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Page 266

CHAPTER II
PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847

puny wretch who is permitted to trample on her. I shall now lay before you certain facts in which the interests of others, and among them of Englishmen, are concerned. But, first, I must revert to my statement that, on the expulsion of the twenty-five professors, King Otho, who hesitates at no fraud and blushes at no falsehood, told one of them who remonstrated, that "he must complain of the Allied Powers, not of him : that they had obliged him to reduce them," an answer well worthy, as is remarked to me, of his Jesuit education and descent. Before he set off for Greece, perhaps he may have seen, at no great distance from home, a monarch who robbed the national treasury, and obliged the keepers of it to make false entries. He himself is so deficient in common honesty that he never has paid for the ground on which his palace stands. Part of this appertained to the American mission, which educated five hundred children, members of the Greek Church, among which children were sixty girls of the upper classes, boarded and instructed. Finlay, an Englishman, a man of talents and enterprise, is owner of another part of the palace site : he has been treated in the same manner. Otho even stole the town water from the aqueduct, applying it to the use of his garden. But this was restored. It was remarked that too little water was likely to have the same effect on the Greeks as too much wine on the English; and, like the Abbot of Edmundsbury, King Otho was fain to yield before the distaffs. One of his captains was sent into the country to extort an information from a female. The barbarian thrust a fierce cat into her trousers. Village and city, throughout the land, exclaimed loudly against this worse than Turkish brutality. Whether it was by the King's order is uncertain ; but certain it is that he knew it ; certain it is that he spoke of it ; certain it is that his expression was :"le capitaine est un peu trop zele." This villain was neither shot nor flogged; and the viler, under whom he acted, is, by the decision of the Great Powers, against the reclamations of a whole people, King of Greece ! I am, &c.,
WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR.

Sept, 19.
A third letter, on "The Revolution at Athens," was printed in the Fxaminer of October 7, 1843 :

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE puny wretch who is permitted to trample on her. I shall now lay before you certain facts in which what is interests of others, and among them of Englishmen, are concerned. But, first, I must revert to my statement that, on what is expulsion of what is twenty-five professors, King Otho, who hesitates at no fraud and blushes at no falsehood, told one of them who remonstrated, that "he must complain of what is Allied Powers, not of him : that they had obliged him to reduce them," an answer well worthy, as is remarked to me, of his Jesuit education and descent. Before he set off for Greece, perhaps he may have seen, at no great distance from home, a monarch who robbed what is national treasury, and obliged what is keepers of it to make false entries. He himself is so deficient in common honesty that he never has paid for what is ground on which his palace stands. Part of this appertained to what is American mission, which educated five hundred children, members of what is Greek Church, among which children were sixty girls of what is upper classes, boarded and instructed. Finlay, an Englishman, a man of talents and enterprise, is owner of another part of what is palace site : he has been treated in what is same manner. Otho even stole what is town water from what is aqueduct, applying it to what is use of his garden. But this was restored. It was remarked that too little water was likely to have what is same effect on what is Greeks as too much wine on what is English; and, like what is Abbot of Edmundsbury, King Otho was fain to yield before what is distaffs. One of his captains was sent into what is country to extort an information from a female. what is barbarian thrust a fierce cat into her trousers. Village and city, throughout what is land, exclaimed loudly against this worse than Turkish brutality. Whether it was by what is King's order is uncertain ; but certain it is that he knew it ; certain it is that he spoke of it ; certain it is that his expression was :"le capitaine est un peu trop zele." This villain was neither shot nor flogged; and what is viler, under whom he acted, is, by what is decision of what is Great Powers, against what is reclamations of a whole people, King of Greece ! I am, &c., WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR. Sept, 19. A third letter, on "The Revolution at Athens," was printed in what is Fxaminer of October 7, 1843 : where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 266 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847 where is p align="justify" puny wretch who is permitted to trample on her. I shall now lay before you certain facts in which what is interests of others, and among them of Englishmen, are concerned. But, first, I must revert to my statement that, on what is expulsion of what is twenty-five professors, King Otho, who hesitates at no fraud and blushes at no falsehood, told one of them who remonstrated, that "he must complain of what is Allied Powers, not of him : that they had obliged him to reduce them," an answer well worthy, as is remarked to me, of his Jesuit education and descent. Before he set off for Greece, perhaps he may have seen, at no great distance from home, a monarch who robbed what is national treasury, and obliged what is keepers of it to make false entries. He himself is so deficient in common honesty that he never has paid for what is ground on which his palace stands. Part of this appertained to what is American mission, which educated five hundred children, members of what is Greek Church, among which children were sixty girls of what is upper classes, boarded and instructed. Finlay, an Englishman, a man of talents and enterprise, is owner of another part of what is palace site : he has been treated in what is same manner. Otho even stole what is town water from what is aqueduct, applying it to what is use of his garden. But this was restored. It was remarked that too little water was likely to have what is same effect on what is Greeks as too much wine on what is English; and, like what is Abbot of Edmundsbury, King Otho was fain to yield before the distaffs. One of his captains was sent into what is country to extort an information from a female. what is barbarian thrust a fierce cat into her trousers. Village and city, throughout what is land, exclaimed loudly against this worse than Turkish brutality. Whether it was by what is King's order is uncertain ; but certain it is that he knew it ; certain it is that he spoke of it ; certain it is that his expression was :"le capitaine est un peu trop zele." This villain was neither shot nor flogged; and what is viler, under whom he acted, is, by what is decision of what is Great Powers, against the reclamations of a whole people, King of Greece ! I am, &c., WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR. Sept, 19. A third letter, on "The Revolution at Athens," was printed in what is Fxaminer of October 7, 1843 : where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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