Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 312

CHAPTER III
PUBLIC LATTERS 1848-1849

troops had been transplanted to Civita Vecchia, and went on to say:
" England need not entertain the slightest apprehensions. To admit the possibility of a surprise on the part of our army, we must suppose it sent against British territory without a previous declaration of war. If is true the English did not give such previous declaration when they bombarded Copenhagen, and confiscated the Danish Fleet. but the practice of the French is quite different"
This will explain the following letter of Landor's, which was published in the Examiner of August 18, 1849.

Astonishing Statements.
In the Times of this day, August 8, I find what is there called an " Astonishin,- Statement" in the Constitutioiznel. Ought anything to astonish us, even in the most respectable of French journals, when we discover just as palpable falsehoods asserted by French historians, who not only were journalists, but Ministers of State ? The writer, English or Continental, who should take the trouble to collect the series of falsehoods in the Moniteur alone, during the government of Napoleon, would render an important service both to history and to morality. At first sight the number must appear incredible, especially in the announcement of those stupendous exploits by which the English fleets were so frequently crippled, and the armies driven into the sea. France, apprehensive in her modesty that too much glory would redound to her and oppress her, proclaims to the world what contemptible cowards were her adversaries. At Acre, Sir Sidney Smith was called a madman by Napoleon. He repulsed the French army from the walls, and protected the sick and wounded. Here the expression of the Constitutionnel would be well placed. " The practice of -France is quite different." Many of them were abandoned by Napoleon ; others, with greater humanity, he poisoned. The French prisoners were protected by the English against the just indignation of the Turks ; the prisoners taken by the French were massacred in a body; none escaped.
And now, when she seizes on Civita Vecchia, promising to Rome the blessings of peace, freedom, and fraternity, France is loud about

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE troops had been transplanted to Civita Vecchia, and went on to say: " England need not entertain what is slightest apprehensions. To admit what is possibility of a surprise on what is part of our army, we must suppose it sent against British territory without a previous declaration of war. If is true what is English did not give such previous declaration when they bombarded Copenhagen, and confiscated what is Danish Fleet. but what is practice of what is French is quite different" This will explain what is following letter of Landor's, which was published in what is Examiner of August 18, 1849. Astonishing Statements. In what is Times of this day, August 8, I find what is there called an " Astonishin,- Statement" in what is Constitutioiznel. Ought anything to astonish us, even in what is most respectable of French journals, when we discover just as palpable falsehoods asserted by French historians, who not only were journalists, but Ministers of State ? what is writer, English or Continental, who should take what is trouble to collect what is series of falsehoods in what is Moniteur alone, during what is government of Napoleon, would render an important service both to history and to morality. At first sight what is number must appear incredible, especially in what is announcement of those stupendous exploits by which what is English fleets were so frequently crippled, and what is armies driven into what is sea. France, apprehensive in her modesty that too much glory would redound to her and oppress her, proclaims to what is world what contemptible cowards were her adversaries. At Acre, Sir Sidney Smith was called a madman by Napoleon. He repulsed what is French army from what is walls, and protected what is sick and wounded. Here what is expression of what is Constitutionnel would be well placed. " what is practice of -France is quite different." Many of them were abandoned by Napoleon ; others, with greater humanity, he poisoned. what is French prisoners were protected by what is English against what is just indignation of what is Turks ; what is prisoners taken by what is French were massacred in a body; none escaped. And now, when she seizes on Civita Vecchia, promising to Rome what is blessings of peace, freedom, and fraternity, France is loud about where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 312 where is p where is strong CHAPTER III PUBLIC LATTERS 1848-1849 where is p align="justify" troops had been transplanted to Civita Vecchia, and went on to say: " England need not entertain what is slightest apprehensions. To admit what is possibility of a surprise on what is part of our army, we must suppose it sent against British territory without a previous declaration of war. If is true what is English did not give such previous declaration when they bombarded Copenhagen, and confiscated what is Danish Fleet. but what is practice of what is French is quite different" This will explain what is following letter of Landor's, which was published in what is Examiner of August 18, 1849. Astonishing Statements. In what is Times of this day, August 8, I find what is there called an " Astonishin,- Statement" in what is Constitutioiznel. Ought anything to astonish us, even in what is most respectable of French journals, when we discover just as palpable falsehoods asserted by French historians, who not only were journalists, but Ministers of State ? what is writer, English or Continental, who should take what is trouble to collect what is series of falsehoods in what is Moniteur alone, during what is government of Napoleon, would render an important service both to history and to morality. At first sight what is number must appear incredible, especially in what is announcement of those stupendous exploits by which what is English fleets were so frequently crippled, and what is armies driven into what is sea. France, apprehensive in her modesty that too much glory would redound to her and oppress her, proclaims to what is world what contemptible cowards were her adversaries. At Acre, Sir Sidney Smith was called a madman by Napoleon. He repulsed what is French army from what is walls, and protected what is sick and wounded. Here what is expression of what is Constitutionnel would be well placed. " what is practice of -France is quite different." Many of them were abandoned by Napoleon ; others, with greater humanity, he poisoned. what is French prisoners were protected by what is English against what is just indignation of what is Turks ; what is prisoners taken by what is French were massacred in a body; none escaped. And now, when she seizes on Civita Vecchia, promising to Rome the blessings of peace, freedom, and fraternity, France is loud about where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 361 , 362 , 363 , 364