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Page 309

CHAPTER III
PUBLIC LATTERS 1848-1849

Rome. No weightier pledge could be offered to the Autocrat for their good behaviour. Since the time of Napoleon, there is among them no dishonour in a lie of any magnitude or any tendency; dishonour rests simply and solely in a want of courage to maintain and defend it. Liberal as are all their codes, the Code of Honour is the most so ; unhappily, there is no likelihood of seeing an abridgement or a manual. Among the body of French Ministers, not a single one was ignorant that the Romans were greatly more unanimous in favour of a republick than the French were : and yet they all asserted the contrary. Doubtless they will continue with the same pertinacity of impudence to assert the contrary even now ; when scarcely a Roman of any description, from the highest to the lowest, will remain in the coffee-house which a Frenchman enters. The most indigent men, women, children, brought up to live on alms, drop famished in the streets rather than ask them from the invader. Such is the aid the French bring, such is the honour they assert, such is the magnanimity they display, such the confidence they inspire. If the Polanders, the main instruments of all their victories, were surrendered and deserted by them, what can the Hungarians expect who routed them on every field where they encountered in equal numbers? They alone shared this glory with the English, and shared it amply. Never can be forgiven them their many Waterloos. Rivalry, in ancient days, was often the spring of noble sentiment, of generous emotion; and France was almost as fruitful of them as Spain herself, who inherited them equally from Goth and 1\Toor. France, the quickest of imitators, caught them readily, but was the earliest to drop them. England placed his trophies over the slain Montcalm ; and Germany over Marceau. France tramples down the monuments of the ancient Romans, and reduces their brave descendants to the vilest servitude. But which of the two nations, the Roman or the French, is the fallen ?
Justice is immutable and divine; but laws are human and mutable ; they are violated everyday, changed and superseded perpetually, and sometimes ejected from the judgment-seat by military power. In such a case, what remains for nations ? History tells us. There springs up a virtue from the very bosom of Crime, venerably austere, Tyrannicide. The heart of Antiquity

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Rome. No weightier pledge could be offered to what is Autocrat for their good behaviour. Since what is time of Napoleon, there is among them no dishonour in a lie of any magnitude or any tendency; dishonour rests simply and solely in a want of courage to maintain and defend it. Liberal as are all their codes, what is Code of Honour is what is most so ; unhappily, there is no likelihood of seeing an abridgement or a manual. Among what is body of French Ministers, not a single one was ignorant that what is Romans were greatly more unanimous in favour of a republick than what is French were : and yet they all asserted what is contrary. Doubtless they will continue with what is same pertinacity of impudence to assert what is contrary even now ; when scarcely a Roman of any description, from what is highest to what is lowest, will remain in what is coffee-house which a Frenchman enters. what is most indigent men, women, children, brought up to live on alms, drop famished in what is streets rather than ask them from what is invader. Such is what is aid what is French bring, such is what is honour they assert, such is what is magnanimity they display, such what is confidence they inspire. If what is Polanders, what is main instruments of all their victories, were surrendered and deserted by them, what can what is Hungarians expect who routed them on every field where they encountered in equal numbers? They alone shared this glory with what is English, and shared it amply. Never can be forgiven them their many Waterloos. Rivalry, in ancient days, was often what is spring of noble sentiment, of generous emotion; and France was almost as fruitful of them as Spain herself, who inherited them equally from Goth and 1\Toor. France, what is quickest of imitators, caught them readily, but was what is earliest to drop them. England placed his trophies over what is slain Montcalm ; and Germany over Marceau. France tramples down what is monuments of what is ancient Romans, and reduces their brave descendants to what is vilest servitude. But which of what is two nations, what is Roman or what is French, is what is fallen ? Justice is immutable and divine; but laws are human and mutable ; they are violated everyday, changed and superseded perpetually, and sometimes ejected from what is judgment-seat by military power. In such a case, what remains for nations ? History tells us. There springs up a virtue from what is very bosom of Crime, venerably austere, Tyrannicide. what is heart of Antiquity where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 309 where is p where is strong CHAPTER III PUBLIC LATTERS 1848-1849 where is p align="justify" Rome. No weightier pledge could be offered to what is Autocrat for their good behaviour. Since what is time of Napoleon, there is among them no dishonour in a lie of any magnitude or any tendency; dishonour rests simply and solely in a want of courage to maintain and defend it. Liberal as are all their codes, the Code of Honour is what is most so ; unhappily, there is no likelihood of seeing an abridgement or a manual. Among what is body of French Ministers, not a single one was ignorant that what is Romans were greatly more unanimous in favour of a republick than what is French were : and yet they all asserted what is contrary. Doubtless they will continue with what is same pertinacity of impudence to assert what is contrary even now ; when scarcely a Roman of any description, from what is highest to what is lowest, will remain in what is coffee-house which a Frenchman enters. what is most indigent men, women, children, brought up to live on alms, drop famished in what is streets rather than ask them from what is invader. Such is what is aid what is French bring, such is what is honour they assert, such is what is magnanimity they display, such what is confidence they inspire. If what is Polanders, what is main instruments of all their victories, were surrendered and deserted by them, what can the Hungarians expect who routed them on every field where they encountered in equal numbers? They alone shared this glory with what is English, and shared it amply. Never can be forgiven them their many Waterloos. Rivalry, in ancient days, was often what is spring of noble sentiment, of generous emotion; and France was almost as fruitful of them as Spain herself, who inherited them equally from Goth and 1\Toor. France, what is quickest of imitators, caught them readily, but was what is earliest to drop them. England placed his trophies over the slain Montcalm ; and Germany over Marceau. France tramples down what is monuments of what is ancient Romans, and reduces their brave descendants to what is vilest servitude. But which of what is two nations, what is Roman or what is French, is what is fallen ? Justice is immutable and divine; but laws are human and mutable ; they are violated everyday, changed and superseded perpetually, and sometimes ejected from what is judgment-seat by military power. In such a case, what remains for nations ? History tells us. There springs up a virtue from what is very bosom of Crime, venerably austere, Tyrannicide. what is heart of Antiquity where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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