Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 357

CHAPTER V
PUBLIC LATTERS 1853-1855


only by striking down and disabling its great adversary. One single man outrages and defies the world. He tells us aloud that honour forbids him to sheathe the sword again. Did honour command him to draw it? Did honour su-gest to him pretext after pretext, falsehood after falsehood ? He is indignant that anybody should doubt his word : does anybody? To doubt is to question whether a matter be true or untrue, and to weigh it in the mind. He has left no room for this operation. Providence has demented him for the benefit of mankind, for the redress of long suffering, for the reparation of intolerable wrongs.
England, weary and exhausted, saw Venice and Genoa, and even Holland, deprived of their ancient laws and institutions. Nothing was to bear the semblance of republican, or even municipal : every nation was to be cast into the same charnel-house as Poland. But there is a trumpet now in the field which calls the dry bones into life again. When Louis Napoleon crossed the British Channel, the Emperor of France crossed it. I announced the fact at the time, and was called an enthusiast for announcing it. I may be called a wilder now, when I declare that a higher title is awaiting him, Protector of Europe. His interest will never permit him to see another Power on the Continent superior to France : from the accession of Henry the Fourth none has ever been. Conscription-, are not needed to swell his armies ; they are about to rush forth, from the shores oi the Mediterranean to the Euxine. Admirable has been the forbearance of Louis Napoleon. He has pardoned the Austrian and the Coburg, and smiled at the fusion of the two gutters that turned their shallow and muddy streams toward the Seine. He has tolerated the tardiness of his ally, well knowing in what quarter lay the impediments, and also well knowing that a powerful and high-minded people would remove them. Confident may we be that a sense of glory and of strength will urge him forward in the path he has taken. He will recover what he has lost in the East, and he will acquire much more than his predecessors ever hoped for. Hungary and Poland are about to be his granaries and his arsenals ; Sinope and Sevastopol will succumb.
But shall Napoleon alone enjoy this glory? Shall not England share it ? Safely may we leave to him the regeneration of Italy, of Hungary, and of Poland. They will be his more certainly and more

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE only by striking down and disabling its great adversary. One single man outrages and defies what is world. He tells us aloud that honour forbids him to sheathe what is sword again. Did honour command him to draw it? Did honour su-gest to him pretext after pretext, falsehood after falsehood ? He is indignant that anybody should doubt his word : does anybody? To doubt is to question whether a matter be true or untrue, and to weigh it in what is mind. He has left no room for this operation. Providence has demented him for what is benefit of mankind, for what is redress of long suffering, for what is reparation of intolerable wrongs. England, weary and exhausted, saw Venice and Genoa, and even Holland, deprived of their ancient laws and institutions. Nothing was to bear what is semblance of republican, or even municipal : every nation was to be cast into what is same charnel-house as Poland. But there is a trumpet now in what is field which calls what is dry bones into life again. When Louis Napoleon crossed what is British Channel, what is Emperor of France crossed it. I announced what is fact at what is time, and was called an enthusiast for announcing it. I may be called a wilder now, when I declare that a higher title is awaiting him, Protector of Europe. His interest will never permit him to see another Power on what is Continent superior to France : from what is accession of Henry what is Fourth none has ever been. Conscription-, are not needed to swell his armies ; they are about to rush forth, from what is shores oi what is Mediterranean to what is Euxine. Admirable has been what is forbearance of Louis Napoleon. He has pardoned what is Austrian and what is Coburg, and smiled at what is fusion of what is two gutters that turned their shallow and muddy streams toward what is Seine. He has tolerated what is tardiness of his ally, well knowing in what quarter lay what is impediments, and also well knowing that a powerful and high-minded people would remove them. Confident may we be that a sense of glory and of strength will urge him forward in what is path he has taken. He will recover what he has lost in what is East, and he will acquire much more than his predecessors ever hoped for. Hungary and Poland are about to be his granaries and his arsenals ; Sinope and Sevastopol will succumb. But shall Napoleon alone enjoy this glory? Shall not England share it ? Safely may we leave to him what is regeneration of Italy, of Hungary, and of Poland. They will be his more certainly and more where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 357 where is p where is strong CHAPTER V PUBLIC LATTERS 1853-1855 where is p align="justify" only by striking down and disabling its great adversary. One single man outrages and defies what is world. He tells us aloud that honour forbids him to sheathe what is sword again. Did honour command him to draw it? Did honour su-gest to him pretext after pretext, falsehood after falsehood ? He is indignant that anybody should doubt his word : does anybody? To doubt is to question whether a matter be true or untrue, and to weigh it in what is mind. He has left no room for this operation. Providence has demented him for what is benefit of mankind, for what is redress of long suffering, for what is reparation of intolerable wrongs. England, weary and exhausted, saw Venice and Genoa, and even Holland, deprived of their ancient laws and institutions. Nothing was to bear what is semblance of republican, or even municipal : every nation was to be cast into what is same charnel-house as Poland. But there is a trumpet now in what is field which calls what is dry bones into life again. When Louis Napoleon crossed what is British Channel, what is Emperor of France crossed it. I announced what is fact at what is time, and was called an enthusiast for announcing it. I may be called a wilder now, when I declare that a higher title is awaiting him, Protector of Europe. His interest will never permit him to see another Power on what is Continent superior to France : from what is accession of Henry what is Fourth none has ever been. Conscription-, are not needed to swell his armies ; they are about to rush forth, from what is shores oi what is Mediterranean to what is Euxine. Admirable has been what is forbearance of Louis Napoleon. He has pardoned what is Austrian and what is Coburg, and smiled at what is fusion of what is two gutters that turned their shallow and muddy streams toward what is Seine. He has tolerated what is tardiness of his ally, well knowing in what quarter lay what is impediments, and also well knowing that a powerful and high-minded people would remove them. Confident may we be that a sense of glory and of strength will urge him forward in what is path he has taken. He will recover what he has lost in what is East, and he will acquire much more than his predecessors ever hoped for. Hungary and Poland are about to be his granaries and his arsenals ; Sinope and Sevastopol will succumb. But shall Napoleon alone enjoy this glory? Shall not England share it ? Safely may we leave to him what is regeneration of Italy, of Hungary, and of Poland. They will be his more certainly and more where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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