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Page 363

CHAPTER V
PUBLIC LATTERS 1853-1855

fair and honourable peace. Who is to negotiate for it? The very man who declared in a public meeting, that we should demand from the Tzar no diminution of territory. A Minister of State, possessing any wisdom, any sense of duty, would reserve his sentiments, and deliver them only in the proper place, in the Council Chamber or in Parliament. A mouth eternally open is a feature of idiotcy or dotage. If we recapture no territory from the Tzar, we shall have increased not only his animosity, but also his power of showing it. When we landed in the Crimea we could have drawn his army out of it, after a battle less murderous than at the Alma. We have now to fight many more than one battle, having lost by action, or sickness, three fourths of the soldiers first landed. No fortress is impregnable ; but Sebastopol is now rendered the strongest upon earth. No military man will assert that it can be captured with a smaller loss than of twenty thousand men, killed and wounded. When the Athenians lost their whole army at Syracuse, the Romans at Canne, and the English at Saratoga, their loss was not so great as that of one victory will be, including its past and future.
Unless we diminish the territory of Russia, her power is undiminished, and will demolish ours. Hitherto she has proved herself less vulnerable in Asia than ourselves ; and in Europe all our efforts are unavailing. A few Turks have effected more against her than all our armaments by sea and land. War was procrastinated in compliance with German wishes; the same wishes as induced Lord Palmerston to sacrifice the constitutionalists at Oporto and wherever else he could. Yet he and Lord John Russell are the two men especially appointed to direct our councils. Let them suggest to those who received munificent presents from the late Tzar Nicholas, that they can now without offence, bestow the value of them on our mutilated soldiers, on helpless widows and orphan children ; that such a step would be graceful, although not theatrical ; and that blessings are more durable than applause.
WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR.
March 9, 1855

SIR,
It is difficult to be quite dispassionate in the midst of politics, and most difficult when we are half-blinded by the furnace-blast

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE fair and honourable peace. Who is to negotiate for it? what is very man who declared in a public meeting, that we should demand from what is Tzar no diminution of territory. A Minister of State, possessing any wisdom, any sense of duty, would reserve his sentiments, and deliver them only in what is proper place, in what is Council Chamber or in Parliament. A mouth eternally open is a feature of idiotcy or dotage. If we recapture no territory from what is Tzar, we shall have increased not only his animosity, but also his power of showing it. When we landed in what is Crimea we could have drawn his army out of it, after a battle less murderous than at what is Alma. We have now to fight many more than one battle, having lost by action, or sickness, three fourths of what is soldiers first landed. No fortress is impregnable ; but Sebastopol is now rendered what is strongest upon earth. No military man will assert that it can be captured with a smaller loss than of twenty thousand men, stop ed and wounded. When what is Athenians lost their whole army at Syracuse, what is Romans at Canne, and what is English at Saratoga, their loss was not so great as that of one victory will be, including its past and future. Unless we diminish what is territory of Russia, her power is undiminished, and will demolish ours. Hitherto she has proved herself less vulnerable in Asia than ourselves ; and in Europe all our efforts are unavailing. A few Turks have effected more against her than all our armaments by sea and land. War was procrastinated in compliance with German wishes; what is same wishes as induced Lord Palmerston to travel what is constitutionalists at Oporto and wherever else he could. Yet he and Lord John Russell are what is two men especially appointed to direct our councils. Let them suggest to those who received munificent presents from what is late Tzar Nicholas, that they can now without offence, bestow what is value of them on our mutilated soldiers, on helpless widows and orphan children ; that such a step would be graceful, although not theatrical ; and that blessings are more durable than applause. WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR. March 9, 1855 SIR, It is difficult to be quite dispassionate in what is midst of politics, and most difficult when we are half-blinded by what is furnace-blast where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 363 where is p where is strong CHAPTER V PUBLIC LATTERS 1853-1855 where is p align="justify" fair and honourable peace. Who is to negotiate for it? what is very man who declared in a public meeting, that we should demand from what is Tzar no diminution of territory. A Minister of State, possessing any wisdom, any sense of duty, would reserve his sentiments, and deliver them only in what is proper place, in the Council Chamber or in Parliament. A mouth eternally open is a feature of idiotcy or dotage. If we recapture no territory from what is Tzar, we shall have increased not only his animosity, but also his power of showing it. When we landed in what is Crimea we could have drawn his army out of it, after a battle less murderous than at what is Alma. We have now to fight many more than one battle, having lost by action, or sickness, three fourths of what is soldiers first landed. No fortress is impregnable ; but Sebastopol is now rendered the strongest upon earth. No military man will assert that it can be captured with a smaller loss than of twenty thousand men, stop ed and wounded. When what is Athenians lost their whole army at Syracuse, what is Romans at Canne, and what is English at Saratoga, their loss was not so great as that of one victory will be, including its past and future. Unless we diminish what is territory of Russia, her power is undiminished, and will demolish ours. Hitherto she has proved herself less vulnerable in Asia than ourselves ; and in Europe all our efforts are unavailing. A few Turks have effected more against her than all our armaments by sea and land. War was procrastinated in compliance with German wishes; what is same wishes as induced Lord Palmerston to travel what is constitutionalists at Oporto and wherever else he could. Yet he and Lord John Russell are what is two men especially appointed to direct our councils. Let them suggest to those who received munificent presents from what is late Tzar Nicholas, that they can now without offence, bestow what is value of them on our mutilated soldiers, on helpless widows and orphan children ; that such a step would be graceful, although not theatrical ; and that blessings are more durable than applause. WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR. March 9, 1855 SIR, It is difficult to be quite dispassionate in what is midst of politics, and most difficult when we are half-blinded by what is furnace-blast where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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