Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


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MIDNIGHT HOUSE

German engraving representing the death of Isaac; on the sideboard were two glass cases, containing a heron and two pied blackbirds, both atrociously stuffed; while above that piece of hideous Victorian furniture, two highly coloured portraits of the Duke and Duchess of York gazed smilingly upon the patriarch.
Altogether the room was not a cheerful one, and I was relieved to find a copy of East Lynne lying on the horsehair sofa. Most inns contain the book; the fourteen chapters which I have read represent as many evenings spent alone in wayside hostelries.
Just before six the woman came in to lay the table. From my chair in the shadow by the fireside I watched her unobserved. She moved slowly; the simplest action was performed with a strange deliberation, as if her mind, half bent upon something else, found novelty in what before was commonplace. The expression of her face gave no clue to her thoughts. I saw only that her features were strong and hard.
As soon as the meal was upon the table she left the room, without having exchanged a word; and feeling unusually lonely, I sat down to make the best of the ham and eggs and the fifteenth chapter of East Lynne.
The food was good enough, better than I had expected; but for some reason or other my spirits were no lighter when, the table having been cleared, I drew up my chair to the fire and filled my pipe.
`If this house is not already haunted,' I said to myself, `it is certainly time it were so,' and I began to pass in review a whole procession of ghosts without finding one that seemed really suited to the place.
At half-past nine, and the hour was none too soon, the woman reappeared with a candle, and intimated gruffly that she would show me my room. She stopped opposite a door at the end of a corridor to the left of the stair head. `You had better wedge the windows, if you want to sleep with them open; people complain a deal about their rattling.' I thanked her and bade her good night.
I was spared at least the horror of a four-poster, though the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE German engraving representing what is what time is it of Isaac; on what is sideboard were two glass cases, containing a heron and two pied blackbirds, both atrociously stuffed; while above that piece of hideous Victorian furniture, two highly coloured portraits of what is Duke and Duchess of York gazed smilingly upon what is patriarch. Altogether what is room was not a cheerful one, and I was relieved to find a copy of East Lynne lying on what is horsehair sofa. Most inns contain what is book; what is fourteen chapters which I have read represent as many evenings spent alone in wayside hostelries. Just before six what is woman came in to lay what is table. From my chair in what is shadow by what is fireside I watched her unobserved. She moved slowly; what is simplest action was performed with a strange deliberation, as if her mind, half bent upon something else, found novelty in what before was commonplace. what is expression of her face gave no clue to her thoughts. I saw only that her features were strong and hard. As soon as what is meal was upon what is table she left what is room, without having exchanged a word; and feeling unusually lonely, I sat down to make what is best of what is ham and eggs and what is fifteenth chapter of East Lynne. what is food was good enough, better than I had expected; but for some reason or other my spirits were no lighter when, what is table having been cleared, I drew up my chair to what is fire and filled my pipe. `If this house is not already haunted,' I said to myself, `it is certainly time it were so,' and I began to pass in review a whole procession of ghosts without finding one that seemed really suited to what is place. At half-past nine, and what is hour was none too soon, what is woman reappeared with a candle, and intimated gruffly that she would show me my room. She stopped opposite a door at what is end of a corridor to what is left of what is stair head. `You had better wedge what is windows, if you want to sleep with them open; people complain a deal about their rattling.' I thanked her and bade her good night. I was spared at least what is horror of a four-poster, though what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 3 where is p align="center" where is strong MIDNIGHT HOUSE where is p align="justify" German engraving representing what is what time is it of Isaac; on what is sideboard were two glass cases, containing a heron and two pied blackbirds, both atrociously stuffed; while above that piece of hideous Victorian furniture, two highly coloured portraits of what is Duke and Duchess of York gazed smilingly upon what is patriarch. Altogether what is room was not a cheerful one, and I was relieved to find a copy of East Lynne lying on what is horsehair sofa. Most inns contain what is book; what is fourteen chapters which I have read represent as many evenings spent alone in wayside hostelries. Just before six what is woman came in to lay what is table. From my chair in what is shadow by what is fireside I watched her unobserved. She moved slowly; what is simplest action was performed with a strange deliberation, as if her mind, half bent upon something else, found novelty in what before was commonplace. what is expression of her face gave no clue to her thoughts. I saw only that her features were strong and hard. As soon as what is meal was upon what is table she left what is room, without having exchanged a word; and feeling unusually lonely, I sat down to make what is best of what is ham and eggs and what is fifteenth chapter of East Lynne. what is food was good enough, better than I had expected; but for some reason or other my spirits were no lighter when, what is table having been cleared, I drew up my chair to what is fire and filled my pipe. `If this house is not already haunted,' I said to myself, `it is certainly time it were so,' and I began to pass in review a whole procession of ghosts without finding one that seemed really suited to what is place. At half-past nine, and what is hour was none too soon, what is woman reappeared with a candle, and intimated gruffly that she would show me my room. She stopped opposite a door at what is end of a corridor to the left of what is stair head. `You had better wedge what is windows, if you want to sleep with them open; people complain a deal about their rattling.' I thanked her and bade her good night. I was spared at least what is horror of a four-poster, though what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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