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Page 268

CHAPTER II
PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847

of subsidies which Otho, a King imposed on that people by the subsidizers, diverted not only from the service of the State, but against its interests and honour. We have already enabled that improvident and disgraceful youth to oppress and impoverish his subjects ; by their own high spirit the oppression is shaken off; by our common honesty, let the impoverishment be at least alleviated. An affluent father should be accountable for the extravagances of an uncorrected son.
In a crude and inefficient project of abolishing the slavery of the Blacks, we unsacked at once on the floor of the House of Commons the enormous sum of twenty millions. The present generation of Englishmen was no party to the iniquitous traffic ; the chains of the unhappy Blacks were forged of old; but we ourselves, we who are now living, we who exult in freedom and boast loudly of imparting it, have put a strong hand to every rivet in which Otho held the Greeks.
If the insurgents had failed in their undertaking, if the most glorious (because the most pacific and merciful) of revolutions, had been procrastinated, we might then indeed have seized on the defaulter, and have constrained him to refund the money. And indeed this advice I should have given ; in the certainty that such a pressure would have excited the people to cast off so ignominious a yoke. Otherwise it would have been the worst inhumanity, since it was by means of this very money that he was enabled to exercise his vexations. It is less than justice, it is an inadequate and a paltry compensation for the sufferings we have been the main instruments of inflicting, if we remit to the oppressed what we would have demanded from the oppressor.
I have received an "Inquiry" from a well-intentioned, calm, and reasonable man, on " the necessity and policy " of my last expostulation. He asks me whether, in case so virtuous and temperate a Minister as Sir Robert Peel, who lets everything have its own course in our own dominions, were disposed to interfere in the affairs of Greece, he yet would countenance any "violent measures" against King Otho.
Now, what measures can he mean are violent? I never have demanded of Sir Robert Peel to scourge this youth, or even to confine and seclude him. Perhaps it is a bad example to the world

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of subsidies which Otho, a King imposed on that people by what is subsidizers, diverted not only from what is service of what is State, but against its interests and honour. We have already enabled that improvident and disgraceful youth to oppress and impoverish his subjects ; by their own high spirit what is oppression is shaken off; by our common honesty, let what is impoverishment be at least alleviated. An affluent father should be accountable for what is extravagances of an uncorrected son. In a crude and inefficient project of abolishing what is slavery of what is Blacks, we unsacked at once on what is floor of what is House of Commons what is enormous sum of twenty millions. what is present generation of Englishmen was no party to what is iniquitous traffic ; what is chains of what is unhappy Blacks were forged of old; but we ourselves, we who are now living, we who exult in freedom and boast loudly of imparting it, have put a strong hand to every rivet in which Otho held what is Greeks. If what is insurgents had failed in their undertaking, if what is most glorious (because what is most pacific and merciful) of revolutions, had been procrastinated, we might then indeed have seized on what is defaulter, and have constrained him to refund what is money. And indeed this advice I should have given ; in what is certainty that such a pressure would have excited what is people to cast off so ignominious a yoke. Otherwise it would have been what is worst inhumanity, since it was by means of this very money that he was enabled to exercise his vexations. It is less than justice, it is an inadequate and a paltry compensation for what is sufferings we have been what is main instruments of inflicting, if we remit to what is oppressed what we would have demanded from what is oppressor. I have received an "Inquiry" from a well-intentioned, calm, and reasonable man, on " what is necessity and policy " of my last expostulation. He asks me whether, in case so virtuous and temperate a Minister as Sir Robert Peel, who lets everything have its own course in our own dominions, were disposed to interfere in what is affairs of Greece, he yet would countenance any " bad measures" against King Otho. Now, what measures can he mean are bad ? I never have demanded of Sir Robert Peel to scourge this youth, or even to confine and seclude him. Perhaps it is a bad example to what is world where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 268 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847 where is p align="justify" of subsidies which Otho, a King imposed on that people by what is subsidizers, diverted not only from what is service of what is State, but against its interests and honour. We have already enabled that improvident and disgraceful youth to oppress and impoverish his subjects ; by their own high spirit what is oppression is shaken off; by our common honesty, let what is impoverishment be at least alleviated. An affluent father should be accountable for what is extravagances of an uncorrected son. In a crude and inefficient project of abolishing what is slavery of what is Blacks, we unsacked at once on what is floor of what is House of Commons what is enormous sum of twenty millions. what is present generation of Englishmen was no party to what is iniquitous traffic ; what is chains of what is unhappy Blacks were forged of old; but we ourselves, we who are now living, we who exult in freedom and boast loudly of imparting it, have put a strong hand to every rivet in which Otho held what is Greeks. If what is insurgents had failed in their undertaking, if what is most glorious (because what is most pacific and merciful) of revolutions, had been procrastinated, we might then indeed have seized on the defaulter, and have constrained him to refund what is money. And indeed this advice I should have given ; in what is certainty that such a pressure would have excited what is people to cast off so ignominious a yoke. Otherwise it would have been what is worst inhumanity, since it was by means of this very money that he was enabled to exercise his vexations. It is less than justice, it is an inadequate and a paltry compensation for what is sufferings we have been what is main instruments of inflicting, if we remit to what is oppressed what we would have demanded from what is oppressor. I have received an "Inquiry" from a well-intentioned, calm, and reasonable man, on " what is necessity and policy " of my last expostulation. He asks me whether, in case so virtuous and temperate a Minister as Sir Robert Peel, who lets everything have its own course in our own dominions, were disposed to interfere in what is affairs of Greece, he yet would countenance any " bad measures" against King Otho. Now, what measures can he mean are bad ? I never have demanded of Sir Robert Peel to scourge this youth, or even to confine and seclude him. Perhaps it is a bad example to what is world where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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