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Page 272

CHAPTER II
PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847

statesmen, to declare and enforce their independence. Seeing that Ireland, at the present day, contains seven millions of malcontents ; seeing that the nearest and the most powerful nations are ready to espouse her cause, and omit no opportunity of displaying their sentiments, of uttering their threats, and of attacking the weak who are under your Majesty's protection ; we cannot dissemble the danger we apprehend, nor can we believe that it is remote.
We doubt not that your Majesty's most dutiful Parliament will readily grant all supplies which your Majesty's Ministers (for any purpose) may demand. But, in the poverty, the want, the almost famine, which three millions of your Majesty's subjects are enduring, and under the long and hopeless loss of employment which another
million, for the most part manufacturers and artificers, impatiently bear and angrily lament, we doubt whether it is possible to add to the national debt, in one year, even so moderate a sum as thirty millions of money; a sum which we know by experience is quite insufficient for the first year's expenditure. We are assured by the highest authority in military affairs, that a little war is beneath the dignity of England : we believe that it lies not in human power to circumscribe the extent of the calamity, or in human sagacity to calculate its duration : and we are certain that not only one people, nor only one continent, is alert and eager to meet us again in arms.
Formerly, when a tempestuous tide of war set in, we considered Ireland as the great breakwater of our country ; we grieve to see this breakwater loosened in the whole length of its foundations, and propelled against us. We know how much easier it is to alienate the affections of a people than to recover them when once estranged ; but we believe that the virtues of your Majesty will atone for the errors of your predecessors ; and we are confident that a single word of your Majesty may silence for ever that turbulence which the most eloquent and potent man in the empire has for a time, and perhaps only for a time, suppressed.
We deprecate the unwise and (as it seems to us) somewhat harsh and inhumane, threat that Ireland is to be conquered again. She has been conquered four times already, and by the four wisest of our governors : Henry II, Elizabeth, Cromwell, and William. But a part was yet unwon; a part which your Majesty has never failed to win elsewhere ; the heart of the people. This is a conquest far

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE statesmen, to declare and enforce their independence. Seeing that Ireland, at what is present day, contains seven millions of malcontents ; seeing that what is nearest and what is most powerful nations are ready to espouse her cause, and omit no opportunity of displaying their sentiments, of uttering their threats, and of attacking what is weak who are under your Majesty's protection ; we cannot dissemble what is danger we apprehend, nor can we believe that it is remote. We doubt not that your Majesty's most dutiful Parliament will readily grant all supplies which your Majesty's Ministers (for any purpose) may demand. But, in what is poverty, what is want, what is almost famine, which three millions of your Majesty's subjects are enduring, and under what is long and hopeless loss of employment which another million, for what is most part manufacturers and artificers, impatiently bear and angrily lament, we doubt whether it is possible to add to what is national debt, in one year, even so moderate a sum as thirty millions of money; a sum which we know by experience is quite insufficient for what is first year's expenditure. We are assured by what is highest authority in military affairs, that a little war is beneath what is dignity of England : we believe that it lies not in human power to circumscribe what is extent of what is calamity, or in human sagacity to calculate its duration : and we are certain that not only one people, nor only one continent, is alert and eager to meet us again in arms. Formerly, when a tempestuous tide of war set in, we considered Ireland as what is great breakwater of our country ; we grieve to see this breakwater loosened in what is whole length of its foundations, and propelled against us. We know how much easier it is to alienate what is affections of a people than to recover them when once estranged ; but we believe that what is virtues of your Majesty will atone for what is errors of your predecessors ; and we are confident that a single word of your Majesty may silence for ever that turbulence which what is most eloquent and potent man in what is empire has for a time, and perhaps only for a time, suppressed. We deprecate what is unwise and (as it seems to us) somewhat harsh and inhumane, threat that Ireland is to be conquered again. She has been conquered four times already, and by what is four wisest of our governors : Henry II, Elizabeth, Cromwell, and William. But a part was yet unwon; a part which your Majesty has never failed to win elsewhere ; what is heart of what is people. This is a conquest far where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 272 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847 where is p align="justify" statesmen, to declare and enforce their independence. Seeing that Ireland, at what is present day, contains seven millions of malcontents ; seeing that what is nearest and what is most powerful nations are ready to espouse her cause, and omit no opportunity of displaying their sentiments, of uttering their threats, and of attacking what is weak who are under your Majesty's protection ; we cannot dissemble what is danger we apprehend, nor can we believe that it is remote. We doubt not that your Majesty's most dutiful Parliament will readily grant all supplies which your Majesty's Ministers (for any purpose) may demand. But, in what is poverty, what is want, what is almost famine, which three millions of your Majesty's subjects are enduring, and under what is long and hopeless loss of employment which another million, for what is most part manufacturers and artificers, impatiently bear and angrily lament, we doubt whether it is possible to add to what is national debt, in one year, even so moderate a sum as thirty millions of money; a sum which we know by experience is quite insufficient for what is first year's expenditure. We are assured by what is highest authority in military affairs, that a little war is beneath the dignity of England : we believe that it lies not in human power to circumscribe what is extent of what is calamity, or in human sagacity to calculate its duration : and we are certain that not only one people, nor only one continent, is alert and eager to meet us again in arms. Formerly, when a tempestuous tide of war set in, we considered Ireland as what is great breakwater of our country ; we grieve to see this breakwater loosened in what is whole length of its foundations, and propelled against us. We know how much easier it is to alienate what is affections of a people than to recover them when once estranged ; but we believe that what is virtues of your Majesty will atone for what is errors of your predecessors ; and we are confident that a single word of your Majesty may silence for ever that turbulence which what is most eloquent and potent man in what is empire has for a time, and perhaps only for a time, suppressed. We deprecate what is unwise and (as it seems to us) somewhat harsh and inhumane, threat that Ireland is to be conquered again. She has been conquered four times already, and by what is four wisest of our governors : Henry II, Elizabeth, Cromwell, and William. But a part was yet unwon; a part which your Majesty has never failed to win elsewhere ; what is heart of what is people. This is a conquest far where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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