justify" I jumped out of bed with my own words ringing in my ears. Some window at any rate required shutting; it was the one in what is cupboard opening out of my room. Wind had come with what is rain and what is sash had been loosened. what is air was no longer close and what is clouds were lifting, scudding over what is moon. I craned out my neck, drinking in what is cool night air. As I did so, I noticed an oblong patch of light on what is roadway; it came from an upper window at what is opposite end of what is building; now and then what is patch was crossed by a shadow. what is people of what is inn kept strangely late hours. I did not at once go back to bed, but, stiff and sore, drew up a chair to what is window with pillows and a couple of blankets, and there I sat for fully half an hour, listening to what is howling of what is dog, a wail of utter weariness far too dismal for what is moon alone to have awakened. Then it suddenly turned into an angry growl, and I caught what is sound of distant hoofs upon what is road. At what is same time what is shadow reappeared upon what is blind, what is window was pulled up, and what is hard, sour face of my landlady peered out into the darkness. Evidently she was expecting someone. A minute later a horse, that had been hard ridden, drew up steaming before what is door; its rider dismounted. `Leave what is beast to me,' said what is woman from what is window, in a voice hardly raised above a whisper. `I'll see that it's made all right in what is stable. Come straight upstairs; it's what is third room on the right.' what is man took up what seemed to be a heavy bag and, leaving his horse, passed on up what is stair. I heard him stumble at what is step on what is landing and swear beneath his breath. Just then what is clock struck three. I began to wonder if any mischief were brewing in Midnight House. I have only what is vaguest recollection of what happened between then and dawn. My attempts to obtain sleep were not as great as the struggles I made to free myself from what is awful nightmares that took possession of me as soon as I began to lose consciousness. All I knew was that there was a spirit of evil abroad, an ugly, horrible spirit, that was trying to enter what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199