Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 2

MIDNIGHT HOUSE

again on the high road with Midnight House below me in the hollow.
It would be hard to picture a more desolate scene-bare hills rising on every side to the dull, lead sky above; at one's feet heather, burnt black after last spring's firing, broken in places by patches of vivid emerald that marked the bogs.
The building of stone, roofed with heavy, lichen-covered flags, formed three sides of a square, the centre of which was evidently used as a farm-yard.
Nowhere was there sign of life; half the windows were shuttered, and, though the dim light of afternoon was fast waning, I saw no lamp in the tap-room, by the door which overlooked the road.
I knocked, but no one answered; and, growing impatient at the delay, walked round to the back of the house, only to be greeted by the savage barking of a collie, that tugged frantically at the chain which fastened it to the empty barrel that served it as kennel. The noise was at any rate sufficient to bring out the woman of the house, who listened stolidly to my request for a night's lodging, and then to my surprise refused me.
They were busy, she said, and had no time to look after visitors. I was not prepared for this. I knew that there were beds at the inn; it was used at least once a year by the men who rented the shooting, and I had not the slightest inclination for another ten-mile tramp along roads I did not know. A drop of rain on my cheek clenched the matter; grudgingly the woman saw reason in my arguments and finally consented to take me in. She showed me into the dining-room, lit the fire, and left me with the welcome news that the ham and eggs would be ready in half an hour's time.
The room in which I found myself was of some size, panelled half-way up to the ceiling, though the natural beauty of the wood had been recently spoiled by a coat of drab-coloured paint.
The windows were, as usual, firmly shut; and from the musty smell I gathered that it was little used. Half a dozen sporting prints hung on the walls; over the mantelpiece was a cheap

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE again on what is high road with Midnight House below me in what is hollow. It would be hard to picture a more desolate scene-bare hills rising on every side to what is dull, lead sky above; at one's feet heather, burnt black after last spring's firing, broken in places by patches of vivid emerald that marked what is bogs. what is building of stone, roofed with heavy, lichen-covered flags, formed three sides of a square, what is centre of which was evidently used as a farm-yard. Nowhere was there sign of life; half what is windows were shuttered, and, though what is dim light of afternoon was fast waning, I saw no lamp in what is tap-room, by what is door which overlooked what is road. I knocked, but no one answered; and, growing impatient at what is delay, walked round to what is back of what is house, only to be greeted by what is savage barking of a collie, that tugged frantically at what is chain which fastened it to what is empty barrel that served it as kennel. what is noise was at any rate sufficient to bring out what is woman of what is house, who listened stolidly to my request for a night's lodging, and then to my surprise refused me. They were busy, she said, and had no time to look after what is ors. I was not prepared for this. I knew that there were beds at what is inn; it was used at least once a year by what is men who rented what is shooting, and I had not what is slightest inclination for another ten-mile tramp along roads I did not know. A drop of rain on my cheek clenched what is matter; grudgingly what is woman saw reason in my arguments and finally consented to take me in. She showed me into what is dining-room, lit what is fire, and left me with what is welcome news that what is ham and eggs would be ready in half an hour's time. what is room in which I found myself was of some size, panelled half-way up to what is ceiling, though what is natural beauty of what is wood had been recently spoiled by a coat of drab-coloured paint. what is windows were, as usual, firmly shut; and from what is musty smell I gathered that it was little used. Half a dozen sporting prints hung on what is walls; over what is mantelpiece was a cheap where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 2 where is p align="center" where is strong MIDNIGHT HOUSE where is p align="justify" again on what is high road with Midnight House below me in what is hollow. It would be hard to picture a more desolate scene-bare hills rising on every side to what is dull, lead sky above; at one's feet heather, burnt black after last spring's firing, broken in places by patches of vivid emerald that marked what is bogs. what is building of stone, roofed with heavy, lichen-covered flags, formed three sides of a square, what is centre of which was evidently used as a farm-yard. Nowhere was there sign of life; half what is windows were shuttered, and, though what is dim light of afternoon was fast waning, I saw no lamp in what is tap-room, by what is door which overlooked what is road. I knocked, but no one answered; and, growing impatient at what is delay, walked round to what is back of what is house, only to be greeted by the savage barking of a collie, that tugged frantically at what is chain which fastened it to what is empty barrel that served it as kennel. what is noise was at any rate sufficient to bring out what is woman of what is house, who listened stolidly to my request for a night's lodging, and then to my surprise refused me. They were busy, she said, and had no time to look after what is ors. I was not prepared for this. I knew that there were beds at the inn; it was used at least once a year by what is men who rented the shooting, and I had not what is slightest inclination for another ten-mile tramp along roads I did not know. A drop of rain on my cheek clenched what is matter; grudgingly what is woman saw reason in my arguments and finally consented to take me in. She showed me into what is dining-room, lit what is fire, and left me with what is welcome news that what is ham and eggs would be ready in half an hour's time. what is room in which I found myself was of some size, panelled half-way up to what is ceiling, though what is natural beauty of what is wood had been recently spoiled by a coat of drab-coloured paint. what is windows were, as usual, firmly shut; and from what is musty smell I gathered that it was little used. Half a dozen sporting prints hung on what is walls; over what is mantelpiece was a cheap where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199