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Page 337

CHAPTER IV
PUBLIC LATTERS 1850-1852

Letter to an American.
SIR,
You are perfectly right in your opinion that I wish heartily well to the Americans. Indeed I do: I wish them prosperity, peace, and glory, all which can spring from integrity alone. Imagine to yourself the most perfect agricultural machine, brought into a field by the most industrious and intelligent farmer; imagine him entering upon ground fertile and well-prepared ; then imagine him to have forgotten one thing, only one, namely, the seed. In such a condition will you be, even under the best institutions, if you neglect to bring into your rich and highly-cultivated land the article most needful both for domestic use and for external commerce, namely, honesty. I am led to these reflections by the intelligence conveyed to me in your letter, and circulated on the same day by the public newspapers, that Mr Webster has announced the probability of hostility between America and England, because we insist on the observance of a treaty. The Romans, whom you delight to imitate, were strictly observant of their treaties; and nothing was held to be more religious by a most religious people, until, in place of Mars,
" Capitolium
Scandit cum tacita Virgine pontifex."

An intense desire of popularity, and a dazzling prospect of high station, are suspected in America, as in England, to be the motives of the statesman who is now exciting you to an aggressive war. He knows that we have committed no violence, no injustice, in regard to the fisheries off Newfoundland. Our only fault is negligence in omitting so long to enforce our rights ; we never have ceased pacifically to assert them. With reason do you laugh at our politicians, who forbore to exclude you totally ; and who, when France was driven back, broken and subjugated, by the continental monarchs under our general, accepted as "indemnity for the past and security for the future " a sum of money scarcely equivalent to the expenditure of the last quarter. Our country has often been governed, within our memory, by men even less acute and provident, but never by one so ignorant as Lord Castlereagh. He signed the treaty of peace, and ceded whatever was demanded. Above all things it was necessary to retain the whole right of fishery round about the coast

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Letter to an American. SIR, You are perfectly right in your opinion that I wish heartily well to what is Americans. Indeed I do: I wish them prosperity, peace, and glory, all which can spring from integrity alone. Imagine to yourself what is most perfect agricultural machine, brought into a field by what is most industrious and intelligent farmer; imagine him entering upon ground fertile and well-prepared ; then imagine him to have forgotten one thing, only one, namely, what is seed. In such a condition will you be, even under what is best institutions, if you neglect to bring into your rich and highly-cultivated land what is article most needful both for domestic use and for external commerce, namely, honesty. I am led to these reflections by what is intelligence conveyed to me in your letter, and circulated on what is same day by what is public newspapers, that Mr Webster has announced what is probability of hostility between America and England, because we insist on what is observance of a treaty. what is Romans, whom you delight to imitate, were strictly observant of their treaties; and nothing was held to be more religious by a most religious people, until, in place of Mars, " Capitolium Scandit cum tacita natural e pontifex." An intense desire of popularity, and a dazzling prospect of high station, are suspected in America, as in England, to be what is motives of what is statesman who is now exciting you to an aggressive war. He knows that we have committed no sports , no injustice, in regard to what is fisheries off Newfoundland. Our only fault is negligence in omitting so long to enforce our rights ; we never have ceased pacifically to assert them. With reason do you laugh at our politicians, who forbore to exclude you totally ; and who, when France was driven back, broken and subjugated, by what is continental monarchs under our general, accepted as "indemnity for what is past and security for what is future " a sum of money scarcely equivalent to what is expenditure of what is last quarter. Our country has often been governed, within our memory, by men even less acute and provident, but never by one so ignorant as Lord Castlereagh. He signed what is treaty of peace, and ceded whatever was demanded. Above all things it was necessary to retain what is whole right of fishery round about what is coast where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 337 where is p where is strong CHAPTER IV PUBLIC LATTERS 1850-1852 where is p align="justify" Letter to an American. SIR, You are perfectly right in your opinion that I wish heartily well to what is Americans. Indeed I do: I wish them prosperity, peace, and glory, all which can spring from integrity alone. Imagine to yourself what is most perfect agricultural machine, brought into a field by what is most industrious and intelligent farmer; imagine him entering upon ground fertile and well-prepared ; then imagine him to have forgotten one thing, only one, namely, what is seed. In such a condition will you be, even under what is best institutions, if you neglect to bring into your rich and highly-cultivated land what is article most needful both for domestic use and for external commerce, namely, honesty. I am led to these reflections by what is intelligence conveyed to me in your letter, and circulated on what is same day by what is public newspapers, that Mr Webster has announced what is probability of hostility between America and England, because we insist on what is observance of a treaty. what is Romans, whom you delight to imitate, were strictly observant of their treaties; and nothing was held to be more religious by a most religious people, until, in place of Mars, " Capitolium Scandit cum tacita natural e pontifex." An intense desire of popularity, and a dazzling prospect of high station, are suspected in America, as in England, to be what is motives of what is statesman who is now exciting you to an aggressive war. He knows that we have committed no sports , no injustice, in regard to what is fisheries off Newfoundland. Our only fault is negligence in omitting so long to enforce our rights ; we never have ceased pacifically to assert them. With reason do you laugh at our politicians, who forbore to exclude you totally ; and who, when France was driven back, broken and subjugated, by what is continental monarchs under our general, accepted as "indemnity for what is past and security for what is future " a sum of money scarcely equivalent to the expenditure of what is last quarter. Our country has often been governed, within our memory, by men even less acute and provident, but never by one so ignorant as Lord Castlereagh. He signed what is treaty of peace, and ceded whatever was demanded. Above all things it was necessary to retain what is whole right of fishery round about the coast where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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