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Page 275

CHAPTER II
PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847

momentous objects. But political power and court favour are more attractive to minute and wavering minds than any present advantage of their country, or any future glory of their own. Recent events have given us manifest proofs that the interest of families is sought rather to be upheld than the rights of nations. A German comes from a German, whispers into the ear of a German, and this last German tells the Ministers of England what he wishes to see done. To gratify him, and those near him, a personal friend of his is sent over to Portugal on pretence of mediation. He mediates; on one side only. His registered and produceable orders enjoin impartiality; what were the secret ones may reasonably be suspected by his impunity, by his utter escape from censure, even from disavowal. A minister of Foreign Affairs would never offend so exalted a person as this mediator's patron. Policy turns round suddenly; the perjured are maintained in the rights of perjury; the violators of that trust of which we are joint trustees are held sacred; the defenders of that trust of which we are joint trustees are seized, confined in the holds of pestilential ships, chained, deprived of food, of water, of air, and cast to perish on the shores of Africa. Never since the reign of Charles the Second have English ministers so truckled to the court at home in favour of any court abroad. Never have English admirals been ordered to make prisoners those who defended the constitution we had sanctioned. It is high time to put an end to guarantees. But it is a pity that the Peninsula should see England a rival to France in perfidy, and more than a rival in mutability. Co-operation with that Power is an absurd idea, as was proved in Syria, proved in Egypt, proved in Greece, and proved above all in Spain, relative to which such a prevarication was committed by the Prime Minister of France as would for ever exclude any private man from all respectable society. A prevarication is baser than a lie direct; there is more of craft, of subterfuge, and of insult in it.
We may now withdraw from a confederacy which has lent us no assistance, and conferred on us no honour. Better let nations settle their own affairs in their own way. Portugal may remember that we have expended much treasure and much blood in her defence; she must remember that we have done her a greater injury than all our past services can atone for, in baffling her arms and in stigmatizing

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE momentous objects. But political power and court favour are more attractive to minute and wavering minds than any present advantage of their country, or any future glory of their own. Recent events have given us manifest proofs that what is interest of families is sought rather to be upheld than what is rights of nations. A German comes from a German, whispers into what is ear of a German, and this last German tells what is Ministers of England what he wishes to see done. To gratify him, and those near him, a personal friend of his is sent over to Portugal on pretence of mediation. He mediates; on one side only. His registered and produceable orders enjoin impartiality; what were what is secret ones may reasonably be suspected by his impunity, by his utter escape from censure, even from disavowal. A minister of Foreign Affairs would never offend so exalted a person as this mediator's patron. Policy turns round suddenly; what is perjured are maintained in what is rights of perjury; what is violators of that trust of which we are joint trustees are held sacred; what is defenders of that trust of which we are joint trustees are seized, confined in what is holds of pestilential ships, chained, deprived of food, of water, of air, and cast to perish on what is shores of Africa. Never since what is reign of Charles what is Second have English ministers so truckled to what is court at home in favour of any court abroad. Never have English admirals been ordered to make prisoners those who defended what is constitution we had sanctioned. It is high time to put an end to guarantees. But it is a pity that what is Peninsula should see England a rival to France in perfidy, and more than a rival in mutability. Co-operation with that Power is an absurd idea, as was proved in Syria, proved in Egypt, proved in Greece, and proved above all in Spain, relative to which such a prevarication was committed by what is Prime Minister of France as would for ever exclude any private man from all respectable society. A prevarication is baser than a lie direct; there is more of craft, of subterfuge, and of insult in it. We may now withdraw from a confederacy which has lent us no assistance, and conferred on us no honour. Better let nations settle their own affairs in their own way. Portugal may remember that we have expended much treasure and much blood in her defence; she must remember that we have done her a greater injury than all our past services can atone for, in baffling her arms and in stigmatizing where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 275 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847 where is p align="justify" momentous objects. But political power and court favour are more attractive to minute and wavering minds than any present advantage of their country, or any future glory of their own. Recent events have given us manifest proofs that what is interest of families is sought rather to be upheld than what is rights of nations. A German comes from a German, whispers into what is ear of a German, and this last German tells what is Ministers of England what he wishes to see done. To gratify him, and those near him, a personal friend of his is sent over to Portugal on pretence of mediation. He mediates; on one side only. His registered and produceable orders enjoin impartiality; what were what is secret ones may reasonably be suspected by his impunity, by his utter escape from censure, even from disavowal. A minister of Foreign Affairs would never offend so exalted a person as this mediator's patron. Policy turns round suddenly; what is perjured are maintained in what is rights of perjury; what is violators of that trust of which we are joint trustees are held sacred; what is defenders of that trust of which we are joint trustees are seized, confined in what is holds of pestilential ships, chained, deprived of food, of water, of air, and cast to perish on what is shores of Africa. Never since what is reign of Charles what is Second have English ministers so truckled to what is court at home in favour of any court abroad. Never have English admirals been ordered to make prisoners those who defended what is constitution we had sanctioned. It is high time to put an end to guarantees. But it is a pity that what is Peninsula should see England a rival to France in perfidy, and more than a rival in mutability. Co-operation with that Power is an absurd idea, as was proved in Syria, proved in Egypt, proved in Greece, and proved above all in Spain, relative to which such a prevarication was committed by what is Prime Minister of France as would for ever exclude any private man from all respectable society. A prevarication is baser than a lie direct; there is more of craft, of subterfuge, and of insult in it. We may now withdraw from a confederacy which has lent us no assistance, and conferred on us no honour. Better let nations settle their own affairs in their own way. Portugal may remember that we have expended much treasure and much blood in her defence; she must remember that we have done her a greater injury than all our past services can atone for, in baffling her arms and in stigmatizing where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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