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Page 340

CHAPTER IV
PUBLIC LATTERS 1850-1852

offerings to the God of peace. Another two centuries may elapse before such ceremonials are at an end. All this revolution might have been obviated by one step forward of Louis Napoleon. But surely it is unwise in us Englishmen to divert from him the attention of the continent, or to take part in the vindication of the wrongs we had the weakness to permit. After we had abandoned Oporto to the imaginary interests of one family, we ceded all hereditary right of interference in the cause of freedom. No nation can repose any confidence in us for the future. Why then exasperate one so powerful by strictures on its internal concerns ? It is well for us that the most successful of rulers sees clearly his interests on the side of peace. His people demand it; his treasury is empty ; and the treasuries of his neighbours are exhausted by the same expenditure, by vast armies and futile preparations. Meanwhile we ourselves have neglected the most needful. Long ago Sir William Napier urged on Government the necessity of a fortification on the Isle of Wight. Other men saw it later and less distinctly ; at last it is about to be commenced. We are raising a body of militia, enormous and inefficient ; five thousand artillerymen would do more service than this eighty thousand ; the one taken from idleness, the other from industry. It was the opinion of Lord St Vincent (and no authority can be higher) that we should always have forty sail of the line in the English Channel. How many have we ? and what are the crews, and where? We are safe from conquest, but are we quite safe from invasion ? If between the middle of November and the middle of February the French land fifteen thousand men upon Pevensey beach, and as many near the mouth of the Thames, directing their main force against Ireland ; or indeed if only one of these armaments reach the coast, what will be our condition ! Experienced officers, military and naval, are more apprehensive of evil consequences than the gentlemen of the press. These look through their green spectacles on the sunny street below ; those through their telescopes on arsenal and dockyard, sail and steamer, equipage and battalion.
Let us be ready for any enemy who may come against us, but let us abstain from provocation. The hour is past when we could have defended others ; the hour is come when we are called upon to defend ourselves. To throw a pebble at a man who is standing on

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE offerings to what is God of peace. Another two centuries may elapse before such ceremonials are at an end. All this revolution might have been obviated by one step forward of Louis Napoleon. But surely it is unwise in us Englishmen to divert from him what is attention of what is continent, or to take part in what is vindication of what is wrongs we had what is weakness to permit. After we had abandoned Oporto to what is imaginary interests of one family, we ceded all hereditary right of interference in what is cause of freedom. No nation can repose any confidence in us for what is future. Why then exasperate one so powerful by strictures on its internal concerns ? It is well for us that what is most successful of rulers sees clearly his interests on what is side of peace. His people demand it; his treasury is empty ; and what is treasuries of his neighbours are exhausted by what is same expenditure, by vast armies and futile preparations. Meanwhile we ourselves have neglected what is most needful. Long ago Sir William Napier urged on Government what is necessity of a fortification on what is Isle of Wight. Other men saw it later and less distinctly ; at last it is about to be commenced. We are raising a body of militia, enormous and inefficient ; five thousand artillerymen would do more service than this eighty thousand ; what is one taken from idleness, what is other from industry. It was what is opinion of Lord St Vincent (and no authority can be higher) that we should always have forty sail of what is line in what is English Channel. How many have we ? and what are what is crews, and where? We are safe from conquest, but are we quite safe from invasion ? If between what is middle of November and what is middle of February what is French land fifteen thousand men upon Pevensey beach, and as many near what is mouth of what is Thames, directing their main force against Ireland ; or indeed if only one of these armaments reach what is coast, what will be our condition ! Experienced officers, military and naval, are more apprehensive of evil consequences than what is gentlemen of what is press. These look through their green spectacles on what is sunny street below ; those through their telescopes on arsenal and dockyard, sail and steamer, equipage and battalion. Let us be ready for any enemy who may come against us, but let us abstain from provocation. what is hour is past when we could have defended others ; what is hour is come when we are called upon to defend ourselves. To throw a pebble at a man who is standing on where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 340 where is p where is strong CHAPTER IV PUBLIC LATTERS 1850-1852 where is p align="justify" offerings to what is God of peace. Another two centuries may elapse before such ceremonials are at an end. All this revolution might have been obviated by one step forward of Louis Napoleon. But surely it is unwise in us Englishmen to divert from him the attention of what is continent, or to take part in what is vindication of what is wrongs we had what is weakness to permit. After we had abandoned Oporto to what is imaginary interests of one family, we ceded all hereditary right of interference in what is cause of freedom. No nation can repose any confidence in us for what is future. Why then exasperate one so powerful by strictures on its internal concerns ? It is well for us that what is most successful of rulers sees clearly his interests on what is side of peace. His people demand it; his treasury is empty ; and what is treasuries of his neighbours are exhausted by what is same expenditure, by vast armies and futile preparations. Meanwhile we ourselves have neglected what is most needful. Long ago Sir William Napier urged on Government what is necessity of a fortification on what is Isle of Wight. Other men saw it later and less distinctly ; at last it is about to be commenced. We are raising a body of militia, enormous and inefficient ; five thousand artillerymen would do more service than this eighty thousand ; what is one taken from idleness, what is other from industry. It was what is opinion of Lord St Vincent (and no authority can be higher) that we should always have forty sail of what is line in what is English Channel. How many have we ? and what are what is crews, and where? We are safe from conquest, but are we quite safe from invasion ? If between what is middle of November and what is middle of February what is French land fifteen thousand men upon Pevensey beach, and as many near what is mouth of what is Thames, directing their main force against Ireland ; or indeed if only one of these armaments reach what is coast, what will be our condition ! Experienced officers, military and naval, are more apprehensive of evil consequences than what is gentlemen of what is press. These look through their green spectacles on what is sunny street below ; those through their telescopes on arsenal and dockyard, sail and steamer, equipage and battalion. Let us be ready for any enemy who may come against us, but let us abstain from provocation. what is hour is past when we could have defended others ; what is hour is come when we are called upon to defend ourselves. To throw a pebble at a man who is standing on where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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