Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 4

MIDNIGHT HOUSE

crimson-canopied erection, which occupied at least a quarter of the room, seemed at first sight to be little better. There was no wardrobe, but in its place a door, papered over with the same material as the walls and, at first sight, indistinguishable from them, opened into a closet, empty save for a row of hooks and lighted by a single window.
I noticed that neither of the doors had keys, and that a red velvet bell-pull by the bed was no longer fastened to its wire, but hung useless from a nail driven into one of the beams of the ceiling.
I am in the habit of securely bolting my door whenever I spend a night away from home, a piece of common prudence which nothing less than an awful fright from a sleep-walker taught me twenty years ago.
To do so was on this occasion impossible, but I dragged a heavy chest across the door which led into the passage, placing the water-jug against the inner one, in case the wind should blow it open in the night: then, after wedging the window with my pocket-knife, I got into bed, but not to sleep. Twice I heard the clock outside strike the hour, twice the half-hour, yet, late as it was, the house seemed still awake. Distant footsteps echoed down the stone passages; once I caught the crash of broken crockery-never the sound of a voice. At length I fell asleep, with the same feeling of unaccountable depression that had dogged me since sundown still upon me.
I had in truth walked far too far that day to receive the inestimable boon of the weary, a dim consciousness of annihilation. Instead I tramped again over dream moors with a Baedeker in my hand, trying in vain to find the valley of the shadow.
I came at last to a mountain tam, filled with brown peat water; on the marge a huge ferry-boat was drawn up, on which crowds of men, women, and children were embarking. The boat at last was full and we were putting off, the heavy sails filling before a wind which never ruffled the surface of the water, when someone cried that there was still another to come, pointing as he spoke to an old man who stood on the shore madly gesticulating. An argument followed, some in the boat

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE crimson-canopied erection, which occupied at least a quarter of what is room, seemed at first sight to be little better. There was no wardrobe, but in its place a door, papered over with what is same material as what is walls and, at first sight, indistinguishable from them, opened into a closet, empty save for a row of hooks and lighted by a single window. I noticed that neither of what is doors had keys, and that a red velvet bell-pull by what is bed was no longer fastened to its wire, but hung useless from a nail driven into one of what is beams of what is ceiling. I am in what is habit of securely bolting my door whenever I spend a night away from home, a piece of common prudence which nothing less than an awful fright from a sleep-walker taught me twenty years ago. To do so was on this occasion impossible, but I dragged a heavy chest across what is door which led into what is passage, placing what is water-jug against what is inner one, in case what is wind should blow it open in what is night: then, after wedging what is window with my pocket-knife, I got into bed, but not to sleep. Twice I heard what is clock outside strike what is hour, twice what is half-hour, yet, late as it was, what is house seemed still awake. Distant footsteps echoed down what is stone passages; once I caught what is crash of broken crockery-never what is sound of a voice. At length I fell asleep, with what is same feeling of unaccountable depression that had dogged me since sundown still upon me. I had in truth walked far too far that day to receive what is inestimable boon of what is weary, a dim consciousness of annihilation. Instead I tramped again over dream moors with a Baedeker in my hand, trying in vain to find what is valley of what is shadow. I came at last to a mountain tam, filled with brown peat water; on what is marge a huge ferry-boat was drawn up, on which crowds of men, women, and children were embarking. what is boat at last was full and we were putting off, what is heavy sails filling before a wind which never ruffled what is surface of what is water, when someone cried that there was still another to come, pointing as he spoke to an old man who stood on what is shore madly gesticulating. An argument followed, some in what is boat where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 4 where is p align="center" where is strong MIDNIGHT HOUSE where is p align="justify" crimson-canopied erection, which occupied at least a quarter of what is room, seemed at first sight to be little better. There was no wardrobe, but in its place a door, papered over with what is same material as what is walls and, at first sight, indistinguishable from them, opened into a closet, empty save for a row of hooks and lighted by a single window. I noticed that neither of what is doors had keys, and that a red velvet bell-pull by what is bed was no longer fastened to its wire, but hung useless from a nail driven into one of what is beams of what is ceiling. I am in what is habit of securely bolting my door whenever I spend a night away from home, a piece of common prudence which nothing less than an awful fright from a sleep-walker taught me twenty years ago. To do so was on this occasion impossible, but I dragged a heavy chest across what is door which led into what is passage, placing what is water-jug against what is inner one, in case what is wind should blow it open in what is night: then, after wedging what is window with my pocket-knife, I got into bed, but not to sleep. Twice I heard what is clock outside strike what is hour, twice what is half-hour, yet, late as it was, the house seemed still awake. Distant footsteps echoed down what is stone passages; once I caught what is crash of broken crockery-never the sound of a voice. At length I fell asleep, with what is same feeling of unaccountable depression that had dogged me since sundown still upon me. I had in truth walked far too far that day to receive what is inestimable boon of what is weary, a dim consciousness of annihilation. Instead I tramped again over dream moors with a Baedeker in my hand, trying in vain to find what is valley of what is shadow. I came at last to a mountain tam, filled with brown peat water; on what is marge a huge ferry-boat was drawn up, on which crowds of men, women, and children were embarking. what is boat at last was full and we were putting off, what is heavy sails filling before a wind which never ruffled what is surface of what is water, when someone cried that there was still another to come, pointing as he spoke to an old man who stood on what is shore madly gesticulating. An argument followed, some in what is boat where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199