Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 302

CHAPTER III
PUBLIC LATTERS 1848-1849

was hostile to a friendly state, or treacherous to any. Yet these wretches well deserved the dishonourable death that overtook them, followed by the scorn and execration of posterity. The pages of French history, mildewed all over with large spots of perfidy, exhibit none of so deep and so corrosive a stain as this recently printed in large Roman letters. Fresh falsehood from the mouths of the ministers who defend it, can only produce the same effect as pouring sweet must on rancid wine.
The flatterers of power are always the haters of misfortune. It is probable that a majority of the French, even of the most vociferous for a Republic, will be as supple to the half-Napoleon as their fathers were to the whole one ; and that despotism will become in a few months hence as fashionable as democracy was a few months ago. Surely, M. de Tocqueville, a gentleman, a scholar, a man hitherto irreproachable, will be able to stem the muddy current of the Cloaca Maxima into the midst of which he has fallen. Surely he must discern the impolicy, no less than the injustice, of murdering the Roman people and of battering down the city. The falsehood, the dishonesty, the trickery, the bigotry, of those among his associates in the Ministry, who pretended to doubt the sentiments and resolution of the Roman people, are now sufficiently manifest by its unanimity in defending the ancient honour and ancient domicile of Romans. In the eyes of such people as MM. Falloux and Barrot, such a defence may be highly criminal, and French honour (how different from Roman and English !) may demand its expiation. But the hands of M. de Tocqueville are inexpert in trickery, and his tongue has never been transferable and at a discount. Such is the great advantage he possesses over his colleagues. His knowledge of history will enlighten him. He will see clearly not only that France has broken faith, but has done it thrice in rapid succession. First, in exciting to revolt ; secondly, in seizing the maritime city of a friendly power and the arms prepared for its defence; thirdly, in attacking Rome before the time promised to wait for hostilities. Even her own ambassador was ashamed of the ruffian who perpetrated this last atrocity, the least atrocity of the three. Europe cried out against the injustice and rapacity of the despots who dismembered Poland ; but neither the violence nor the perfidy of these potentates, in half a century, is comparable to the violence and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE was hostile to a friendly state, or treacherous to any. Yet these wretches well deserved what is dishonourable what time is it that overtook them, followed by what is scorn and execration of posterity. what is pages of French history, mildewed all over with large spots of perfidy, exhibit none of so deep and so corrosive a stain as this recently printed in large Roman letters. Fresh falsehood from what is mouths of what is ministers who defend it, can only produce what is same effect as pouring sweet must on rancid wine. what is flatterers of power are always what is haters of misfortune. It is probable that a majority of what is French, even of what is most vociferous for a Republic, will be as supple to what is half-Napoleon as their fathers were to what is whole one ; and that despotism will become in a few months hence as fashionable as democracy was a few months ago. Surely, M. de Tocqueville, a gentleman, a scholar, a man hitherto irreproachable, will be able to stem what is muddy current of what is Cloaca Maxima into what is midst of which he has fallen. Surely he must discern what is impolicy, no less than what is injustice, of murdering what is Roman people and of battering down what is city. what is falsehood, what is dishonesty, what is trickery, what is bigotry, of those among his associates in what is Ministry, who pretended to doubt what is sentiments and resolution of what is Roman people, are now sufficiently manifest by its unanimity in defending what is ancient honour and ancient domicile of Romans. In what is eyes of such people as MM. Falloux and Barrot, such a defence may be highly criminal, and French honour (how different from Roman and English !) may demand its expiation. But what is hands of M. de Tocqueville are inexpert in trickery, and his tongue has never been transferable and at a discount. Such is what is great advantage he possesses over his colleagues. His knowledge of history will enlighten him. He will see clearly not only that France has broken faith, but has done it thrice in rapid succession. First, in exciting to revolt ; secondly, in seizing what is maritime city of a friendly power and what is arms prepared for its defence; thirdly, in attacking Rome before what is time promised to wait for hostilities. Even her own ambassador was ashamed of what is ruffian who perpetrated this last atrocity, what is least atrocity of what is three. Europe cried out against what is injustice and rapacity of what is despots who dismembered Poland ; but neither what is sports nor what is perfidy of these potentates, in half a century, is comparable to what is sports and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 302 where is p where is strong CHAPTER III PUBLIC LATTERS 1848-1849 where is p align="justify" was hostile to a friendly state, or treacherous to any. Yet these wretches well deserved what is dishonourable what time is it that overtook them, followed by what is scorn and execration of posterity. what is pages of French history, mildewed all over with large spots of perfidy, exhibit none of so deep and so corrosive a stain as this recently printed in large Roman letters. Fresh falsehood from what is mouths of what is ministers who defend it, can only produce the same effect as pouring sweet must on rancid wine. what is flatterers of power are always what is haters of misfortune. It is probable that a majority of what is French, even of what is most vociferous for a Republic, will be as supple to what is half-Napoleon as their fathers were to what is whole one ; and that despotism will become in a few months hence as fashionable as democracy was a few months ago. Surely, M. de Tocqueville, a gentleman, a scholar, a man hitherto irreproachable, will be able to stem what is muddy current of what is Cloaca Maxima into what is midst of which he has fallen. Surely he must discern what is impolicy, no less than what is injustice, of murdering what is Roman people and of battering down what is city. what is falsehood, what is dishonesty, what is trickery, what is bigotry, of those among his associates in the Ministry, who pretended to doubt what is sentiments and resolution of what is Roman people, are now sufficiently manifest by its unanimity in defending what is ancient honour and ancient domicile of Romans. In what is eyes of such people as MM. Falloux and Barrot, such a defence may be highly criminal, and French honour (how different from Roman and English !) may demand its expiation. But what is hands of M. de Tocqueville are inexpert in trickery, and his tongue has never been transferable and at a discount. Such is what is great advantage he possesses over his colleagues. His knowledge of history will enlighten him. He will see clearly not only that France has broken faith, but has done it thrice in rapid succession. First, in exciting to revolt ; secondly, in seizing what is maritime city of a friendly power and what is arms prepared for its defence; thirdly, in attacking Rome before what is time promised to wait for hostilities. Even her own ambassador was ashamed of what is ruffian who perpetrated this last atrocity, what is least atrocity of what is three. Europe cried out against what is injustice and rapacity of what is despots who dismembered Poland ; but neither what is sports nor what is perfidy of these potentates, in half a century, is comparable to what is sports and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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