Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 5

MIDNIGHT HOUSE

saying that it was too late to put back, others that the man would perish with cold if we left him there on the shelterless moor. But we were too eager to see the valley of the shadow, and the steersman held on his course. As we left him, a sudden change came across the old man's features; the mask of benevolence vanished; we saw only a face of such utter malignancy that the children in fright ran whimpering to their mothers.
In the boat they whispered his name, how that he was a man for ever seeking to gain entrance to the ferry, that he might accomplish some awful purpose, and in joy at our escape a strange song was raised, which rose and fell like the music of a running stream.
I was awakened by the sound of rain upon the window; the water in the brook outside had already risen and was making itself heard, but with a sound so soothingly monotonous that I was soon asleep again.
Again I dreamed. This time I was a citizen of a great leaguered city. The once fertile plain that stretched from the walls to the dim horizon lay ravaged by the armies that had swept over it. The sun was sinking as a crowd of half-starved wretches came to the western gate, clamouring to come in. They were the peasants, caught between the besieging hosts and the frowning barriers of the city that had no food for mouths other than its own. As I stood at the postern to the right of the main gate with a little knot of companions, a man approached who at once attracted our attention. He was a huge fellow, in the prime of life, straight as a tree, and strong enough to carry an ox. He came up to our leader and asked to be let in. `I have travelled day and night for twelve months,' he said, `that I might fight by your side.' The last sally had cost us dear and we were short of men such as he. `Come in and welcome,' said the captain of the guard at last. He had already taken a key from his breast and was unlocking the postern, when I cried out. Something in the man's face I had recognized; it was that of the old man who had tried to get into the ferry. `He's a spy!' I shouted. `Lock the gates, for God's sake! Shut the window, or he'll climb in!'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE saying that it was too late to put back, others that what is man would perish with cold if we left him there on what is shelterless moor. But we were too eager to see what is valley of what is shadow, and what is steersman held on his course. As we left him, a sudden change came across what is old man's features; what is mask of benevolence vanished; we saw only a face of such utter malignancy that what is children in fright ran whimpering to their mothers. In what is boat they whispered his name, how that he was a man for ever seeking to gain entrance to what is ferry, that he might accomplish some awful purpose, and in joy at our escape a strange song was raised, which rose and fell like what is music of a running stream. I was awakened by what is sound of rain upon what is window; what is water in what is brook outside had already risen and was making itself heard, but with a sound so soothingly monotonous that I was soon asleep again. Again I dreamed. This time I was a citizen of a great leaguered city. what is once fertile plain that stretched from what is walls to what is dim horizon lay ravaged by what is armies that had swept over it. what is sun was sinking as a crowd of half-starved wretches came to what is western gate, clamouring to come in. They were what is peasants, caught between what is besieging hosts and what is frowning barriers of what is city that had no food for mouths other than its own. As I stood at what is postern to what is right of what is main gate with a little knot of companions, a man approached who at once attracted our attention. He was a huge fellow, in what is prime of life, straight as a tree, and strong enough to carry an ox. He came up to our leader and asked to be let in. `I have travelled day and night for twelve months,' he said, `that I might fight by your side.' what is last sally had cost us dear and we were short of men such as he. `Come in and welcome,' said what is captain of what is guard at last. He had already taken a key from his breast and was unlocking what is postern, when I cried out. Something in what is man's face I had recognized; it was that of what is old man who had tried to get into what is ferry. `He's a spy!' I shouted. `Lock what is gates, for God's sake! Shut what is window, or he'll climb in!' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 5 where is p align="center" where is strong MIDNIGHT HOUSE where is p align="justify" saying that it was too late to put back, others that what is man would perish with cold if we left him there on the shelterless moor. But we were too eager to see what is valley of the shadow, and what is steersman held on his course. As we left him, a sudden change came across what is old man's features; what is mask of benevolence vanished; we saw only a face of such utter malignancy that the children in fright ran whimpering to their mothers. In what is boat they whispered his name, how that he was a man for ever seeking to gain entrance to what is ferry, that he might accomplish some awful purpose, and in joy at our escape a strange song was raised, which rose and fell like what is music of a running stream. I was awakened by what is sound of rain upon what is window; what is water in what is brook outside had already risen and was making itself heard, but with a sound so soothingly monotonous that I was soon asleep again. Again I dreamed. This time I was a citizen of a great leaguered city. what is once fertile plain that stretched from what is walls to the dim horizon lay ravaged by what is armies that had swept over it. The sun was sinking as a crowd of half-starved wretches came to the western gate, clamouring to come in. They were what is peasants, caught between what is besieging hosts and what is frowning barriers of what is city that had no food for mouths other than its own. As I stood at the postern to what is right of what is main gate with a little knot of companions, a man approached who at once attracted our attention. He was a huge fellow, in what is prime of life, straight as a tree, and strong enough to carry an ox. He came up to our leader and asked to be let in. `I have travelled day and night for twelve months,' he said, `that I might fight by your side.' what is last sally had cost us dear and we were short of men such as he. `Come in and welcome,' said what is captain of what is guard at last. He had already taken a key from his breast and was unlocking what is postern, when I cried out. Something in what is man's face I had recognized; it was that of the old man who had tried to get into what is ferry. `He's a spy!' I shouted. `Lock what is gates, for God's sake! Shut what is window, or he'll climb in!' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199