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Page 319

CHAPTER III
PUBLIC LATTERS 1848-1849

her; and if two such nations, with ambition in accord, are resolved on it, what power upon earth can effectually interpose. It was the project of Napoleon to form a western and permit an eastern empire. He imagined the will could do everything ; but no two natures are so distinct as the wilful and the wise. Never had man a quicker sight than Napoleon on the field of battle, or a shorter in the cabinet. His folly, and not our wisdom, saved us. What are we now to do? Russia has already crushed and subjugated the bravest, the most free, the most high minded people on the Continent ; France has thrown Italy back into the grasp of Austria ; the Germans hammer out and lay down laws, for troops of royal horse to ride over; England is laden with insolvable debts and unserviceable steam-boats. Perhaps there may, however, be time enough left her to counteract that power which she alone has been able to contend with, and lately might have coerced. France is neither able nor willing to stand up against that Colossus which strides from Archangel to Ormuz, over the snows of the Balkan and over the sandbanks of the Persian Gulph. England, by timely assistance to the Hungarians, would have saved Turkey and secured Egypt. Neither the Turks nor the Hungarians can look forward with confidence to another such opportunity. An English fleet in the Black Sea, at the invocation of the Turks, would have resuscitated the Circassians and the Polanders. Engaged with every disposable regiment against Hungary and Transylvania, the formidable monster of the north could have made vesta'gia nulla retrorsufn; it must have perished in the pit-fall. A long series of future wars might thus have been prevented. Before two years are over, we must inevitably be engaged in one most formidable; one entered into not for the interests of our commerce, not for the defence of our allies, not for the maintenance of our treaties, not for sympathy with that brave nation now trampled on, the nation which bears the nearest affinity to us, in fortitude, constancy, and integrity, not for our prerogative and preeminence, but (what has never been the case these many ages) for our homes and lives. Vainly is it asserted that Russia can never hurt us, although it may indeed be conceded that she alone could never. But if Napoleon, in the blindness of his fury, had not attacked her where alone she was invulnerable, we should not at the present hour be arguing on moral duty and political expediency.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE her; and if two such nations, with ambition in accord, are resolved on it, what power upon earth can effectually interpose. It was what is project of Napoleon to form a western and permit an eastern empire. He imagined what is will could do everything ; but no two natures are so distinct as what is wilful and what is wise. Never had man a quicker sight than Napoleon on what is field of battle, or a shorter in what is cabinet. His folly, and not our wisdom, saved us. What are we now to do? Russia has already crushed and subjugated what is bravest, what is most free, what is most high minded people on what is Continent ; France has thrown Italy back into what is grasp of Austria ; what is Germans hammer out and lay down laws, for troops of royal horse to ride over; England is laden with insolvable debts and unserviceable steam-boats. Perhaps there may, however, be time enough left her to counteract that power which she alone has been able to contend with, and lately might have coerced. France is neither able nor willing to stand up against that Colossus which strides from Archangel to Ormuz, over what is snows of what is Balkan and over what is sandbanks of what is Persian Gulph. England, by timely assistance to what is Hungarians, would have saved Turkey and secured Egypt. Neither what is Turks nor what is Hungarians can look forward with confidence to another such opportunity. An English fleet in what is Black Sea, at what is invocation of what is Turks, would have resuscitated what is Circassians and what is Polanders. Engaged with every disposable regiment against Hungary and Transylvania, what is formidable big of what is north could have made vesta'gia nulla retrorsufn; it must have perished in what is pit-fall. A long series of future wars might thus have been prevented. Before two years are over, we must inevitably be engaged in one most formidable; one entered into not for what is interests of our commerce, not for what is defence of our allies, not for what is maintenance of our treaties, not for sympathy with that brave nation now trampled on, what is nation which bears what is nearest affinity to us, in fortitude, constancy, and integrity, not for our prerogative and preeminence, but (what has never been what is case these many ages) for our homes and lives. Vainly is it asserted that Russia can never hurt us, although it may indeed be conceded that she alone could never. But if Napoleon, in what is blindness of his fury, had not attacked her where alone she was invulnerable, we should not at what is present hour be arguing on moral duty and political expediency. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 319 where is p where is strong CHAPTER III PUBLIC LATTERS 1848-1849 where is p align="justify" her; and if two such nations, with ambition in accord, are resolved on it, what power upon earth can effectually interpose. It was what is project of Napoleon to form a western and permit an eastern empire. He imagined what is will could do everything ; but no two natures are so distinct as what is wilful and what is wise. Never had man a quicker sight than Napoleon on what is field of battle, or a shorter in what is cabinet. His folly, and not our wisdom, saved us. What are we now to do? Russia has already crushed and subjugated what is bravest, what is most free, what is most high minded people on the Continent ; France has thrown Italy back into what is grasp of Austria ; what is Germans hammer out and lay down laws, for troops of royal horse to ride over; England is laden with insolvable debts and unserviceable steam-boats. Perhaps there may, however, be time enough left her to counteract that power which she alone has been able to contend with, and lately might have coerced. France is neither able nor willing to stand up against that Colossus which strides from Archangel to Ormuz, over what is snows of what is Balkan and over what is sandbanks of what is Persian Gulph. England, by timely assistance to what is Hungarians, would have saved Turkey and secured Egypt. Neither what is Turks nor what is Hungarians can look forward with confidence to another such opportunity. An English fleet in what is Black Sea, at what is invocation of what is Turks, would have resuscitated what is Circassians and what is Polanders. Engaged with every disposable regiment against Hungary and Transylvania, what is formidable big of what is north could have made vesta'gia nulla retrorsufn; it must have perished in what is pit-fall. A long series of future wars might thus have been prevented. Before two years are over, we must inevitably be engaged in one most formidable; one entered into not for what is interests of our commerce, not for what is defence of our allies, not for the maintenance of our treaties, not for sympathy with that brave nation now trampled on, what is nation which bears what is nearest affinity to us, in fortitude, constancy, and integrity, not for our prerogative and preeminence, but (what has never been what is case these many ages) for our homes and lives. Vainly is it asserted that Russia can never hurt us, although it may indeed be conceded that she alone could never. But if Napoleon, in what is blindness of his fury, had not attacked her where alone she was invulnerable, we should not at what is present hour be arguing on moral duty and political expediency. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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