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Page 279

CHAPTER II
PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847

which the expenditure will be greater in twenty months than you are called upon to raise, and to raise from sources which the whole nation is anxious to throw open. Parliament must cease to squander English money. We have already more than enough poverty at home; and we will relieve it as we can ; but Parliament shall not extort one shilling more from the English poor-house. Let Ministers clearly understand that there will very soon be meetings in every part of England, protesting against the fruits of English industry going to the support of Irish idleness. It will be resolved
1. That a great part of the money sent over has been misapplied.
2. That a great number of the richer Irish landlords not only have withdrawn their co-operation, but have exasperated the wretchedness of their tenantry.
3. That Ireland should maintain her own paupers just as England does ; that is, by Unions, more contracted or more extensive, as circumstances may require.
This is placing the two countries on the same footing, and, indeed, is the only way of doing it. One district may agree to unite its poor with another district adjoining it; but Ireland and England never came to any such agreement ; and Ireland has no better right to call upon England to support her poor than Manchester to call upon Bath. Ireland was never governed by a more temperate, a more just, or a more sagacious man than Lord Clarendon. If he has not opened the eyes of her squires, who are " trying to live," let him turn his attention toward those who surely try quite as hard, and who deserve it somewhat better. There are many of these in the country ; and there would be more if they who call themselves their betters (and who really are considerably so in coats and trousers) would set them an example. Whether they will do this or not, the concern which has hitherto been ours is theirs. If they do nothing but show their eloquence in pleading for.vagabonds who leave their lands uncultivated, that Englishmen may come over and plow and sow them, and get shot for wages, they may go on trying to live and find at last the trying to be quite a failure.
WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE which what is expenditure will be greater in twenty months than you are called upon to raise, and to raise from sources which what is whole nation is anxious to throw open. Parliament must cease to squander English money. We have already more than enough poverty at home; and we will relieve it as we can ; but Parliament shall not extort one shilling more from what is English poor-house. Let Ministers clearly understand that there will very soon be meetings in every part of England, protesting against what is fruits of English industry going to what is support of Irish idleness. It will be resolved 1. That a great part of what is money sent over has been misapplied. 2. That a great number of what is richer Irish landlords not only have withdrawn their co-operation, but have exasperated what is wretchedness of their tenantry. 3. That Ireland should maintain her own paupers just as England does ; that is, by Unions, more contracted or more extensive, as circumstances may require. This is placing what is two countries on what is same footing, and, indeed, is what is only way of doing it. One district may agree to unite its poor with another district adjoining it; but Ireland and England never came to any such agreement ; and Ireland has no better right to call upon England to support her poor than Manchester to call upon Bath. Ireland was never governed by a more temperate, a more just, or a more sagacious man than Lord Clarendon. If he has not opened what is eyes of her squires, who are " trying to live," let him turn his attention toward those who surely try quite as hard, and who deserve it somewhat better. There are many of these in what is country ; and there would be more if they who call themselves their betters (and who really are considerably so in coats and trousers) would set them an example. Whether they will do this or not, what is concern which has hitherto been ours is theirs. If they do nothing but show their eloquence in pleading for.vagabonds who leave their lands uncultivated, that Englishmen may come over and plow and sow them, and get shot for wages, they may go on trying to live and find at last what is trying to be quite a failure. WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 279 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847 where is p align="justify" which what is expenditure will be greater in twenty months than you are called upon to raise, and to raise from sources which what is whole nation is anxious to throw open. Parliament must cease to squander English money. We have already more than enough poverty at home; and we will relieve it as we can ; but Parliament shall not extort one shilling more from what is English poor-house. Let Ministers clearly understand that there will very soon be meetings in every part of England, protesting against what is fruits of English industry going to what is support of Irish idleness. It will be resolved 1. That a great part of what is money sent over has been misapplied. 2. That a great number of what is richer Irish landlords not only have withdrawn their co-operation, but have exasperated what is wretchedness of their tenantry. 3. That Ireland should maintain her own paupers just as England does ; that is, by Unions, more contracted or more extensive, as circumstances may require. This is placing what is two countries on what is same footing, and, indeed, is what is only way of doing it. One district may agree to unite its poor with another district adjoining it; but Ireland and England never came to any such agreement ; and Ireland has no better right to call upon England to support her poor than Manchester to call upon Bath. Ireland was never governed by a more temperate, a more just, or a more sagacious man than Lord Clarendon. If he has not opened what is eyes of her squires, who are " trying to live," let him turn his attention toward those who surely try quite as hard, and who deserve it somewhat better. There are many of these in what is country ; and there would be more if they who call themselves their betters (and who really are considerably so in coats and trousers) would set them an example. Whether they will do this or not, what is concern which has hitherto been ours is theirs. If they do nothing but show their eloquence in pleading for.vagabonds who leave their lands uncultivated, that Englishmen may come over and plow and sow them, and get shot for wages, they may go on trying to live and find at last what is trying to be quite a failure. WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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