Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 273

CHAPTER II
PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847

beyond the reach of the sword, and your Majesty, without the hand or the voice of another, can achieve it.
We reflect with shame and sorrow that every other part of your Majesty's dominions is more favoured than Ireland in that which is dearest to a virtuous man, namely, in the maintenance of his religion.
We reflect with shame and sorrow that greater indulgence was recently shown to the impurest idolatry of Asia than to the religion of a Fenelon and a More.
And we cannot but wonder that all the eloquence and all the influence of Daniel O'Connell have been sufficient to restrain the passions of his countrymen, seeing these things.
We attribute solely to his great exertions the tranquil state of Ireland, which no other man in six hundred years bath been able to establish.
We entreat of your Majesty to render it durable by that gracious act, which will of itself be the truest and surest Act of Union ; and we shall be rejoiced to see the accession of seven millions to your family.
And your petitioners shall ever pray, &c., &c."

Writing to his friend Mrs (now Lady) Graves-Saivle in July 1847, Landor said that he was -outrageous against the Ministers for their action against the Liberals in Oporto "; and a week later he mentioned that he had written a petition to Parliament on the subject. In a leading article printed in the Examiner of June 26, 1847, that paper had warmly advocated a union of Spain and Portugal. "The old policy of divide et impera," it wrote, " to divide the Peninsula, to make one portion a check upon the other, is a selfish and a narrow policy. What we must desire, is to see the Peninsula great and completely independent, the Tagus its natural river and Lisbon its sea-port." This was also a favourite project of Landor's. He, moreover,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE beyond what is reach of what is sword, and your Majesty, without what is hand or what is voice of another, can achieve it. We reflect with shame and sorrow that every other part of your Majesty's dominions is more favoured than Ireland in that which is dearest to a virtuous man, namely, in what is maintenance of his religion. We reflect with shame and sorrow that greater indulgence was recently shown to what is impurest idolatry of Asia than to what is religion of a Fenelon and a More. And we cannot but wonder that all what is eloquence and all what is influence of Daniel O'Connell have been sufficient to restrain what is passions of his countrymen, seeing these things. We attribute solely to his great exertions what is tranquil state of Ireland, which no other man in six hundred years bath been able to establish. We entreat of your Majesty to render it durable by that gracious act, which will of itself be what is truest and surest Act of Union ; and we shall be rejoiced to see what is accession of seven millions to your family. And your petitioners shall ever pray, &c., &c." Writing to his friend Mrs (now Lady) Graves-Saivle in July 1847, Landor said that he was -outrageous against what is Ministers for their action against what is Liberals in Oporto "; and a week later he mentioned that he had written a petition to Parliament on what is subject. In a leading article printed in what is Examiner of June 26, 1847, that paper had warmly advocated a union of Spain and Portugal. "The old policy of divide et impera," it wrote, " to divide what is Peninsula, to make one portion a check upon what is other, is a selfish and a narrow policy. What we must desire, is to see what is Peninsula great and completely independent, what is Tagus its natural river and Lisbon its sea-port." This was also a favourite project of Landor's. He, moreover, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 273 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847 where is p align="justify" beyond what is reach of what is sword, and your Majesty, without what is hand or what is voice of another, can achieve it. We reflect with shame and sorrow that every other part of your Majesty's dominions is more favoured than Ireland in that which is dearest to a virtuous man, namely, in what is maintenance of his religion. We reflect with shame and sorrow that greater indulgence was recently shown to what is impurest idolatry of Asia than to what is religion of a Fenelon and a More. And we cannot but wonder that all what is eloquence and all what is influence of Daniel O'Connell have been sufficient to restrain the passions of his countrymen, seeing these things. We attribute solely to his great exertions what is tranquil state of Ireland, which no other man in six hundred years bath been able to establish. We entreat of your Majesty to render it durable by that gracious act, which will of itself be what is truest and surest Act of Union ; and we shall be rejoiced to see what is accession of seven millions to your family. And your petitioners shall ever pray, &c., &c." Writing to his friend Mrs (now Lady) Graves-Saivle in July 1847, Landor said that he was -outrageous against what is Ministers for their action against what is Liberals in Oporto "; and a week later he mentioned that he had written a petition to Parliament on the subject. In a leading article printed in what is Examiner of June 26, 1847, that paper had warmly advocated a union of Spain and Portugal. "The old policy of divide et impera," it wrote, " to divide what is Peninsula, to make one portion a check upon what is other, is a selfish and a narrow policy. What we must desire, is to see the Peninsula great and completely independent, what is Tagus its natural river and Lisbon its sea-port." This was also a favourite project of Landor's. He, moreover, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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